Special Issue "Building Design and Daylighting Performance"

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2017).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dale Brentrup, AIA
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Architecture, University of North Carolina, Charlotte, NC, USA
Interests: daylighting; integrated building systems design; energy performance/simulation; occupant thermal, visual comfort and well-being
Prof. Dr. Ertunga C. Ozelkan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Systems Engineering and Engineering Management, University of North Carolina, Charlotte, NC, USA
Interests: energy efficient building design and optimization; sustainable decision making; flexible production systems planning and optimization
Dr. Benjamin Futtrell
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Architecture, Infrastructure and Environmental Systems Ph.D. Program, University of North Carolina, Charlotte, NC, USA
Interests: systems engineering; electrical and computer engineering; building energy model calibration; building design optimization with specific focus on thermal and daylighting impacts of the building envelope, and operational building energy performance

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Daylighting is said to be the catalyst for applied research in architecture and allied disciplines. It is “an access point for a larger energy-conscious design market transformation” that can leverage carbon neutrality and increase occupant well-being by design. Rather than relying on component technologies, daylighting is shaped and delivered by the architecture itself. This Special Issue will explore the number of performance-based issues that surround the delivery of the appropriate application of daylighting technology in commercial and institutional building types. It will provide a forum for discussion of key factors influencing the shaping and design of a buildings enclosure for daylighting that are critical to achieving the objectives embodied within the integrative design approach. 

The primary objective of this Issue is to introduce the contemporary theory, methods and design applications of daylighting and electrical lighting integration as key elements toward achieving sustainable architectural design. This Special Issue will explore:

  • The impact and design limits that the architectural system of daylight enclosure have on lighting and energy performance, and on the attainment of sustained environmental quality.
  • The contemporary tools, analytic methods and digital media used in the simulation, evaluation and prediction of luminous and thermal performance.
  • The validation of performance metrics to provide greater measures of occupant performance productivity and well-being.
Consider:
Diagram

Prof. Dale Brentrup, AIA
Prof. Dr. Ertunga C. Ozelkan
Dr. Benjamin Futtrell
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate based daylighting performance
  • occupant visual and thermal comfort
  • simulation and optimization
  • metrics, design application and verification methods
  • occupant well-being and return of investment (ROI)

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Evaluation of Suitability of a Parametrically Controlled Louvers for Various Orientations throughout a Year Comparing to an Existing Case
Buildings 2017, 7(4), 109; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings7040109 - 29 Nov 2017
Cited by 2
Abstract
Nowadays, daylighting systems and shading devices are controlled automatically to achieve their optimum benefits. For more comprehensive accuracy, parametric control was recently used to manage complex parameters with more accuracy. Such a system was proposed and investigated in a previous research to provide [...] Read more.
Nowadays, daylighting systems and shading devices are controlled automatically to achieve their optimum benefits. For more comprehensive accuracy, parametric control was recently used to manage complex parameters with more accuracy. Such a system was proposed and investigated in a previous research to provide steadier and more uniform daylight illuminance during the day and reduce more than 80% of the electricity consumption. This study is examining the daylighting performance by using the parametric system in different orientations and comparing with the conventional ones. Furthermore, the study will evaluate the suitability of the parametric system throughout the year during the working hours in a typical office room. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Design and Daylighting Performance)
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Open AccessReview
A Conceptual Framework for Integration of Evidence-Based Design with Lighting Simulation Tools
Buildings 2017, 7(4), 82; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings7040082 - 22 Sep 2017
Cited by 1
Abstract
The use of lighting simulation tools has been growing over the past years which has improved lighting analysis. While computer simulations have proven to be a viable tool for analyzing lighting in physical environments, they have difficulty in assessing the effects of light [...] Read more.
The use of lighting simulation tools has been growing over the past years which has improved lighting analysis. While computer simulations have proven to be a viable tool for analyzing lighting in physical environments, they have difficulty in assessing the effects of light on occupant’s perception. Evidence-based design (EBD) is a design method that is gaining traction in building design due to its strength in providing means to assess the effects of built environments on humans. The aim of this study was to develop a conceptual framework for integrating EBD with lighting simulation tools. Based on a literature review, it was investigated how EBD and lighting simulation can be combined to provide a holistic lighting performance evaluation method. The results show that they can mutually benefit from each other. EBD makes it possible to evaluate and/or improve performance metrics by utilizing user feedback. On the other hand, performance metrics can be used for a better description of evidence, and to analyze the effects of lighting with more details. The results also show that EBD can be used to evaluate light simulations to better understand when and how they should be performed. A framework is presented for integration of lighting simulation and EBD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Design and Daylighting Performance)
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