Special Issue "Spectroscopy-Based Biosensors"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Annalisa De Girolamo
Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Sciences of Food Production, National Research Council of Italy (CNR), Bari 70126, Italy
Interests: vibrational spectroscopy; chromatographic methods; rapid/innovative methods; chemometric analysis; method development and validation; food quality/safety/authenticity
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Vincenzo Lippolis
Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Sciences of Food Production, National Research Council of Italy (CNR), Bari 70126, Italy
Interests: fluorescence polarization spectroscopy; chromatographic methods; rapid/innovative methods; method development and validation; food quality/safety/authenticity
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Chris Maragos
Website
Guest Editor
Mycotoxin Prevention and Applied Microbiology Research Unit, National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research, Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Peoria, IL 61604, USA
Interests: biosensor; immunosensor; biolayer interferometry; fluorescence polarization; surface plasmon resonance; ambient ionization mass spectrometry; antibodies; aptamers; imprinted polymers; natural toxins; commodities; food; feed

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biosensors represent a growing analytical tool with a wide field of application. Compactness, portability, high specificity, and sensitivity are some reasons why biosensors are considered to have a high potential for replacing current analytical practices. Among biosensors, those based on spectroscopy represent the major group and display features that can make them advantageous over other biosensor devices. Some examples of spectroscopic-based biosensors include absorption spectroscopy, Raman and conventional fluorescence spectroscopy, imaging, surface plasmon resonance, evanescent wave and infrared spectroscopy, fiber optic spectroscopy, luminescence, fluorescence polarization and energy transfer. Antibodies, aptamers, peptides or bio-mimetic recognition elements, are some examples of biorecognition elements for target molecule detection.

The Biosensors Special Issue “Spectroscopy-Based Biosensors” is intended to be a timely and comprehensive issue on very recent and emerging biosensor concepts and technologies. Papers with applications in food will be also highly appreciated.

We cordially invite you to submit research papers, short communications and reviews to share your work with our readers.

Dr. Annalisa De Girolamo
Dr. Vincenzo Lippolis
Dr. Chris Maragos
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biosensor
  • Spectroscopy
  • Surface plasmon resonance
  • Localized surface plasmon resonance
  • Interferometry
  • Biolayer interferometry
  • Luminescence
  • Fluorescence polarization
  • ELISA
  • Optical fiber sensor
  • Food monitoring
  • Environmental monitoring
  • Commodities
  • Multiplexed sensing

