Special Issue "Green Building Materials"

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
A/Prof. Patrick Tang

The University of Newcastle, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: buildign materials; energy efficient concrete; nanomaterials in cement-based composites; structural lightweight concrete and environmental sustainability

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Green building materials are eco-friendly and are composed of renewable, rather than non-renewable resources. They offer specific benefits to the building owner and building occupants:

  • Reduced maintenance/repair/replacement costs over the life of the building
  • Energy efficiency and conservation
  • Improved occupant health and productivity
  • Greater design and construction flexibility
  • Affordable

Using green building materials promotes conservation of dwindling non-renewable resources internationally. The integration of green building materials into building projects can also help reduce the environmental impacts associated with the extraction, transport, processing, fabrication, installation, reuse, recycling, and disposal of these building industry source materials.

The followings are the topics proposed for this special issue (but not limited to):

  • Renewable building materials
  • Reusable or reycable building materials
  • Energy-efficient building materials
  • Low embodied energy building materials
  • Durable building materials
  • Low-VOC building materials

A/Prof. Patrick Tang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Green building materials
  • Energy efficient
  • Renewable materials
  • Recycled materials
  • Embodied energy
  • Sustainable materials

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Why Not Wood? Benefits and Barriers of Wood as a Multistory Construction Material: Perceptions of Municipal Civil Servants from Finland
Buildings 2018, 8(11), 159; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings8110159
Received: 31 October 2018 / Revised: 8 November 2018 / Accepted: 9 November 2018 / Published: 13 November 2018
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Abstract
As the construction sector continues to be associated with highly energy-intensive practices leading to excessive carbon emissions, governments in many countries are promoting a shift towards greener building practices, like the use of wood in multistory construction (WMC). Meanwhile, local-government actors (e.g., municipalities)
[...] Read more.
As the construction sector continues to be associated with highly energy-intensive practices leading to excessive carbon emissions, governments in many countries are promoting a shift towards greener building practices, like the use of wood in multistory construction (WMC). Meanwhile, local-government actors (e.g., municipalities) often act as important gatekeepers of urban development given their authority to oversee or approve zoning and land-use plans. Despite this fact, they are not much focused on in existing WMC research. This qualitative interview study serves to fill a gap by studying municipal civil servant perceptions regarding WMC, using Finland as a case study. Civil servants were asked to elicit their personal opinions on WMC, and what they perceived as favorable or unfavorable about using wood as a multistory construction material. Results show increasing support for WMC, and that this is due to key benefits made possible by the technical qualities of engineered wood products in emerging WMC projects. These products permit both the adoption of rapid construction practices that enhance citizens’ quality of living, and also the sourcing of local renewable building materials that support local industries. On the other hand, barriers to the use of wood were identified, such as inadequate information distribution, a limited number of WMC industry actors, and inefficient policy measures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Building Materials)
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Open AccessArticle Durability and Compressive Strength of High Cement Replacement Ratio Self-Consolidating Concrete
Buildings 2018, 8(11), 153; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings8110153
Received: 27 September 2018 / Revised: 1 November 2018 / Accepted: 2 November 2018 / Published: 6 November 2018
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Abstract
This study examines durability and mechanical properties of sustainable self-consolidating concrete (SCC) in which 80% of the cement is replaced with combinations of recycled industrial by-products including fly ash, silica fume, and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS). The water to binder (w/b)
[...] Read more.
