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Special Issue "Clinical and Translational Research in Gastrointestinal Cancers"

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 March 2023 | Viewed by 1378

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Savio Barreto
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
HPB Unit, Flinders Medical Centre & Flinders University, Adelaide 5001, Australia
Interests: pancreatic cancer; outcomes; translational research
Prof. Dr. Jörg Kleeff
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Visceral, Vascular and Endocrine Surgery, University Hospital Halle (Saale), Ernst-Grube-Str. 40, 06120 Halle (Saale), Germany
Interests: pancreatic cancer; clinical research; surgery; translational research; microenvironment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Gastrointestinal (GI) cancers pose a major challenge to global public health. In 2018, Arnold and colleagues (PMID: 32247694) estimated that, there were 4.8 million new cases of GI cancers and 3.4 million related deaths, worldwide. Lu and colleagues (PMID: 34563100) have recently quantified the impact of lifestyle-related factors on causing GI cancers. There remain many options for the primary and secondary prevention of these cancers, and the management of these cancers is also evolving. Minimally invasive (laparoscopic and robotic) surgery is becoming increasingly applied to complement open surgery. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy have not only resulted in lengthening disease-free survival, but also have a significant impact on overall survival. The last decade has witnessed a paradigm shift with a growing interest in cancer survivorship and quality of life. This Special Issue aims to bring together original research, as well as impactful reviews from around the world, which highlight the progress being made in different aspects of the management, including survivorship, of a broad spectrum of GI cancers.

There is a need to highlight and celebrate impactful research being carried out across the broad spectrum of gastrointestinal (GI) cancers, bringing together original research, as well as impactful reviews from around the world highlighting the progress being made in different aspects of the management, including survivorship, of a broad spectrum of GI cancers.

Dr. Savio Barreto
Prof. Dr. Jörg Kleeff
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cancers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • surgery
  • chemotherapy
  • radiation therapy
  • outcomes
  • quality of life
  • survival
  • survivorship
  • biomarkers
  • imaging

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Identification of Risk Factors for Sexual Dysfunction after Multimodal Therapy of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer and Their Impact on Quality of Life: A Single-Center Trial
Cancers 2022, 14(23), 5796; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers14235796 - 24 Nov 2022
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Abstract
Purpose: Sexual function is crucial for the quality of life and can be highly affected by preoperative therapy and surgery. The aim of this study was to identify potential risk factors for poor sexual function and quality of life. Methods: Female patients were [...] Read more.
Purpose: Sexual function is crucial for the quality of life and can be highly affected by preoperative therapy and surgery. The aim of this study was to identify potential risk factors for poor sexual function and quality of life. Methods: Female patients were asked to complete the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI-6). Male patients were demanded to answer the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5). Results: In total, 79 patients filled in the questionary, yielding a response rate of 41.57%. The proportion of women was represented by 32.91%, and the median age was 76.0 years (66.0–81.0). Sexual dysfunction appeared in 88.46% of female patients. Severe erectile dysfunction occurred in 52.83% of male patients. Univariate analysis showed female patients (OR: 0.17, 95%CI: 0.05–0.64, p = 0.01), older age (OR: 0.34, 95%CI 0.11–1.01, p = 0.05), tumor localization under 6cm from the anal verge (OR: 4.43, 95%CI: 1.44–13.67, p = 0.01) and extension of operation (APR and ISR) (OR: 0.13, 95%CI: 0.03–0.59, p = 0.01) as significant risk factors for poor outcome. Female patients (OR: 0.12, 95%CI: 0.03–0.62, p = 0.01) and tumors below 6 cm from the anal verge (OR: 4.64, 95%CI: 1.18–18.29, p = 0.03) were shown to be independent risk factors for sexual dysfunction after multimodal therapy in the multivariate analysis. Quality of life was only affected in the case of extensive surgery (p = 0.02). Conclusion: Higher Age, female sex, distal tumors and extensive surgery (APR, ISR) are revealed risk factors for SD in this study. Quality of life was only affected in the case of APR or ISR. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical and Translational Research in Gastrointestinal Cancers)
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Article
Expansion of Liver Transplantation Criteria for Hepatocellular Carcinoma from Milan to UCSF in Australia and New Zealand and Justification for Metroticket 2.0
Cancers 2022, 14(11), 2777; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers14112777 - 03 Jun 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 892
Abstract
Background: Expansion in liver transplantation (LT) criteria for HCC from Milan to UCSF has not adversely impacted overall survival, prompting further expansion towards Metroticket 2.0 (MT2). In this study, we compared patient survival post-transplant before and after 2007 and long-term outcomes for LT [...] Read more.
Background: Expansion in liver transplantation (LT) criteria for HCC from Milan to UCSF has not adversely impacted overall survival, prompting further expansion towards Metroticket 2.0 (MT2). In this study, we compared patient survival post-transplant before and after 2007 and long-term outcomes for LT within Milan versus UCSF criteria (to determine the true benefit of the expansion of criteria) and retrospectively validated the MT2 criteria. Methods: Retrospective analysis of ANZLITR (including all patients transplanted for HCC since July 1997). The entire cohort was divided based on criteria used at the time of listing, namely, Milan era (1997–2006) and the UCSF era (2007–July 2015). Results: The overall 5- and 10-year cumulative survival rates for the entire cohort of 691 patients were 78% and 69%, respectively. Patients transplanted in UCSF era had significantly higher 5- and 10-year survival rates than in the Milan era (80% vs. 73% and 72% vs. 65%, respectively; p = 0.016). In the UCSF era, the 5-year survival rate for patients transplanted within Milan criteria was significantly better than those transplanted outside Milan but within UCSF criteria (83% vs. 73%; p < 0.024). Patients transplanted within the MT2 criteria had a significantly better 5- and 10-year survival rate as compared to those outside the criteria (81% vs. 64% and 73% vs. 50%, respectively; p = 0.001). Conclusion: Overall survival following LT for HCC has significantly improved over time despite expanding criteria from Milan to UCSF. Patients fulfilling the MT2 criteria have a survival comparable to the UCSF cohort. Thus, expansion of criteria to MT2 is justifiable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical and Translational Research in Gastrointestinal Cancers)
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