Research on the Construction Mechanical Behavior and Deformation Characteristics of Lining Structure—2nd Edition

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Structures".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 1258

Special Issue Editors

School of Civil Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031, China
Interests: tunnel and underground engineering; construction mechanics of large and complex underground structures; research and development of underground engineering construction machinery and equipment; selection and intelligent control of tunnel construction equipment in extreme environments; application of renewable fiber materials in concrete lining structures
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Xihua University, Chengdu 610039, China
Interests: structure system and deformation control of tunnels in complex and unfavorable geological environments with weak surrounding rocks; foundation pit support structures
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Lining is a permanent support structure constructed with reinforced concrete and other materials around the tunnel body to prevent the deformation or collapse of surrounding rock.

With the huge demand for transportation and thus the rapid development of tunnels and other underground engineering construction technologies, some tunnels that are operating have entered the life cycle of closure and repair. As a support structure, lining has been confirmed to play an important role in engineering construction, operation, and maintenance.

This Special Issue encourages all professionals, researchers, managers, and planners engaged in the construction, operation, and maintenance of civil engineering, tunnels, and corresponding underground engineering, to share their projects.

Dr. Heng Zhang
Dr. Huayun Li
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • tunnel engineering
  • underground engineering
  • construction mechanics
  • lining structure
  • support parameters
  • deformation control
  • surrounding rock characteristics

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

17 pages, 22841 KiB  
Article
Research on Rock-Breaking Characteristics of Cutters and Matching of Cutter Spacing and Penetration for Tunnel Boring Machine
by Huipeng Zhang, Ming Xia, Fengyuan Huang and Zhiqiang Zhang
Buildings 2024, 14(6), 1757; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14061757 - 11 Jun 2024
Viewed by 177
Abstract
Tunnel boring machine (TBM) tunnel construction in composite strata relies heavily on understanding the rock-breaking characteristics of TBM cutters and optimizing cutter spacing and penetration. Utilizing a full-scale rock rotary cutting machine (RCM), this study conducted rock-breaking tests with disc cutters under varying [...] Read more.
Tunnel boring machine (TBM) tunnel construction in composite strata relies heavily on understanding the rock-breaking characteristics of TBM cutters and optimizing cutter spacing and penetration. Utilizing a full-scale rock rotary cutting machine (RCM), this study conducted rock-breaking tests with disc cutters under varying rolling radii. An analysis of rock debris shape and cutter behavior provided insights into rock-breaking mechanisms. Two main types of rock fragments were identified, with both shear and compression failure observed during cutter–rock interactions. The influence of the rolling radius and cutter spacing on cutter forces was analyzed, along with numerical modeling using the particle flow method. Optimal cutter selection in soft–hard composite strata should prioritize cutter force, with the greatest force required in hard rock. Cutter force increases with penetration, while the force difference between cutters decreases with reduced cutter spacing. These findings offer practical guidance for efficient rock-breaking in composite geological formations during tunnel construction. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 1881 KiB  
Article
Study on the Effect of Natural Wind on the Smoke Spread Law of Extra-Long Tunnel Fires with Inclined Shafts for Air Supply and Exhaust
by Yinjun Tan, Keli Wang, Zhiqiang Zhang, Zeyi Lu and Heng Zhang
Buildings 2024, 14(6), 1516; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14061516 - 23 May 2024
Viewed by 379
Abstract
High-temperature smoke generated by tunnel fires is the most important factor causing casualties. To explore the influence of natural wind on fire smoke movement in an extra-long highway tunnel based on the Taihang Mountain Tunnel, the distribution law of natural wind in the [...] Read more.
High-temperature smoke generated by tunnel fires is the most important factor causing casualties. To explore the influence of natural wind on fire smoke movement in an extra-long highway tunnel based on the Taihang Mountain Tunnel, the distribution law of natural wind in the tunnel was obtained by on-site monitoring of the meteorological conditions at the tunnel site. A three-dimensional fire dynamics tunnel model considering an inclined shaft smoke exhaust was established, and the influence of natural wind on tunnel temperature distribution, smoke spread and smoke exhaust efficiency was studied. The results show that the natural wind speed of the Taihang Mountain Tunnel is mainly concentrated at 0~3 m/s. The main wind direction of the natural wind on the left tunnel is opposite to the driving direction, and the distribution probability of the main wind direction in each section is 81.27% and 72.15%, respectively. The main wind direction of the right tunnel is the same as the driving direction, and the distribution probability of the main wind direction in each section is 56.78%, 69.73%, 67.32% and 64.65%, respectively. The negative natural wind can inhibit the smoke spread downstream of the smoke exhaust port, but it is not conducive to the smoke exhaust. The positive natural wind promotes the smoke spread to the downstream of the smoke exhaust port, and the larger the natural wind speed, the longer the spread length. Natural wind reduces the smoke exhaust efficiency. For positive or negative natural wind with a guaranteed rate of 70%, the smoke exhaust efficiency is reduced by 27.76% and 15.59%, respectively, compared with the condition without natural wind. The research results can provide a useful reference for the design of fire smoke exhausts and smoke control schemes in extra-long highway tunnels. Full article

Other

Jump to: Research

14 pages, 6810 KiB  
Technical Note
Innovative Approaches and Challenges in the Demolition of Large-Span Post-Tensioned Beams: Insights from a Case Study
by Mohammad Jonaidi, Adam Kaplan and Ali Keyvanfar
Buildings 2024, 14(5), 1380; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14051380 - 11 May 2024
Viewed by 493
Abstract
Large-span, post-tensioned (PT) beams play a crucial role in maximizing the benefits of post-tensioning techniques. Bonded and unbonded systems are prevalent, with the latter being more widespread in the United States. While bonded systems are advantageous for creating long spans when multiple tendons [...] Read more.
Large-span, post-tensioned (PT) beams play a crucial role in maximizing the benefits of post-tensioning techniques. Bonded and unbonded systems are prevalent, with the latter being more widespread in the United States. While bonded systems are advantageous for creating long spans when multiple tendons are grouped in ducts, limited studies in the literature exist on their demolition. With a case study, this paper addresses the unique challenge of demolishing large-span-bonded, post-tensioned beams that occurs due to a building’s functional change. Emphasizing insights for engineers, it explores the use of cutting and dismantling methods, thereby considering the presence of prestressed cables. The demolition process is distinctive due to the presence of numerous prestressed cables along the beams, necessitating a specialized and cautious cutting approach. This is accomplished through the use of a drilling technique that selectively distresses the tendons, ensuring they are not all affected simultaneously. An intriguing observation discussed in this paper pertains to the occurrence of horizontal cracks accompanied by loud sounds following the drilling process, thereby offering insights from the design perspective of PT systems. This paper details an innovative method for safely demolishing large-span, bonded PT beams using ground-penetrating radar and computer models to navigate structural complexities and ensure nearby structures’ safety. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop