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Study Protocol

Home-Based Music Therapy to Support Bulbar and Respiratory Functions of Persons with Early and Mid-Stage Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis—Protocol and Results from a Feasibility Study

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ALSMusicTherapy.Org, 115419 Moscow, Russia
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Bujanov Moscow City Clinical Hospital, 115419 Moscow, Russia
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Institute of Higher Nervous Activity and Neurophysiology, 115419 Moscow, Russia
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Moscow Research and Clinical Center for Neuropsychiatry, 115419 Moscow, Russia
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Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA 02129-4557, USA
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Clinical and Research Institute of Emergency Pediatric Surgery and Trauma, 119180 Moscow, Russia
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Faculty of Health, Education, Medicine & Social Care, School of Medicine, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge CM1 1SQ, UK
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Music, Health and the Brain, Cambridge Institute for Music Therapy Research, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge CM1 1SQ, UK
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Artur C. Jaschke, Annemieke Vink and Camila Pfeiffer
Brain Sci. 2022, 12(4), 494; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci12040494
Received: 10 March 2022 / Revised: 1 April 2022 / Accepted: 6 April 2022 / Published: 13 April 2022
Respiratory failure, malnutrition, aspiration pneumonia, and dehydration are the precursors to mortality in ALS. Loss of natural communication is considered one of the worst aspects of ALS. This first study to test the feasibility of a music therapy protocol for bulbar and respiratory rehabilitation in ALS employs a mixed-methods case study series design with repeated measures. Newly diagnosed patients meeting the inclusion criteria were invited to participate, until the desired sample size (n = 8) was achieved. The protocol was delivered to participants in their homes twice weekly for six weeks. Individualised exercise sets for independent practice were provided. Feasibility data (recruitment, retention, adherence, tolerability, self-motivation and personal impressions) were collected. Bulbar and respiratory changes were objectively measured. Results. A high recruitment rate (100%), a high retention rate (87.5%) and high mean adherence to treatment (95.4%) provide evidence for the feasibility of the study protocol. The treatment was well tolerated. Mean adherence to the suggested independent exercise routine was 53%. The outcome measurements to evaluate the therapy-induced change in bulbar and respiratory functions were defined. Findings suggest that the protocol is safe to use in early- and mid-stage ALS and that music therapy was beneficial for the participants’ bulbar and respiratory functions. Mean trends suggesting that these functions were sustained or improved during the treatment period were observed for most outcome parameters: Maximal Inspiratory Pressure, Maximal Expiratory Pressure, Peak Expiratory Flow, the Center for Neurologic Study—Bulbar Function Scale speech and swallowing subscales, Maximum Phonation Time, Maximum Repetition Rate—Alternating, Maximum Repetition Rate—Sequential, Jitter, Shimmer, NHR, Speaking rate, Speech–pause ratio, Pause frequency, hypernasality level, Time-to-Laryngeal Vestibule Closure, Maximum Pharyngeal Constriction Area, Peak Position of the Hyoid Bone, Total Pharyngeal Residue C24area. Conclusion. The suggested design and protocol are feasible for a larger study, with some modifications, including aerodynamic measure of nasalance, abbreviated voice sampling and psychological screening. View Full-Text
Keywords: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); motor neurone disease (MND); bulbar; respiratory training; speech; swallowing; cough; communication; music therapy; music; rehabilitation; palliative amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); motor neurone disease (MND); bulbar; respiratory training; speech; swallowing; cough; communication; music therapy; music; rehabilitation; palliative
MDPI and ACS Style

Apreleva Kolomeytseva, A.T.; Brylev, L.; Eshghi, M.; Bottaeva, Z.; Zhang, J.; Fachner, J.C.; Street, A.J. Home-Based Music Therapy to Support Bulbar and Respiratory Functions of Persons with Early and Mid-Stage Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis—Protocol and Results from a Feasibility Study. Brain Sci. 2022, 12, 494. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci12040494

AMA Style

Apreleva Kolomeytseva AT, Brylev L, Eshghi M, Bottaeva Z, Zhang J, Fachner JC, Street AJ. Home-Based Music Therapy to Support Bulbar and Respiratory Functions of Persons with Early and Mid-Stage Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis—Protocol and Results from a Feasibility Study. Brain Sciences. 2022; 12(4):494. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci12040494

Chicago/Turabian Style

Apreleva Kolomeytseva, Alisa T., Lev Brylev, Marziye Eshghi, Zhanna Bottaeva, Jufen Zhang, Jörg C. Fachner, and Alexander J. Street. 2022. "Home-Based Music Therapy to Support Bulbar and Respiratory Functions of Persons with Early and Mid-Stage Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis—Protocol and Results from a Feasibility Study" Brain Sciences 12, no. 4: 494. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci12040494

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