Special Issue "Management of Early Stage Cervical Cancer"

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694). This special issue belongs to the section "Cancer Causes, Screening and Diagnosis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 October 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Valerio Gallotta
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Guest Editor
Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, IRCCS, UOC Ginecologia Oncologica, Dipartimento per la salute della Donna e del Bambino e della Salute Pubblica, Roma, Italy
Interests: cervical cancer; minimally invasive surgery; fertility sparing treatments; translational medicine; sentinel lymph node concept; gynecological cancers
Dr. Luigi Pedone Anchora
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Guest Editor
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, IRCCS-Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Largo Francesco Vito 1, 00168, Rome, Italy
Interests: cervical cancer; minimally invasive surgery; translational medicine; sentinel lymph node; gynecological cancers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cervical carcinoma is a common gynecological malignancy, still representing a challenge for oncologic gynecologists around the world.

A proper and accurate preoperative staging of early-stage disease, obtained through advancements of diagnostic procedures (US, MRI, PET scan), allows personalized treatments. Modulation of surgical radicality, fertility sparing therapies, sentinel node technique, concept of ovarian preservation, introduction of translational medicine, and molecular investigations are the cornerstones of cervical cancer treatment that, in recent years, have become increasingly tailored. In this context, management of cervical cancer requires a multidisciplinary approach involving oncologic gynecologists, medical oncologists, radiologists, radiotherapists, and pathologists. The aim of this Special Issue is to focus on new evidence regarding diagnosis and treatment of early-stage cervical cancer, which could lead to an improvement in clinical practice or could set up new research frontiers in the management of this disease.

Dr. Valerio Gallotta
Dr. Luigi Pedone Anchora
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cancers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cervical cancer
  • fertility sparing
  • sentinel lymph node
  • radical surgery
  • diagnosis and staging
  • prognostic characterization
  • personalized treatment
  • adjuvant therapy
  • molecular investigations
  • translational medicine

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Transcription Factor Homeobox D9 Drives the Malignant Phenotype of HPV18-Positive Cervical Cancer Cells via Binding to the Viral Early Promoter
Cancers 2021, 13(18), 4613; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13184613 - 15 Sep 2021
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Abstract
Persistent infections with two types of human papillomaviruses (HPV), HPV16 and HPV18, are the most common cause of cervical cancer (CC). Two viral early genes, E6 and E7, are associated with tumor development, and expressions of E6 and E7 are primarily regulated [...] Read more.
Persistent infections with two types of human papillomaviruses (HPV), HPV16 and HPV18, are the most common cause of cervical cancer (CC). Two viral early genes, E6 and E7, are associated with tumor development, and expressions of E6 and E7 are primarily regulated by a single viral promoter: P97 in HPV16 and P105 in HPV18. We previously demonstrated that the homeobox D9 (HOXD9) transcription factor is responsible for the malignancy of HPV16-positive CC cell lines via binding to the P97 promoter. Here, we investigated whether HOXD9 is also involved in the regulation of the P105 promoter using two HPV18-positive CC cell lines, SKG-I and HeLa. Following the HOXD9 knockdown, cell viability was significantly reduced, and E6 expression was suppressed and was accompanied by increased protein levels of P53, while mRNA levels of TP53 did not change. E7 expression was also downregulated and, while mRNA levels of RB1 and E2F were unchanged, mRNA levels of E2F-target genes, MCM2 and PCNA, were decreased, which indicates that the HOXD9 knockdown downregulates E7 expression, thus leading to an inactivation of E2F and the cell-cycle arrest. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and promoter reporter assays confirmed that HOXD9 is directly associated with the P105 promoter. Collectively, our results reveal that HOXD9 drives the HPV18 early promoter activity to promote proliferation and immortalization of the CC cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management of Early Stage Cervical Cancer)
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Review

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Review
Useful MRI Findings for Minimally Invasive Surgery for Early Cervical Cancer
Cancers 2021, 13(16), 4078; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13164078 - 13 Aug 2021
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Abstract
According to the recent International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging system, Stage III cervical cancer indicates pelvic or paraaortic lymph node metastasis. Accordingly, the new FIGO stage accepts imaging modalities, such as MRI, as part of the FIGO 2018 updated staging. [...] Read more.
According to the recent International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging system, Stage III cervical cancer indicates pelvic or paraaortic lymph node metastasis. Accordingly, the new FIGO stage accepts imaging modalities, such as MRI, as part of the FIGO 2018 updated staging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best imaging modality to estimate the size or volume of uterine cancer because of its excellent soft tissue contrast. As a result, MRI is being used increasingly to determine treatment options and follow-up for cervical cancer patients. Increasing availability of cancer screening and vaccination have improved early detection of cervical cancer. However, the incidence of early cervical cancers has increased compared to that of advanced cervical cancer. A few studies have investigated if MRI findings are useful in management of early cervical cancer. MRI can precisely predict tumor burden, allowing conization, trachelectomy, and simple hysterectomy to be considered as minimally invasive treatment options for early cervical cancer. This imaging modality also can be used to determine whether there is recurrent cancer following minimally invasive treatments. The purpose of this review is to highlight useful MRI features for managing women with early cervical cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management of Early Stage Cervical Cancer)
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Other

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Perspective
A New Anatomic and Staging-Oriented Classification of Radical Hysterectomy
Cancers 2021, 13(13), 3326; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13133326 - 02 Jul 2021
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Abstract
The current understanding of radical hysterectomy more is centered on the uterus and little is being discussed about the resection of the vaginal cuff and the paracolpium as an essential part of this procedure. This is because that the current classifications of radical [...] Read more.
The current understanding of radical hysterectomy more is centered on the uterus and little is being discussed about the resection of the vaginal cuff and the paracolpium as an essential part of this procedure. This is because that the current classifications of radical hysterectomy are based only on the lateral extent of resection. This way is easier to be understood but does not reflect the anatomical and surgical conception of radical hysterectomy and the three-dimensional ways of tumour spreading, neither meet the need of adjusting the radicality according to the different stages of FIGO classification, which depends—at least in the early stages—on the tumour volume and the infiltration in the vagina (but not on the directly spread in the parametrium). The new classification presented in this paper does not base anymore on the lateral extent of resection only but too on the depth of resection in the small pelvic and the extent of the resected vaginal vault without or with its three-dimensional paracolpium. This classification takes into account the tumour size, stage, localization and infiltration in the vaginal vault and may offer the optimal tool to adjust and tailor the surgery according to these important variables. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management of Early Stage Cervical Cancer)
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