Topical Collection "Collection on Neural Engineering"

A topical collection in Brain Sciences (ISSN 2076-3425). This collection belongs to the section "Neural Engineering".

Editor

Dr. Caterina Cinel
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Brain-Computer Interfaces and Neural Engineering Laboratory, School of Computer Science and Electonic Engineering, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester, CO4 3SQ, UK
Interests: multisensory integration; visual feature integration; attention; EEG; brain-computer interfaces; decision making; transcranial current stimulation; autobiographical memory
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

The aim of this section is to publish cutting-edge research in the highly interdisciplinary area of Neural Engineering. The scope is very broad: from advances in materials, techniques, and technologies for interfacing neurons with artificial devices; to discoveries in brain research and foundations for future neuroprostethics, interfaces, and cognitive augmentation; and from neural modelling to nanotechnologies. We therefore invite original contributions on a wide range of topics, including (but not limited to) brain-machine interfaces, neuregonomics, neural interfaces, nanotechnology, circuits and materials, neural prostheses, neurorehabilitation, neural decoding and encoding algorithms, neural computation and modeling, neural imaging, and neuroethics.

Dr. Caterina Cinel
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Brain Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • brain-machine and brain-computer interfaces
  • neuregonomics central and peripheral neural interfaces
  • nanotechnology
  • neuroprostheses
  • neurorehabilitation
  • neural decoding and encoding algorithms
  • neural computation and modeling
  • neurtechnologies for cognitive augmentaion
  • neuroethics

Published Papers (3 papers)

2019

Open AccessArticle
Increased Voluntary Activation of the Elbow Flexors Following a Single Session of Spinal Manipulation in a Subclinical Neck Pain Population
Brain Sci. 2019, 9(6), 136; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci9060136 - 12 Jun 2019
Abstract
To investigate the effects of a single session of spinal manipulation (SM) on voluntary activation of the elbow flexors in participants with subclinical neck pain using an interpolated twitch technique with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), eighteen volunteers with subclinical neck pain participated in [...] Read more.
To investigate the effects of a single session of spinal manipulation (SM) on voluntary activation of the elbow flexors in participants with subclinical neck pain using an interpolated twitch technique with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), eighteen volunteers with subclinical neck pain participated in this randomized crossover trial. TMS was delivered during elbow flexion contractions at 50%, 75% and 100% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) before and after SM or control intervention. The amplitude of the superimposed twitches evoked during voluntary contractions was recorded and voluntary activation was calculated using a regression analysis. Dependent variables were analyzed with two-way (intervention × time) repeated measures ANOVAs. Significant intervention effects for SM compared to passive movement control were observed for elbow flexion MVC (p = 0.04), the amplitude of superimposed twitch (p = 0.04), and voluntary activation of elbow flexors (p =0.03). Significant within-group post-intervention changes were observed for the superimposed twitch (mean group decrease of 20.9%, p < 0.01) and voluntary activation (mean group increase of 3.0%, p < 0.01) following SM. No other significant within-group changes were observed. Voluntary activation of the elbow flexors increased immediately after one session of spinal manipulation in participants with subclinical neck pain. A decrease in the amplitude of superimposed twitch during elbow flexion MVC following spinal manipulation suggests a facilitation of motor cortical output. Full article
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Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Self-Paced Online vs. Cue-Based Offline Brain–Computer Interfaces for Inducing Neural Plasticity
Brain Sci. 2019, 9(6), 127; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci9060127 - 01 Jun 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Brain–computer interfaces (BCIs), operated in a cue-based (offline) or self-paced (online) mode, can be used for inducing cortical plasticity for stroke rehabilitation by the pairing of movement-related brain activity with peripheral electrical stimulation. The aim of this study was to compare the difference [...] Read more.
Brain–computer interfaces (BCIs), operated in a cue-based (offline) or self-paced (online) mode, can be used for inducing cortical plasticity for stroke rehabilitation by the pairing of movement-related brain activity with peripheral electrical stimulation. The aim of this study was to compare the difference in cortical plasticity induced by the two BCI modes. Fifteen healthy participants participated in two experimental sessions: cue-based BCI and self-paced BCI. In both sessions, imagined dorsiflexions were extracted from continuous electroencephalogram (EEG) and paired 50 times with the electrical stimulation of the common peroneal nerve. Before, immediately after, and 30 min after each intervention, the cortical excitability was measured through the motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) of tibialis anterior elicited through transcranial magnetic stimulation. Linear mixed regression models showed that the MEP amplitudes increased significantly (p < 0.05) from pre- to post- and 30-min post-intervention in terms of both the absolute and relative units, regardless of the intervention type. Compared to pre-interventions, the absolute MEP size increased by 79% in post- and 68% in 30-min post-intervention in the self-paced mode (with a true positive rate of ~75%), and by 37% in post- and 55% in 30-min post-intervention in the cue-based mode. The two modes were significantly different (p = 0.03) at post-intervention (relative units) but were similar at both post timepoints (absolute units). These findings suggest that immediate changes in cortical excitability may have implications for stroke rehabilitation, where it could be used as a priming protocol in conjunction with another intervention; however, the findings need to be validated in studies involving stroke patients. Full article
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Open AccessCase Report
Wireless Computer-Supported Cooperative Work: A Pilot Experiment on Art and Brain–Computer Interfaces
Brain Sci. 2019, 9(4), 94; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci9040094 - 25 Apr 2019
Abstract
The present case study looked into the feasibility of using brain–computer interface (BCI) technology combined with computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) in a wireless network. We had two objectives; first, to test the wireless BCI-based configuration and the practical use of this idea we [...] Read more.
The present case study looked into the feasibility of using brain–computer interface (BCI) technology combined with computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) in a wireless network. We had two objectives; first, to test the wireless BCI-based configuration and the practical use of this idea we assessed workload perception in participants located several kilometers apart taking part in the same drawing task. Second, we studied the cortical activation patterns of participants performing the drawing task with and without the BCI technology. Results showed higher mental workload perception and broader cortical activation (frontal-temporal-occipital) under BCI experimental conditions. This idea shows a possible application of BCI research in the social field, where two or more users could engage in a computer networking task using BCI technology over the internet. New research avenues for CSCW are discussed and possibilities for future research are given. Full article
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Figure 1

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