Advances in AMPK Research: Basic and Translational Aspects

A special issue of Cells (ISSN 2073-4409). This special issue belongs to the section "Cell Signaling".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021) | Viewed by 49984

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Heart Center Brandenburg, Brandenburg Medical School, 16321 Bernau, Germany
Interests: cAMP; AMPK; sirtuins; mitochondria; autophagy; heart failure; aging
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Experimental Cardiology, Justus Liebig University Giessen, 35392 Giessen, Germany
Interests: vascular permeability; Rho GTPases; purinergic receptors; platelet biology; endothelial function; ROS
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

5' AMP-activated protein kinase or AMPK is a fascinating kinase regulating numerous cellular processes involved in cell survival and health- and lifespan. This kinase has emerged as a key cellular energy sensor but also as an important integrator of signals managing cellular energy balance. Due to this property and being ubiquitously expressed in all mammalian cell types, AMPK has attracted interest in virtually all areas of human disease, including but not limited to diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, inflammation, aging and, more recently, COVID-19. The advancement in the AMPK research leads AMPK from being an interesting kinase to an important target. Several physiological activities, such as exercise, nutritional management, and fasting, as well as pharmacological interventions, such as resveratrol and metformin, are being employed to manipulate AMPK activity. Furthermore, technical advances such as FRET-based biosensors and computer-based modeling are being developed to study its spatial–temporal activity in cells as well as in vivo.

Authors are invited to submit manuscripts in all areas of recent and current AMPK research with an emphasis on molecular or methodological insights into the physiological and pathological functions of AMPK and its regulatory mechanisms, particularly relevant to human diseases. The Special Issue welcomes up-to-date hypotheses, reviews, research articles, and short communications. Clinical studies, if relevant, as well as computational modeling, are also welcome.

Dr. Yury Ladilov
Dr. Muhammad Aslam
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cells is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • AMPK
  • mTOR
  • fasting
  • energy balance
  • autophagy
  • mitophagy
  • stress
  • survival
  • cell signaling
  • longevity
  • endothelial function
  • biosensors

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Editorial

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3 pages, 201 KiB  
Editorial
New Insights into the Basic and Translational Aspects of AMPK Signaling
by Yury Ladilov and Muhammad Aslam
Cells 2023, 12(2), 206; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells12020206 - 4 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1393
Abstract
5′-adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an enzyme regulating numerous cellular processes involved in cell survival as well as health- and lifespan [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in AMPK Research: Basic and Translational Aspects)

