Rethinking Building Maintenance

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Materials, and Repair & Renovation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2023) | Viewed by 3949

Special Issue Editors

CERIS, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: service life prediction, durability and life cycle of buildings and their components; maintenance modelling; statistical models
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Guest Editor
Construction Research Centre, National Research Council Canada, 1200 Montreal Road, Building M-24, Ottawa, ON K1A0R6, Canada
Interests: buildings and building engineering; climate and climate modelling; simulation and numerical modelling; materials and materials technology; durability of materials and components; sustainability
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Guest Editor
Department of Construction Engineering and Management, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 4860 Santiago, Chile
Interests: service life; digital construction management; fuzzy logic

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Guest Editor
Department of Mathematics, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya-BarcelonaTECH, Barcelona, Spain
Interests: survival analysis; durability in building and civil engineering; functional performance in building construction; joint modeling of longitudinal and survival data; missing data

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The concept of maintenance initially emerged in the industrial and mechanical engineering sector. It is generally acknowledged that maintenance activities in the construction sector over the past decades have been seen as a necessary nuisance. The majority of maintenance actions in the construction sector are still reactive, with the selection of a given maintenance action to minimize costs, regardless of the risks, whilst sacrificing user interests and building performance. Frequently, the adopted maintenance policies have presented numerous limitations, such as that the implementation of strategic procedures is often poor or nonexistent, the information regarding the durability and performance of buildings is neglected, the risk of failure over time is not considered, and the global costs associated with repairs are not adequately addressed. Fortunately, such approaches have increasingly been replaced with improved approaches, and real estate managers currently recognize that appropriate maintenance is the only way to ensure the long-term durability of constructed assets, in the most economical way and without compromising their reliability or safety.

This Special Issue Rethinking Building Maintenance will provide an overview of existing knowledge on new approaches for building maintenance. Original research, theoretical and experimental work, case studies, and comprehensive review papers are invited for possible publication. Relevant topics to this Special Issue include but are not limited to the following subjects:

  • New approaches for building maintenance;
  • Imperfect maintenance policies;
  • Condition-based maintenance strategies;
  • Opportunistic maintenance;
  • Digital methodologies applied to heritage building maintenance;
  • Building maintenance under climate change.

Dr. Ana Silva
Dr. Michael A. Lacasse
Dr. Andrés Prieto
Dr. Carles Serrat Piè
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • maintenance strategies
  • service life
  • maintainability
  • serviceability
  • functionality
  • imperfect maintenance

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 4611 KiB  
Article
Mapping the Risk of Occurrence of Defects in Façades with Ceramic Claddings
by Wilamy Castro, Jéssica Souza, Pedro Gaspar and Ana Silva
Buildings 2023, 13(5), 1209; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13051209 - 3 May 2023
Viewed by 1632
Abstract
When a building façade does not meet its performance requirements, the integrity and safety of the structure may be compromised, resulting in the reduction of the building’s service life. Ceramic tiles are a commonly applied cladding solution due to their aesthetic value and [...] Read more.
When a building façade does not meet its performance requirements, the integrity and safety of the structure may be compromised, resulting in the reduction of the building’s service life. Ceramic tiles are a commonly applied cladding solution due to their aesthetic value and durability. However, as soon as ceramic claddings are installed, the claddings are subjected to various degradation agents, thus starting a degradation process in which different anomalies occur sequentially and simultaneously over the years. This study intends to find patterns of incidence of anomalies in distinct areas of the façade and to map the risk of occurrence of a given anomaly. For that purpose, 345 ceramic claddings are analysed (46 buildings, corresponding to 81,500 m2) in the region of Brasília, Brazil. Four main defects are identified based on visual inspections and using auxiliary diagnosis techniques, namely (i) detachment of ceramic tiles; (ii) cracking; (iii) grout failure; (iv) efflorescence. The results reveal that the detachment is the most frequent defect. The sensitivity maps proposed allow identifying a certain pattern in the occurrence of defects on ceramic claddings, revealing that continuous walls, transition between floors, and the top of the building are areas critically vulnerable to defects. The results obtained allow mapping the sensitivity of each part of the ceramic claddings to a given defect, aiding the detection and diagnosis of the degradation condition when carrying out inspections on new façades. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rethinking Building Maintenance)
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20 pages, 1620 KiB  
Article
A Deterioration Model for Sewer Pipes Using CCTV and Artificial Intelligence
by Comfort Salihu, Saeed Reza Mohandes, Ahmed Farouk Kineber, M. Reza Hosseini, Faris Elghaish and Tarek Zayed
Buildings 2023, 13(4), 952; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13040952 - 3 Apr 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2737
Abstract
Sewer pipeline failures pose significant threats to the environment and public health. To tackle these repercussions, many deterioration models have been developed to predict the conditions of sewer pipes, most of which are based on CCTV inspection reports. However, these reports are prone [...] Read more.
Sewer pipeline failures pose significant threats to the environment and public health. To tackle these repercussions, many deterioration models have been developed to predict the conditions of sewer pipes, most of which are based on CCTV inspection reports. However, these reports are prone to errors due to their subjective nature and human involvement. More importantly, there are insufficient data to develop prudent deterioration models. To address these shortcomings, this paper aims to develop a CCTV-based deterioration model for sewer pipes using Artificial Intelligence (AI). The AI-based model relies on the integration of an unsupervised, multilinear regression technique and Weibull analysis. Findings derived from the Weibull deterioration curve indicate that the useful service life for concrete and vitrified clay pipes are 79 years and 48 years, respectively. The regression models show that the R2 value for vitrified clay sewer pipes, concrete sewer pipes, and ductile iron sewer pipes are 71.18%, 71.47%, and 81.51%, respectively, and 73.69% for concrete stormwater pipes. To illustrate the impact of various factors on sewer pipes, sensitivity analyses under different scenarios are conducted. These analyses indicate that pipe diameter has a significant influence on sewer pipe deterioration, with little impact on stormwater pipes. These findings would guide decision makers in identifying critical pipes and taking necessary precautionary measures. Further, this provides a sound basis for prioritizing maintenance actions, which would pave the way for designing sustainable urban drainage systems for cities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rethinking Building Maintenance)
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