Special Issue "Noise Control in Buildings"

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Joonhee Lee
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Concordia University
Interests: building acoustics; noise control; psychoacoustics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Noise and acoustic environments are important aspects of indoor environmental quality in buildings, as they significantly affect the comfort and performance of building occupants. New technologies are rapidly adopted in buildings these days, but less attention is being paid to their impacts on acoustic comfort. Previous studies show that noise is the most frequent complaint of new buildings in many cases. This Special Issue will therefore focus on recent noise control technologies and their applications in buildings.

I cordially invite you to this Special Issue on “Noise Control in Buildings” of the journal Buildings. Your expertise and experience in this field of work will be an excellent addition to this Special Issue. You are welcome to forward my email to your colleagues or friends who are interested in submitting papers on building acoustics and noise control to this Special Issue.

The submission deadline for this Special Issue is 31 January 2019. Topics covered include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Effect of noise on occupants’ health, comfort and performance
  • Sound insulation and absorption in buildings
  • Structure-borne and air-borne sound transmission
  • Measurement and prediction of noise in buildings
  • Innovative acoustic material
  • Sustainable acoustics
  • Machine noise in buildings
  • HVAC noise

Prof. Joonhee Lee
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Acoustic comfort
  • Sound insulation
  • Sound absorption
  • Structure-borne noise
  • HVAC noise
  • Acoustic material
  • Machine noise
  • Sustainable acoustics

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Acoustic Enhancement of a Modern Church
Buildings 2019, 9(4), 83; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings9040083 - 15 Apr 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
This paper presents the study of the intervention for the acoustic correction of a modern church. The investigated church was built in the 1960s, with a brutalist style and with a squared plan. The hard materials, including a marble floor and hard plastered [...] Read more.
This paper presents the study of the intervention for the acoustic correction of a modern church. The investigated church was built in the 1960s, with a brutalist style and with a squared plan. The hard materials, including a marble floor and hard plastered walls, were responsible for its reverberation time of over 5 s, resulting in poor speech comprehension. As common in worship spaces, the acoustic improvement interventions were challenged by the denial of covering the walls and the vault with conventional sound-absorbing materials due to aesthetic and architectural reasons. In order to carry out an adequate acoustic correction, while involving minimal interventions, the possibility of using light sound absorbing ceiling sheets was analyzed. The study is divided into three phases: Firstly, the acoustic characteristics of the current building were measured; then, new materials for adequate sound absorption were studied; finally, acoustic simulations were used to evaluate the effects on the acoustic characteristics for different intervention scenarios. The final room was able to shorten its reverberation time to about 2.0 s. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Noise Control in Buildings)
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Open AccessArticle
Characterization of New Sustainable Acoustic Solutions in a Reduced Sized Transmission Chamber
Buildings 2019, 9(3), 60; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings9030060 - 07 Mar 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
In order to assess the airborne sound insulation of a new material or building solution, access to standardized laboratories, large and expensive facilities, and a sample area of at least 10 m2 are required. At the research and development stages of new [...] Read more.
In order to assess the airborne sound insulation of a new material or building solution, access to standardized laboratories, large and expensive facilities, and a sample area of at least 10 m2 are required. At the research and development stages of new sustainable acoustic materials for construction, it is not easy to make large sample areas available. Moreover, the financial investment in acoustic testing of materials during the research stage in standardized laboratories is excessive. In this work, the assessment of the airborne sound insulation of multi-layer partitions designed with new sustainable materials is presented. The assessed solutions are formed by green composite fiber boards as lightweight elements and a new material designed from sheep wool as absorbent material. The results of these 100% recyclable solutions are compared with lightweight element based solutions, which are commonly used for acoustic insulation. Characterization of those new sustainable solutions for building is leveraged in a reduced sized transmission chamber. The design, construction, and validation of this kind of laboratory are provided. This laboratory enables the assessment of the airborne sound insulation of a material in its research stage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Noise Control in Buildings)
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Open AccessArticle
Perceived Acoustic Quality and Effect on Occupants’ Satisfaction in Green and Conventional Residential Buildings
Buildings 2019, 9(1), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings9010024 - 18 Jan 2019
Abstract
The study presented in this paper focuses on the subjective opinions of occupants of multistory residential buildings by examining the relationship between occupants’ satisfaction and indoor environment quality, and analysing the effect the problems experienced with noise level may have on general satisfaction [...] Read more.
The study presented in this paper focuses on the subjective opinions of occupants of multistory residential buildings by examining the relationship between occupants’ satisfaction and indoor environment quality, and analysing the effect the problems experienced with noise level may have on general satisfaction and the perceived acoustic quality. The analysis is based on data collected through surveys addressed to adults living in green and conventional buildings. The results show that occupants are very satisfied with their apartments, and subjectively rated acoustic quality received very high scores. The responses indicate that noise from neighbours has been experienced relatively seldom by occupants; however, the analysis shows that it is the factor that has the strongest effect on satisfaction with acoustic quality. We have found that the environmental profile of a building has a significant effect on general satisfaction expressed by occupants; however, this effect has not been confirmed for acoustic quality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Noise Control in Buildings)

Review

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Open AccessReview
Multiple-Layer Microperforated Panels as Sound Absorbers in Buildings: A Review
Buildings 2019, 9(2), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings9020053 - 25 Feb 2019
Abstract
Sound absorbing materials are used in buildings to dissipate sound energy into heat using viscous and thermal processes. Sound absorbers increase the transmission loss of walls, decrease the reverberation time of rooms, and attenuate the noise generated by internal sound sources. Porous absorbers [...] Read more.
Sound absorbing materials are used in buildings to dissipate sound energy into heat using viscous and thermal processes. Sound absorbers increase the transmission loss of walls, decrease the reverberation time of rooms, and attenuate the noise generated by internal sound sources. Porous absorbers (fibrous, cellular, or granular) are the most used materials in noise control applications because of their high performance-to-cost ratio in the frequency band of interest. However, when cleaning conditions and health reasons are of concern, microperforated panel (MPP) absorbers may be the preferred choice. MPPs, consisting of many minute (sub-millimetric) holes in a panel, are tunable absorbers in a prescribed frequency band, whose main shortcomings are high manufacturing cost and limited absorption frequency band. Currently, the production cost of MPPs can be drastically reduced by means of modern techniques. The absorption frequency band can be considerably enlarged by designing multiple-layer MPPs (ML-MPPs). The aim of this article is to review the high potential of ML-MPPs as a modern, clean, and healthy alternative to porous materials for sound absorption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Noise Control in Buildings)
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