Research

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21 pages, 8032 KiB  
Article
Intestinal Epithelial AMPK Deficiency Causes Delayed Colonic Epithelial Repair in DSS-Induced Colitis
by Séverine Olivier, Hanna Diounou, Camille Pochard, Lisa Frechin, Emilie Durieu, Marc Foretz, Michel Neunlist, Malvyne Rolli-Derkinderen and Benoit Viollet
Cells 2022, 11(4), 590; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells11040590 - 9 Feb 2022
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 4161
Abstract
Dysfunctions in the intestinal barrier, associated with an altered paracellular pathway, are commonly observed in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), principally known as a cellular energy sensor, has also been shown to play a key role in the stabilization [...] Read more.
Dysfunctions in the intestinal barrier, associated with an altered paracellular pathway, are commonly observed in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), principally known as a cellular energy sensor, has also been shown to play a key role in the stabilization and assembly of tight junctions. Here, we aimed to investigate the contribution of intestinal epithelial AMPK to the initiation, progression and resolution of acute colitis. We also tested the hypothesis that protection mediated by metformin administration on intestinal epithelium damage required AMPK activation. A dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis model was used to assess disease progression in WT and intestinal epithelial cell (IEC)-specific AMPK KO mice. Barrier integrity was analyzed by measuring paracellular permeability following dextran-4kDa gavage and pro-inflammatory cytokines and tight junction protein expression. The deletion of intestinal epithelial AMPK delayed intestinal injury repair after DSS exposure and was associated with a slower re-epithelization of the intestinal mucosa coupled with severe ulceration and inflammation, and altered barrier function. Following intestinal injury, IEC AMPK KO mice displayed a lower goblet cell counts with concomitant decreased Muc2 gene expression, unveiling an impaired restitution of goblet cells and contribution to wound healing process. Metformin administration during the recovery phase attenuated the severity of DSS-induced colitis through improvement in intestinal repair capacity in both WT and IEC AMPK KO mice. Taken together, these findings demonstrate a critical role for IEC-expressed AMPK in regulating mucosal repair and epithelial regenerative capacity following acute colonic injury. Our studies further underscore the therapeutic potential of metformin to support repair of the injured intestinal epithelium, but this effect is conferred independently of intestinal epithelial AMPK. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in AMPK Research: Basic and Translational Aspects)
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18 pages, 5626 KiB  
Article
Comparative Analysis of CTRP-Mediated Effects on Cardiomyocyte Glucose Metabolism: Cross Talk between AMPK and Akt Signaling Pathway
by Ling Li, Muhammad Aslam, Benedikt H. Siegler, Bernd Niemann and Susanne Rohrbach
Cells 2021, 10(4), 905; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10040905 - 14 Apr 2021
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 2666
Abstract
C1q/tumor necrosis factor -alpha-related proteins (CTRPs) have been shown to mediate protective cardiovascular effects, but no data exists on their effects on glucose and fatty acid (FA) metabolism in cardiomyocytes. In the present study, adult rat cardiomyocytes and H9C2 cardiomyoblasts were stimulated with [...] Read more.
C1q/tumor necrosis factor -alpha-related proteins (CTRPs) have been shown to mediate protective cardiovascular effects, but no data exists on their effects on glucose and fatty acid (FA) metabolism in cardiomyocytes. In the present study, adult rat cardiomyocytes and H9C2 cardiomyoblasts were stimulated with various recombinant CTRPs. Glucose or FA uptake, expression of genes involved in glucose or FA metabolism and the role of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Akt were investigated. Although most CTRPs induced an increase in phosphorylation of AMPK and Akt in cardiomyocytes, mainly CTRP2, 7, 9 and 13 induced GLUT1 and GLUT4 translocation and glucose uptake in cardiomyocytes, despite high structural similarities among CTRPs. AMPK inhibition reduced the CTRPs-mediated activation of Akt, while Akt inhibition did not impair AMPK activation. In addition, CTRP2, 7, 9 and 13 mediated strong effects on the expression of enzymes involved in glucose or FA metabolism. Loss of adiponectin receptor 1, which has been suggested to be involved in CTRP-induced signal transduction, abolished the effects of some but not all CTRPs on glucose metabolism. Targeting the AMPK signaling pathway via CTRPs may offer a therapeutic principle to restore glucose homeostasis by acting on glucose uptake independent of the Akt pathway. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in AMPK Research: Basic and Translational Aspects)
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Review

