Special Issue "Music-Based Therapies and Interventions in Clinical Settings across the Life Span—New Methodological, Clinical and Technological Avenues"

A special issue of Brain Sciences (ISSN 2076-3425). This special issue belongs to the section "Neurorehabilitation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Artur C. Jaschke
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
1. Department of Music Therapy, ArtEZ University of the Arts, 7511 PN Enschede, The Netherlands
2. Department of Neonatology, Beatrix Children's Hospital, University Medical Centre Groningen, 9713 GZ Groningen, The Netherlands
Interests: neuroscience; clinical neuromusicology; music-based therapies and interventions; music technology; neuropsychology; pediatrics
Dr. Annemieke Vink
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Music Therapy, ArtEZ University of the Arts, 7511 PN Enschede, The Netherlands
Interests: (music) psychology; elderly care
Camila Pfeiffer
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Music Therapy, ArtEZ University of the Arts, 7511 PN Enschede, The Netherlands
Interests: adult-care and clinical Music Therapy interventions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Music therapy and music-based interventions have received increasing interest in recent decades. In addition to clinical and intervention studies, there has been an increasing number of studies investigating the effects of music on the brain. Of note are active participation and music making in clinical and nonclinical populations. Even though there is a wealth of data already gained in neuromusicological research, more research is needed into the neural, psychosocial, and clinical aspects and influences of music and how music (therapy) can be protocolized, implemented, and assessed in clinical populations. Clinical neuroscience offers methodological access to studying social interaction processes in therapeutic domains by blending richness, ecological validity, and contextual factors of real-world designs. In order to do so, there is a growing demand in amalgamating neuroscience, musicology, medicine, as well as novel technological approaches. This combination increasingly utilizes clinical, neural, and physical data related to music-based therapies and interventions and clinical settings at large.

Therefore, this Special Issue will investigate the state of the art in music therapy across pediatric, adult, and elderly populations, inherently aiming at the utilization of new and innovative paradigms in music-based therapies and interventions and their implication for clinical, educational, and neuro(a)typical population.

We welcome original research and clinical trials, theoretical papers, reviews (systematic and meta-analyses), clinical protocols, feasibility and pilot studies, brief reports, as well as future prospect reviews.

Prof. Dr. Artur Jaschke (Paediatrics)
Guest Editors

Dr. Annemieke Vink (Elderly Care)
Camila Pfeiffer (Adult Care)
Co-Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Brain Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pediatrics and music-based therapies and interventions
  • adult care and music-based therapies and interventions
  • elderly care and music-based therapies and interventions
  • clinical music therapy
  • clinical neuromusicology
  • clinical music cognition and psychology
  • music technology in music therapy and intervention

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Conventional and Algorithmic Music Listening before Radiotherapy Treatment: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(12), 1618; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11121618 - 08 Dec 2021
Viewed by 372
Abstract
Music listening is a widespread approach in the field of music therapy. In this study, the effects of music listening on anxiety and stress in patients undergoing radiotherapy are investigated. Sixty patients with breast cancer who were candidates for postoperative curative radiotherapy were [...] Read more.
Music listening is a widespread approach in the field of music therapy. In this study, the effects of music listening on anxiety and stress in patients undergoing radiotherapy are investigated. Sixty patients with breast cancer who were candidates for postoperative curative radiotherapy were recruited and randomly assigned to three groups: Melomics-Health (MH) group (music listening algorithmically created, n = 20); individualized music listening (IML) group (playlist of preferred music, n = 20); no music group (n = 20). Music listening was administered for 15 min immediately before simulation and during the first five radiotherapy sessions. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the Psychological Distress Inventory (PDI) were administered before/after treatment. Cochran’s Q test and McNemar test for paired proportions were performed to evaluate if the proportion of subjects having an outcome score below the critical value by treatment and over time was different, and if there was a change in that proportion. The MH group improved in STAI and PDI. The IML group worsened in STAI at T1 and improved STAI-Trait at T2. The IML group worsened in PDI at T2. The No music group generally improved in STAI and PDI. Clinical and music listening-related implications are discussed defining possible research perspectives in this field. Full article
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Article
Clinical and Neural Predictors of Treatment Response to Music Listening Intervention after Stroke
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(12), 1576; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11121576 - 29 Nov 2021
Viewed by 370
Abstract
Patients with post-stroke impairments present often significant variation in response to therapeutic interventions. Recent studies have shown that daily music listening can aid post-stroke recovery of language and memory, but reliable predictors of treatment response are unknown. Utilizing data from the music intervention [...] Read more.
Patients with post-stroke impairments present often significant variation in response to therapeutic interventions. Recent studies have shown that daily music listening can aid post-stroke recovery of language and memory, but reliable predictors of treatment response are unknown. Utilizing data from the music intervention arms of a single-blind randomized controlled trial (RCT) on stroke patients (N = 31), we built regression models to predict the treatment response of a two-month music listening intervention on language skills and verbal memory with baseline demographic, clinical and musical data as well as fMRI data from a music listening task. Clinically, greater improvement in verbal memory and language skills after the music listening intervention were predicted by the severity of the initial deficit and educational level. Neurally, greater baseline fMRI activation during vocal music listening in the left parietal cortical and medial frontal areas predicted greater treatment-induced improvement in language skills and greater baseline engagement of the auditory network during instrumental music listening predicted improvement in both verbal memory and language skills. Our results suggest that clinical, demographic, and neuroimaging data predicts music listening treatment response. This data could be used clinically to target music-based treatments. Full article
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Article
Key Challenges and Future Directions When Running Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) Research Protocols with Newborns: A Music and Language EEG Feasibility Study
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(12), 1562; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11121562 - 26 Nov 2021
Viewed by 390
Abstract
Although many musical intervention studies exist in the wider framework of neuroscience and psychology, the preliminary importance of feasibility studies is rarely discussed. Adding to this fact the limited research existing on the therapeutic and restorative potential of music exposure during early developmental [...] Read more.
Although many musical intervention studies exist in the wider framework of neuroscience and psychology, the preliminary importance of feasibility studies is rarely discussed. Adding to this fact the limited research existing on the therapeutic and restorative potential of music exposure during early developmental periods, pushed us to concentrate on investigating newborns’ perception of music and its impact on the brain. Here, we explore the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) approach when measuring and comparing the neurophysiological perception of music versus language on the brainstem of newborns using auditory brainstem response (ABR). Twenty-five healthy full-term infants were recruited, eight of which were measured within their first 10 days postpartum. The evaluation of the study’s feasibility appealed to five main objectives that essentially answer the question: Can our protocol work? Each objective proposes questions based on Orsmond and Cohn’s guiding framework, designed to assess, and assist feasibility in understanding barriers toward a study’s success. Our results justify that newborns are well capable of undergoing the study and given meticulous considerations and improvements on the intervention resources. The procedure’s communication and technical obstacles are resoluble. Moreover, assimilation of external factors to adapt, such as the culture variation and the ABR protocol implementation are necessary. The study was well received in the selected region (Middle East), and the recording procedure showed potential outcomes for a comprehensive RCT. Full article
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