This study examines durability and mechanical properties of sustainable self-consolidating concrete (SCC) in which 80% of the cement is replaced with combinations of recycled industrial by-products including fly ash, silica fume, and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS). The water to binder (w/b) ratio of SCC mixes studies was maintained at 0.36. The study proposes empirical relationships to predict 28-day compressive strengths based on the results of three-day and seven-day compressive strengths. In addition, the chloride penetration resistance of the various sustainable SCC mixes was determined after three days, seven days, and 28 days of moist curing of concrete standards. It was concluded that fly ash, silica fume, and GGBS contribute favorably to enhancing strength development, fresh properties, and durability of SCC in comparison to ordinary Portland cement (OPC). The compressive strength of the sustainable SCC mixes falls within ranges suitable for structural engineering applications. Replacing cement with 15% silica fume produced a 28-day average compressive strength of 95.3 MPa, which is 44.2% higher than the control mix. Replacing cement with 15% or 20% silica fume reduced the chloride ion permeability to very low amounts compared to high permeability in a control mix. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Building Materials)
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Open AccessArticle Preparation and Characterization of Plasters with Photodegradative Action
Buildings 2018, 8(9), 122; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings8090122
Received: 26 July 2018 / Revised: 27 August 2018 / Accepted: 30 August 2018 / Published: 3 September 2018
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Abstract
The aim of this project is to investigate the behaviour of several special types plasters specifically designed to degrade the most common pollutants which are present in the atmosphere. In particular, specific additives have been added to these plasters, in order to obtain
[...] Read more.
The aim of this project is to investigate the behaviour of several special types plasters specifically designed to degrade the most common pollutants which are present in the atmosphere. In particular, specific additives have been added to these plasters, in order to obtain a broad spectrum of active and synergic response, each of which have peculiar functions: - microporous materials, such as clinoptilolite, a natural zeolite, that promotes the adsorption of air pollutants thanks to its porous nature; - nano-fillers, such as carbon nanotubes, that behave both as reinforcing agents as well as adsorbent materials; - photochemical agents, such as titanium oxide, that degrade air pollutants, previously adsorbed on carbon nanotubes and zeolites, thanks to the action of light that activates photodegradation reactions. All the samples were also characterized in terms of mechanical properties, adhesion to supports and water absorption. Furthermore, photodegradation tests were carried out by exposing plaster surfaces, wetted with a Rodamine solution, to Ultraviolet rays (UV) for different times. Plasters photodegradative capacity was evaluated and the results highlighted the fact that the designed admixtures showed an important photodegradative action, strictly dependent on the types and specific ratios of the selected additives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Building Materials)
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Open AccessArticle Daylight Performance of a Translucent Textile Membrane Roof with Thermal Insulation
Buildings 2018, 8(9), 118; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings8090118
Received: 29 July 2018 / Revised: 17 August 2018 / Accepted: 20 August 2018 / Published: 24 August 2018
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Abstract
Daylight usage in buildings improves visual comfort and lowers the final energy demand for artificial lighting. The question that always occurs is how much conservation can be achieved? New or rare materials and constructions have a lack of information about their application. Therefore,
[...] Read more.
Daylight usage in buildings improves visual comfort and lowers the final energy demand for artificial lighting. The question that always occurs is how much conservation can be achieved? New or rare materials and constructions have a lack of information about their application. Therefore, the current investigation quantifies the daylight and energy performance of a rare multi-layer textile membrane roof. A translucent, thermal insulation with a glass fibre fleece between the two roof membranes combines daylight usage and heating demand reduction. A sports hall built in 2017 is used as a case study building with 2300 m2 membrane roof surface. The optical properties of the roof construction were measured with a total visual light transmittance τv of 0.72% for a clean surface. A climate-based annual daylight modelling delivers daylight indicators for different construction scenarios. The results show that, in comparison to only one glass façade, the additional translucent and thermally insulated membrane roof construction increases the annual daylight autonomy (DA700) from 0% to 1.5% and the continuous DA700 from 15% to 38%. In the roof-covered areas of the sport field, this results in a 30% reduction of the electricity demand for artificial lighting from 19.7 kWhel/m2/a to 13.8 kWhel/m2/a, when a dimming control is used. The study also found that the influence of the soiling of one layer decreases its light transmittance by a factor 0.81. Two soiled layers lower τv by a factor of 0.66 to 0.47%. This increases the electricity demand for lighting by only 12%. The results should be very valuable as a comparison and benchmark for planners and future buildings of a similar type. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Building Materials)
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