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23 pages, 14661 KiB  
Review
Targeting Breast Cancer and Their Stem Cell Population through AMPK Activation: Novel Insights
by Bhawna Uprety and Heidi Abrahamse
Cells 2022, 11(3), 576; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells11030576 - 7 Feb 2022
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 3887
Abstract
Despite some significant advancements, breast cancer has become the most prevalent cancer in the world. One of the main reasons for failure in treatment and metastasis has been attributed to the presence of cancer initiating cells—cancer stem cells. Consequently, research is now being [...] Read more.
Despite some significant advancements, breast cancer has become the most prevalent cancer in the world. One of the main reasons for failure in treatment and metastasis has been attributed to the presence of cancer initiating cells—cancer stem cells. Consequently, research is now being focussed on targeting cancer cells along with their stem cell population. Non-oncology drugs are gaining increasing attention for their potent anticancer activities. Metformin, a drug commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes, is the best example in this regard. It exerts its therapeutic action by activating 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Activated AMPK subsequently phosphorylates and targets several cellular pathways involved in cell growth and proliferation and the maintenance of stem-like properties of cancer stem cells. Therefore, AMPK is emerging as a target of choice for developing effective anticancer drugs. Vanadium compounds are well-known PTP inhibitors and AMPK activators. They find extensive applications in treatment of diabetes and obesity via PTP1B inhibition and AMPK-mediated inhibition of adipogenesis. However, their role in targeting cancer stem cells has not been explored yet. This review is an attempt to establish the applications of insulin mimetic vanadium compounds for the treatment of breast cancer by AMPK activation and PTP1B inhibition pathways. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in AMPK Research: Basic and Translational Aspects)
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15 pages, 3064 KiB  
Review
Emerging Role of cAMP/AMPK Signaling
by Muhammad Aslam and Yury Ladilov
Cells 2022, 11(2), 308; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells11020308 - 17 Jan 2022
Cited by 70 | Viewed by 9306
Abstract
The 5′-Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a natural energy sensor in mammalian cells that plays a key role in cellular and systemic energy homeostasis. At the cellular level, AMPK supports numerous processes required for energy and redox homeostasis, including mitochondrial biogenesis, [...] Read more.
The 5′-Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a natural energy sensor in mammalian cells that plays a key role in cellular and systemic energy homeostasis. At the cellular level, AMPK supports numerous processes required for energy and redox homeostasis, including mitochondrial biogenesis, autophagy, and glucose and lipid metabolism. Thus, understanding the pathways regulating AMPK activity is crucial for developing strategies to treat metabolic disorders. Mounting evidence suggests the presence of a link between cyclic AMP (cAMP) and AMPK signaling. cAMP signaling is known to be activated in circumstances of physiological and metabolic stress due to the release of stress hormones, such as adrenaline and glucagon, which is followed by activation of membrane-bound adenylyl cyclase and elevation of cellular cAMP. Because the majority of physiological stresses are associated with elevated energy consumption, it is not surprising that activation of cAMP signaling may promote AMPK activity. Aside from the physiological role of the cAMP/AMPK axis, numerous reports have suggested its role in several pathologies, including inflammation, ischemia, diabetes, obesity, and aging. Furthermore, novel reports have provided more mechanistic insight into the regulation of the cAMP/AMPK axis. In particular, the role of distinct cAMP microdomains generated by soluble adenylyl cyclase in regulating basal and induced AMPK activity has recently been demonstrated. In the present review, we discuss current advances in the understanding of the regulation of the cAMP/AMPK axis and its role in cellular homeostasis and explore some translational aspects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in AMPK Research: Basic and Translational Aspects)
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24 pages, 2574 KiB  
Review
A Narrative Review on the Role of AMPK on De Novo Lipogenesis in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Evidence from Human Studies
by Christian von Loeffelholz, Sina M. Coldewey and Andreas L. Birkenfeld
Cells 2021, 10(7), 1822; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10071822 - 19 Jul 2021
Cited by 26 | Viewed by 4757
Abstract
5′AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is known as metabolic sensor in mammalian cells that becomes activated by an increasing adenosine monophosphate (AMP)/adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratio. The heterotrimeric AMPK protein comprises three subunits, each of which has multiple phosphorylation sites, playing an important role in [...] Read more.
5′AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is known as metabolic sensor in mammalian cells that becomes activated by an increasing adenosine monophosphate (AMP)/adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratio. The heterotrimeric AMPK protein comprises three subunits, each of which has multiple phosphorylation sites, playing an important role in the regulation of essential molecular pathways. By phosphorylation of downstream proteins and modulation of gene transcription AMPK functions as a master switch of energy homeostasis in tissues with high metabolic turnover, such as the liver, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue. Regulation of AMPK under conditions of chronic caloric oversupply emerged as substantial research target to get deeper insight into the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Evidence supporting the role of AMPK in NAFLD is mainly derived from preclinical cell culture and animal studies. Dysbalanced de novo lipogenesis has been identified as one of the key processes in NAFLD pathogenesis. Thus, the scope of this review is to provide an integrative overview of evidence, in particular from clinical studies and human samples, on the role of AMPK in the regulation of primarily de novo lipogenesis in human NAFLD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in AMPK Research: Basic and Translational Aspects)