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
A Critical Comparison between Flow-through and Lateral Flow Immunoassay Formats for Visual and Smartphone-Based Multiplex Allergen Detection
Biosensors 2019, 9(4), 143; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9040143 - 12 Dec 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
(1) Background: The lack of globally standardized allergen labeling legislation necessitates consumer-focused multiplexed testing devices. These should be easy to operate, fast, sensitive and robust. (2) Methods: Herein, we describe the development of three different formats for multiplexed food allergen detection, namely active [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The lack of globally standardized allergen labeling legislation necessitates consumer-focused multiplexed testing devices. These should be easy to operate, fast, sensitive and robust. (2) Methods: Herein, we describe the development of three different formats for multiplexed food allergen detection, namely active and passive flow-through assays, and lateral flow immunoassays with different test line configurations. (3) Results: The fastest assay time was 1 min, whereas even the slowest assay was within 10 min. With the passive flow approach, the limits of detection (LOD) of 0.1 and 0.5 ppm for total hazelnut protein (THP) and total peanut protein (TPP) in spiked buffer were reached, or 1 and 5 ppm of THP and TPP spiked into matrix. In comparison, the active flow approach reached LODs of 0.05 ppm for both analytes in buffer and 0.5 and 1 ppm of THP and TPP spiked into matrix. The optimized LFIA configuration reached LODs of 0.1 and 0.5 ppm of THP and TPP spiked into buffer or 0.5 ppm for both analytes spiked into matrix. The optimized LFIA was validated by testing in 20 different blank and spiked matrices. Using device-independent color space for smartphone analysis, two different smartphone models were used for the analysis of optimized assays. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Spectroscopy-Based Biosensors)
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Open AccessArticle
The Application of a Nanomaterial Optical Fiber Biosensor Assay for Identification of Brucella Nomenspecies
Biosensors 2019, 9(2), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9020064 - 21 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Bacteria in the genus Brucella are the cause of brucellosis in humans and many domestic and wild animals. A rapid and culture-free detection assay to detect Brucella in clinical samples would be highly valuable. Nanomaterial optical fiber biosensors (NOFS) are capable of recognizing [...] Read more.
Bacteria in the genus Brucella are the cause of brucellosis in humans and many domestic and wild animals. A rapid and culture-free detection assay to detect Brucella in clinical samples would be highly valuable. Nanomaterial optical fiber biosensors (NOFS) are capable of recognizing DNA hybridization events or other analyte interactions with high specificity and sensitivity. Therefore, a NOFS assay was developed to detect Brucella DNA from cultures and in tissue samples from infected mice. An ionic self-assembled multilayer (ISAM) film was coupled to a long-period grating optical fiber, and a nucleotide probe complementary to the Brucella IS711 region and modified with biotin was bound to the ISAM by covalent conjugation. When the ISAM/probe duplex was exposed to lysate containing ≥100 killed cells of Brucella, or liver or spleen tissue extracts from Brucella-infected mice, substantial attenuation of light transmission occurred, whereas exposure of the complexed fiber to non-Brucella gram-negative bacteria or control tissue samples resulted in negligible attenuation of light transmission. Oligonucleotide probes specific for B. abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis could also be used to detect and differentiate these three nomenspecies. In summary, the NOFS biosensor assay detected three nomenspecies of Brucella without the use of polymerase chain reaction within 30 min and could specifically detect low numbers of this bacterium in clinical samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Spectroscopy-Based Biosensors)
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Open AccessArticle
Robust SERS Platforms Based on Annealed Gold Nanostructures Formed on Ultrafine Glass Substrates for Various (Bio)Applications
Biosensors 2019, 9(2), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9020053 - 10 Apr 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
In this study, stable gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are fabricated for the first time on commercial ultrafine glass coverslips coated with gold thin layers (2 nm, 4 nm, 6 nm, and 8 nm) at 25 °C and annealed at high temperatures (350 °C, 450 [...] Read more.
In this study, stable gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are fabricated for the first time on commercial ultrafine glass coverslips coated with gold thin layers (2 nm, 4 nm, 6 nm, and 8 nm) at 25 °C and annealed at high temperatures (350 °C, 450 °C, and 550 °C) on a hot plate for different periods of time. Such gold nanostructured coverslips were systematically tested via surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to identify their spectral performances in the presence of different concentrations of a model molecule, namely 1,2-bis-(4-pyridyl)-ethene (BPE). By using these SERS platforms, it is possible to detect BPE traces (10−12 M) in aqueous solutions in 120 s. The stability of SERS spectra over five weeks of thiol-DNA probe (2 µL) deposited on gold nano-structured coverslip is also reported. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Spectroscopy-Based Biosensors)
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Open AccessArticle
Ex Vivo Raman Spectrochemical Analysis Using a Handheld Probe Demonstrates High Predictive Capability of Brain Tumour Status
Biosensors 2019, 9(2), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9020049 - 30 Mar 2019
Cited by 5
Abstract
