Special Issue "Nanomaterial Based Chemical Sensors"

A special issue of Chemosensors (ISSN 2227-9040).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Kien-Wen Sun

1. Department of Applied Chemistry, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan
2. Department of Electronics Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 886-3-5712121
Interests: nanostructured materials; opto-electronics of nanomaterials; nanosensors; metal nanoclusters based sensors; plasmonic sensors; bio-molecules detections; luminescent nanomaterials for analyte detection; diamond nanomaterials in chemical sensors; nanocomposite sensors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For the past few decades, the detection of chemically-important analytes has been a concept of innovative research. In this light, chemical sensors based on nanomaterials seem to be attractive in terms of their applicability in environmental and biological studies. Moreover, chemical nanosensors also attracted the industrial world due to their emerging applications. Nanomaterial-based chemical sensors may include a wide variety of candidates, such as fluorescent nanoparticles, plasmonic nanoparticles, organometallic nano-architectures, up-conversion nanoparticles, nanocrystals, nano dots of silica, carbon and semiconductor materials, metal nanoclusters, nanocomposites, and nanostructures biomolecules. The aforementioned candidates have already been applied in the detection of metal ions, anions, pHs, amino acids, proteins, and so on. However, the mechanism behind diverse analyte detection may vary according to the involved forces.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to provide the up to date information on “Nanomaterial Based Chemical Sensors” and to scrutinize the state-of-the-art methods for the development of such nanosensors towards diverse analyte determination. The major scope of this issue will cover chemical sensory applications of fluorescent and plasmonic nanoparticles, metal nanoclusters, nano dots of silica, carbon and semiconductor materials, and nanocomposites. However, sensory applications of other kind of nanomaterials are also encouraged for submission.

Prof. Dr. Kien-Wen Sun
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Chemosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanosensors
  • Nanomaterials
  • Plasmonic sensors
  • Fluorescent nanoparticles
  • Metal nanoclusters
  • Nanocomposites
  • Nano dots
  • Biosensors
  • Cell imaging
  • Environmental analysis

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessCommunication In Situ Metalorganic Deposition of Silver Nanoparticles on Gold Substrate and Square Wave Voltammetry: A Highly Efficient Combination for Nanomolar Detection of Nitrate Ions in Sea Water
Chemosensors 2018, 6(4), 50; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors6040050
Received: 13 August 2018 / Revised: 29 October 2018 / Accepted: 29 October 2018 / Published: 6 November 2018
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Abstract
The electro-reduction of nitrate ions in artificial sea water was investigated at a gold substrate (EAu) functionalized by silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). These AgNPs were generated in situ on the gold substrate by the direct decomposition of the metalorganic N,N′-diisopropylacetamidinate silver precursor [...] Read more.
The electro-reduction of nitrate ions in artificial sea water was investigated at a gold substrate (EAu) functionalized by silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). These AgNPs were generated in situ on the gold substrate by the direct decomposition of the metalorganic N,N′-diisopropylacetamidinate silver precursor [Ag(Amd)] in the liquid phase. Very small and well dispersed AgNPs were deposited on the gold electrode and then used as working electrode (EAu/AgNPs). Square wave voltammetry (SWV) was successfully employed to detect nitrate ions (NO3) with a detection limit (LOD) of 0.9 nmol∙L−1 in artificial sea water (pH = 6.0) without pre-concentration or pH adjustment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterial Based Chemical Sensors)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Review on Nanomaterial-Based Melamine Detection
Received: 27 November 2018 / Revised: 14 February 2019 / Accepted: 15 February 2019 / Published: 20 February 2019
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Abstract
Illegal adulteration of milk products by melamine and its analogs has become a threat to the world. In 2008, the misuse of melamine with infant formula caused serious effects on babies of China. Thereafter, the government of China and the US Food and [...] Read more.
Illegal adulteration of milk products by melamine and its analogs has become a threat to the world. In 2008, the misuse of melamine with infant formula caused serious effects on babies of China. Thereafter, the government of China and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) limited the use of melamine of 1 mg/kg for infant formula and 2.5 mg/kg for other dairy products. Similarly, the World Health Organization (WHO) has also limited the daily intake of melamine of 0.2 mg/kg body weight per day. Many sensory schemes have been proposed by the scientists for carrying out screening on melamine poisoning. Among them, nanomaterial-based sensing techniques are very promising in terms of real-time applicability. These materials uncover and quantify the melamine by means of diverse mechanisms, such as fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), aggregation, inner filter effect, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and self-assembly, etc. Nanomaterials used for the melamine determination include carbon dots, quantum dots, nanocomposites, nanocrystals, nanoclusters, nanoparticles, nanorods, nanowires, and nanotubes. In this review, we summarize and comment on the melamine sensing abilities of these nanomaterials for their suitability and future research directions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterial Based Chemical Sensors)
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