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19 pages, 1392 KiB  
Review
The Role of AMPK Signaling in Brown Adipose Tissue Activation
by Jamie I. van der Vaart, Mariëtte R. Boon and Riekelt H. Houtkooper
Cells 2021, 10(5), 1122; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10051122 - 6 May 2021
Cited by 41 | Viewed by 7692
Abstract
Obesity is becoming a pandemic, and its prevalence is still increasing. Considering that obesity increases the risk of developing cardiometabolic diseases, research efforts are focusing on new ways to combat obesity. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has emerged as a possible target to achieve [...] Read more.
Obesity is becoming a pandemic, and its prevalence is still increasing. Considering that obesity increases the risk of developing cardiometabolic diseases, research efforts are focusing on new ways to combat obesity. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has emerged as a possible target to achieve this for its functional role in energy expenditure by means of increasing thermogenesis. An important metabolic sensor and regulator of whole-body energy balance is AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and its role in energy metabolism is evident. This review highlights the mechanisms of BAT activation and investigates how AMPK can be used as a target for BAT activation. We review compounds and other factors that are able to activate AMPK and further discuss the therapeutic use of AMPK in BAT activation. Extensive research shows that AMPK can be activated by a number of different kinases, such as LKB1, CaMKK, but also small molecules, hormones, and metabolic stresses. AMPK is able to activate BAT by inducing adipogenesis, maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis and inducing browning in white adipose tissue. We conclude that, despite encouraging results, many uncertainties should be clarified before AMPK can be posed as a target for anti-obesity treatment via BAT activation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in AMPK Research: Basic and Translational Aspects)
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26 pages, 1507 KiB  
Review
Multifaceted Role of AMPK in Viral Infections
by Maimoona Shahid Bhutta, Elisa S. Gallo and Ronen Borenstein
Cells 2021, 10(5), 1118; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10051118 - 6 May 2021
Cited by 29 | Viewed by 4710
Abstract
Viral pathogens often exploit host cell regulatory and signaling pathways to ensure an optimal environment for growth and survival. Several studies have suggested that 5′-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an intracellular serine/threonine kinase, plays a significant role in the modulation of infection. Traditionally, [...] Read more.
Viral pathogens often exploit host cell regulatory and signaling pathways to ensure an optimal environment for growth and survival. Several studies have suggested that 5′-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an intracellular serine/threonine kinase, plays a significant role in the modulation of infection. Traditionally, AMPK is a key energy regulator of cell growth and proliferation, host autophagy, stress responses, metabolic reprogramming, mitochondrial homeostasis, fatty acid β-oxidation and host immune function. In this review, we highlight the modulation of host AMPK by various viruses under physiological conditions. These intracellular pathogens trigger metabolic changes altering AMPK signaling activity that then facilitates or inhibits viral replication. Considering the COVID-19 pandemic, understanding the regulation of AMPK signaling following infection can shed light on the development of more effective therapeutic strategies against viral infectious diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in AMPK Research: Basic and Translational Aspects)
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17 pages, 1398 KiB  
Review
AICAr, a Widely Used AMPK Activator with Important AMPK-Independent Effects: A Systematic Review
by Dora Višnjić, Hrvoje Lalić, Vilma Dembitz, Barbara Tomić and Tomislav Smoljo
Cells 2021, 10(5), 1095; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10051095 - 4 May 2021
Cited by 56 | Viewed by 9434
Abstract
5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside (AICAr) has been one of the most commonly used pharmacological modulators of AMPK activity. The majority of early studies on the role of AMPK, both in the physiological regulation of metabolism and in cancer pathogenesis, were based solely on the use [...] Read more.
5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside (AICAr) has been one of the most commonly used pharmacological modulators of AMPK activity. The majority of early studies on the role of AMPK, both in the physiological regulation of metabolism and in cancer pathogenesis, were based solely on the use of AICAr as an AMPK-activator. Even with more complex models of AMPK downregulation and knockout being introduced, AICAr remained a regular starting point for many studies focusing on AMPK biology. However, there is an increasing number of studies showing that numerous AICAr effects, previously attributed to AMPK activation, are in fact AMPK-independent. This review aims to give an overview of the present knowledge on AMPK-dependent and AMPK-independent effects of AICAr on metabolism, hypoxia, exercise, nucleotide synthesis, and cancer, calling for caution in the interpretation of AICAr-based studies in the context of understanding AMPK signaling pathway. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in AMPK Research: Basic and Translational Aspects)
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