Special Issue "Food Safety and Quality Monitoring"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 November 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Carmen L. Gomes

2012 Black Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA
Website | E-Mail
Guest Editor
Dr. Eric S. McLamore

Agricultural and Biological Engineering Department, University of Florida, 105 Frazier Rogers Hall, P.O. Box 110570, Gainesville, FL 32611-0570, USA
Website | E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The biosensors industry is now worth billions of US dollars, with applications mostly in the biomedical field. There is still a great demand for portable, user-friendly, rapid and highly robust methods to monitor food quality and safety throughout the food production chain. The use of biosensors as emerging technologies could revolutionize the study and detection of foodborne pathogens, toxins, allergens, contaminants, and biomarkers for food quality and safety. The development of biosensors will further serve the food industry, agricultural sector, regulatory community, and public health. A biosensor is defined as a device that recognizes biological or chemical species via interaction with a biological agent or biomaterial and then transduces this interaction into a measurable signal. This Special Issue aims to promote recent and significant advances in the field of biosensing and its applications to food safety, food quality, and food processing, as well as agriculture systems.

We would like to invite you to participate in this Special Issue by submitting either an original research paper or a review article on biosensors for food safety and quality monitoring.

Dr. Carmen L. Gomes
Dr. Eric S. McLamore
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Fluorescent Nanosensor Based on Molecularly Imprinted Polymers Coated on Graphene Quantum Dots for Fast Detection of Antibiotics
Biosensors 2018, 8(3), 82; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios8030082
Received: 13 July 2018 / Revised: 17 August 2018 / Accepted: 3 September 2018 / Published: 5 September 2018
PDF Full-text (3403 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this work, we developed a novel fluorescent sensor by combining molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with graphene quantum dots (GQDs) for the determination of tetracycline (TC) in aqueous samples. Firstly, we developed a one-pot green method to synthesize GQDs as the fluorescent probes.
[...] Read more.
In this work, we developed a novel fluorescent sensor by combining molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with graphene quantum dots (GQDs) for the determination of tetracycline (TC) in aqueous samples. Firstly, we developed a one-pot green method to synthesize GQDs as the fluorescent probes. GQDs with carboxyl groups or amino groups were fabricated. It was found that carboxyl groups played an important role in the fluorescence quenching. Based on these findings, the GQDs-MIPs microspheres were prepared using a sol-gel process. GQDs-MIPs showed strong fluorescent emission at 410 nm when excited at 360 nm, and the fluorescence was quenched in the presence of TC. Under optimum conditions, the fluorescence intensity of GQDs-MIPs decreased in response to the increase of TC concentration. The linear rage was from 1.0 to 104 µg·L−1, and the limit of detection was determined to be 1 µg·L−1. The GQDs-MIPs also demonstrated high selectivity towards TC. The fluorescent sensor was successfully applied for the detection of TC in real spiked milk samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Safety and Quality Monitoring)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Laser Scribed Graphene Biosensor for Detection of Biogenic Amines in Food Samples Using Locally Sourced Materials
Biosensors 2018, 8(2), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios8020042
Received: 6 February 2018 / Revised: 11 April 2018 / Accepted: 19 April 2018 / Published: 24 April 2018
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (4073 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In foods, high levels of biogenic amines (BA) are the result of microbial metabolism that could be affected by temperatures and storage conditions. Thus, the level of BA is commonly used as an indicator of food safety and quality. This manuscript outlines the
[...] Read more.
In foods, high levels of biogenic amines (BA) are the result of microbial metabolism that could be affected by temperatures and storage conditions. Thus, the level of BA is commonly used as an indicator of food safety and quality. This manuscript outlines the development of laser scribed graphene electrodes, with locally sourced materials, for reagent-free food safety biosensing. To fabricate the biosensors, the graphene surface was functionalized with copper microparticles and diamine oxidase, purchased from a local supermarket; and then compared to biosensors fabricated with analytical grade materials. The amperometric biosensor exhibits good electrochemical performance, with an average histamine sensitivity of 23.3 µA/mM, a lower detection limit of 11.6 µM, and a response time of 7.3 s, showing similar performance to biosensors constructed from analytical grade materials. We demonstrated the application of the biosensor by testing total BA concentration in fish paste samples subjected to fermentation with lactic acid bacteria. Biogenic amines concentrations prior to lactic acid fermentation were below the detection limit of the biosensor, while concentration after fermentation was 19.24 ± 8.21 mg histamine/kg, confirming that the sensor was selective in a complex food matrix. The low-cost, rapid, and accurate device is a promising tool for biogenic amine estimation in food samples, particularly in situations where standard laboratory techniques are unavailable, or are cost prohibitive. This biosensor can be used for screening food samples, potentially limiting food waste, while reducing chances of foodborne outbreaks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Safety and Quality Monitoring)
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top