Special Issue "Exercising against Age-Effects on the Brain"

A special issue of Brain Sciences (ISSN 2076-3425). This special issue belongs to the section "Cognitive Neuroscience".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 July 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Notger G. Müller

1. German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Neuroprotect Lab, Magdeburg, Germany;
2. Center for Behavioral Brain Sciences, Magdeburg, Germany;
3. Otto von Guericke University, Medical Faculty, Dpt. of Neurolgy Magdeburg, Germany.
Website | E-Mail
Interests: dementia prevention; early diagnosis; cognitive interactions; training; neurophysiology
Guest Editor
Dr. Patrick Müller

1. German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Neuroprotection Lab, Magdeburg, Germany;
2. Otto von Guericke University, Medical Faculty, Magdeburg, Germany.
Website | E-Mail
Interests: physical activity; personalized medicine; non-pharmacological interventions; neuroplasticity
Guest Editor
Mr. Fabian Herold

German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Neuroprotection Lab, Magdeburg, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: physical activity; strength training; resistance training; motor-cognitive training; personalized training; cognition; functional near-infrared spectroscopy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The interaction of physical activity and cognitive function with respect what we now call successful aging was and is extensively studied. In general, a wealth of studies indicate that short- and long-term physical activity can induce neuroplasticity even in the adult brain, affects cognitive performance positively and may reduce the risk of neurodegenerative dementia, a disease for which advanced age is the main risk factor.

However, the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of physical activity on the human central nervous systems are not fully understood. A deeper understanding of the effects of physical activity on molecular, structural and functional brain changes seems urgently needed since this would allow us to develop more efficient prevention strategies to influence the maladaptive processes of aging on brain functioning. The great potential to influence neurobiological processes throughout physical activity is of substantial scientific and public interest when considering the consequences of age-related cognitive decline in conjunction with the demographic change.

As Guest Editors of this Special Issue, “Exercising against Age-Effects on the Brain” we are excited to receive a number of interesting articles in this field.

Prof. Dr. Notger G. Müller
Dr. Patrick Müller
Mr. Fabian Herold
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Brain Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 850 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Physical activity
  • Cognition
  • Neurobiological mechanisms
  • Dementia
  • Aging
  • Neuroplasticity

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Superior Effects of Modified Chen-Style Tai Chi versus 24-Style Tai Chi on Cognitive Function, Fitness, and Balance Performance in Adults over 55
Brain Sci. 2019, 9(5), 102; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci9050102
Received: 11 April 2019 / Revised: 2 May 2019 / Accepted: 3 May 2019 / Published: 4 May 2019
PDF Full-text (2237 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Background: Cognitive decline and balance impairment are prevalent in the aging population. Previous studies investigated the beneficial effects of 24-style Tai Chi (TC-24) on either cognitive function or balance performance of older adults. It still remains largely unknown whether modified Chen-style TC (MTC) [...] Read more.
Background: Cognitive decline and balance impairment are prevalent in the aging population. Previous studies investigated the beneficial effects of 24-style Tai Chi (TC-24) on either cognitive function or balance performance of older adults. It still remains largely unknown whether modified Chen-style TC (MTC) that includes 18 complex movements is more beneficial for these age-related health outcomes, as compared to TC-24. Objective: We investigated if MTC would show greater effects than TC-24 on global cognitive function and balance-related outcomes among older adults. Methods: We conducted a randomized trial where 80 eligible adults aged over 55 were allocated into two different styles of Tai Chi (TC) arms (sixty-minute session × three times per week, 12 weeks). Outcome assessments were performed at three time periods (baseline, Week 6, and Week 12) and included the Chinese Version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) for overall cognitive function, One-leg Standing Test (LST) for static balance, Timed Up and Go Test (TUGT) for dynamic balance, chair Stand Test (CST) for leg power, and the six-meter Walk Test (6MWT) for aerobic exercise capacity. Results: Compared to TC-24 arm, MTC arm demonstrated significantly greater improvements in MoCA, LST, TUGT, CST, and 6MWT (all p < 0.05). Conclusions: Both forms of TC were effective in enhancing global cognitive function, balance, and fitness. Furthermore, MTC was more effective than TC-24 in enhancing these health-related parameters in an aging population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exercising against Age-Effects on the Brain)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Working Memory, Cognitive Load and Cardiorespiratory Fitness: Testing the CRUNCH Model with Near-Infrared Spectroscopy
Brain Sci. 2019, 9(2), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci9020038
Received: 27 December 2018 / Revised: 1 February 2019 / Accepted: 6 February 2019 / Published: 9 February 2019
PDF Full-text (1682 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The present study aimed to examine the effects of chronological age and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) on cognitive performance and prefrontal cortex activity, and to test the compensation-related utilization of neural circuits hypothesis (CRUNCH). A total of 19 young adults (18–22 years) and 37 [...] Read more.
The present study aimed to examine the effects of chronological age and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) on cognitive performance and prefrontal cortex activity, and to test the compensation-related utilization of neural circuits hypothesis (CRUNCH). A total of 19 young adults (18–22 years) and 37 older ones (60–77 years) with a high or low CRF level were recruited to perform a working memory updating task under three different cognitive load conditions. Prefrontal cortex hemodynamic responses were continuously recorded using functional near-infrared spectroscopy, and behavioral performances and perceived difficulty were measured. Results showed that chronological age had deleterious effects on both cognitive performance and prefrontal cortex activation under a higher cognitive load. In older adults, however, higher levels of CRF were related to increased bilateral prefrontal cortex activation patterns that allowed them to sustain better cognitive performances, especially under the highest cognitive load. These results are discussed in the light of the neurocognitive CRUNCH model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exercising against Age-Effects on the Brain)
Figures

Figure 1

Brain Sci. EISSN 2076-3425 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top