Special Issue "Biosensors Applications for the Detection of Food Contaminants and Adulterants"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Valérie Gaudin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Anses Fougeres, 10B rue Claude Bourgelat - CS40608-35306 FOUGERES Cedex
Interests: food contaminants and adulterants; emerging bio-sensor techniques

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food chemical or microbiological (e.g., Listeria) contaminants are any substance not intentionally added to food, while food adulterants (e.g., melamine) are intentionally added. The origins of contamination are multiple: naturally occurring contaminants, environmental pollution (e.g., industrial activities), veterinary treatments, extensive agriculture (e.g., pesticides), packaging migration, food transformation, and disinfection. Contaminated and adulterated food can have harmful effects on human safety (e.g., allergies, toxicity, antimicrobial resistance, and the endocrine disruptor effect). The detection principles of conventional screening methods are microbiological, immunological (e.g., ELISA tests), instrumental physico-chemical, and PCR methods. Following the promising progress of biosensors for medical diagnostics (e.g., point of care (POC) testing), biosensors for food applications allow the development of sensitive, selective, quick, robust, and cheap screening methods to control food products: This Special Issue will present innovative applications of biosensors (e.g., optical, electrochemical, and mass sensitive) for the detection of contaminants and adulterants in foodstuffs of animal and plant origin. The first objective of this Special issue is to highlight the benefits of biosensors that could make them the screening tool for food contaminants of tomorrow. This Special Issue also aims to show the promising contribution of innovative biosensing elements (e.g., aptamers, molecular imprinting polymer (MIP), DNA), nanomaterials, and new technologies (e.g., micro/nanofluidics, Internet of Things (IoT)) to the development of more sensitive, portable, robust and cheaper biosensors. Review and research papers are welcome.

Dr. Valérie Gaudin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Detection
  • Screening
  • Contaminants
  • Adulterants
  • Food
  • Biosensor
  • Optical
  • Electrochemical
  • Mass sensitive
  • Nanomaterials
  • Aptamers
  • Molecular imprinting polymer (MIP)
  • DNA
  • Micro/Nanofluidics
  • Internet of Things (IoT)

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Detection of Salmonella Typhimurium in Romaine Lettuce Using a Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor
Biosensors 2019, 9(3), 94; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9030094 - 28 Jul 2019
Abstract
Leafy vegetables have been associated with high-profile outbreaks causing severe illnesses. Timely and accurate identification of potential contamination is essential to ensure food safety. A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay has been developed for the detection of Salmonella Typhimurium in leafy vegetables. The [...] Read more.
Leafy vegetables have been associated with high-profile outbreaks causing severe illnesses. Timely and accurate identification of potential contamination is essential to ensure food safety. A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay has been developed for the detection of Salmonella Typhimurium in leafy vegetables. The assay utilizes a pair of well characterized monoclonal antibodies specific to the flagellin of S. Typhimurium. Samples of romaine lettuce contaminated with S. Typhimurium at different levels (between 0.9 and 5.9 log cfu/g) were pre-enriched in buffered peptone water. Three SPR assay formats, direct assay, sequential two-step sandwich assay, and pre-incubation one-step sandwich assay were evaluated. All three assay formats detect well even at a low level of contamination (0.9 log cfu/g). The SPR assay showed a high specificity for the detection of S. Typhimurium in the presence of other commensal bacteria in the romaine lettuce samples. The results also suggested that further purification of flagellin from the sample preparation using immunomagnetic separation did not improve the detection sensitivity of the SPR assay. The functional protocol developed in this study can be readily used for the detection of S. Typhimurium in leafy vegetables with high sensitivity and specificity. Full article
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