With brain tumour incidence increasing, there is an urgent need for better diagnostic tools. Intraoperatively, brain tumours are diagnosed using a smear preparation reported by a neuropathologist. These have many limitations, including the time taken for the specimen to reach the pathology department [...] Read more.
With brain tumour incidence increasing, there is an urgent need for better diagnostic tools. Intraoperatively, brain tumours are diagnosed using a smear preparation reported by a neuropathologist. These have many limitations, including the time taken for the specimen to reach the pathology department and for results to be communicated to the surgeon. There is also a need to assist with resection rates and identifying infiltrative tumour edges intraoperatively to improve clearance. We present a novel study using a handheld Raman probe in conjunction with gold nanoparticles, to detect primary and metastatic brain tumours from fresh brain tissue sent for intraoperative smear diagnosis. Fresh brain tissue samples sent for intraoperative smear diagnosis were tested using the handheld Raman probe after application of gold nanoparticles. Derived Raman spectra were inputted into forward feature extraction algorithms to build a predictive model for sensitivity and specificity of outcome. These results demonstrate an ability to detect primary from metastatic tumours (especially for normal and low grade lesions), in which accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were respectively equal to 98.6%, 94.4% and 99.5% for normal brain tissue; 96.1%, 92.2% and 97.0% for low grade glial tumours; 90.3%, 89.7% and 90.6% for high grade glial tumours; 94.8%, 63.9% and 97.1% for meningiomas; 95.4%, 79.2% and 98.8% for metastases; and 99.6%, 88.9% and 100% for lymphoma, based on smear samples (κ = 0.87). Similar results were observed when compared to the final formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissue diagnosis (κ = 0.85). Overall, our results have demonstrated the ability of Raman spectroscopy to match results provided by intraoperative smear diagnosis and raise the possibility of use intraoperatively to aid surgeons by providing faster diagnosis. Moving this technology into theatre will allow it to develop further and thus reach its potential in the clinical arena. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Spectroscopy-Based Biosensors)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Bio-Recognition in Spectroscopy-Based Biosensors for *Heavy Metals-Water and Waterborne Contamination Analysis
Biosensors 2019, 9(3), 96; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9030096 - 30 Jul 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Microsystems and biomolecules integration as well multiplexing determinations are key aspects of sensing devices in the field of heavy metal contamination monitoring. The present review collects the most relevant information about optical biosensors development in the last decade. Focus is put on analytical [...] Read more.
Microsystems and biomolecules integration as well multiplexing determinations are key aspects of sensing devices in the field of heavy metal contamination monitoring. The present review collects the most relevant information about optical biosensors development in the last decade. Focus is put on analytical characteristics and applications that are dependent on: (i) Signal transduction method (luminescence, colorimetry, evanescent wave (EW), surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), surface plasmon resonance (SPR); (ii) biorecognition molecules employed (proteins, nucleic acids, aptamers, and enzymes). The biosensing systems applied (or applicable) to water and milk samples will be considered for a comparative analysis, with an emphasis on water as the primary source of possible contamination along the food chain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Spectroscopy-Based Biosensors)
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Open AccessReview
Silver-Based Plasmonic Nanoparticles for and Their Use in Biosensing
Biosensors 2019, 9(2), 78; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9020078 - 10 Jun 2019
Cited by 17
Abstract
The localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) property of metallic nanoparticles is widely exploited for chemical and biological sensing. Selective biosensing of molecules using functionalized nanoparticles has become a major research interdisciplinary area between chemistry, biology and material science. Noble metals, especially gold (Au) [...] Read more.
The localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) property of metallic nanoparticles is widely exploited for chemical and biological sensing. Selective biosensing of molecules using functionalized nanoparticles has become a major research interdisciplinary area between chemistry, biology and material science. Noble metals, especially gold (Au) and silver (Ag) nanoparticles, exhibit unique and tunable plasmonic properties; the control over these metal nanostructures size and shape allows manipulating their LSPR and their response to the local environment. In this review, we will focus on Ag-based nanoparticles, a metal that has probably played the most important role in the development of the latest plasmonic applications, owing to its unique properties. We will first browse the methods for AgNPs synthesis allowing for controlled size, uniformity and shape. Ag-based biosensing is often performed with coated particles; therefore, in a second part, we will explore various coating strategies (organics, polymers, and inorganics) and their influence on coated-AgNPs properties. The third part will be devoted to the combination of gold and silver for plasmonic biosensing, in particular the use of mixed Ag and AuNPs, i.e., AgAu alloys or Ag-Au [email protected] nanoparticles will be outlined. In the last part, selected examples of Ag and AgAu-based plasmonic biosensors will be presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Spectroscopy-Based Biosensors)
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