Special Issue "Aptamer Sensors"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2016).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Giovanna Marrazza
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry “Ugo Schiff”, University of Florence, via della Lastruccia 3; 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, (Fi), Italy
Interests: immobilization procedure of biomolecules; protein–DNA complexes; aptamer; enzymatic sensors; thick-film technology; nanodispensing technologies; micro-flow systems; carbon nanotubes; nanoparticles; nanocomposite polymers; molecular imprinted polymers; protein-polymer conjugates
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will focus on recent developments in the field of aptamer sensors as these are becoming very powerful for a multitude of applications.

Aptamers are nucleic acid and peptide ligands, which can be selected for different targets starting from a huge library of molecules containing randomly created sequences. In the last years, great progress has been accomplished in the development of aptamer-based biosensors with different detection techniques. I would like to invite you to participate by submitting your original articles or reviews on your research with aptamer biosensors. Detection may include, but is not limited, to fluorescence, surface plasmon resonance, Raman, piezoelectric or electrochemical technique.

This Special Issue aims to provide a survey of the current topics and the major development lines in this rapidly growing research area.

Prof. Dr. Giovanna Marrazza
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • aptamer
  • affibody
  • DNA
  • RNA
  • nanomaterials
  • biosensor
  • affinity binding event
  • electrochemical
  • piezoelectric
  • SPR
  • fluorescence
  • electrochemiluminescence
  • colorimetry
  • surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy
  • acoustic wave

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Aptamer Sensors
Biosensors 2017, 7(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios7010005 - 04 Jan 2017
Cited by 5
Abstract
In the last years, great progress has been accomplished in the development of aptamer sensors with different transducers. In order to improve the sensitivity of these biosensors, several methodologies have been employed. In this Special Issue, the state of art and the future [...] Read more.
In the last years, great progress has been accomplished in the development of aptamer sensors with different transducers. In order to improve the sensitivity of these biosensors, several methodologies have been employed. In this Special Issue, the state of art and the future trends in the field of aptamer sensors have been explored. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aptamer Sensors)

Review

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Open AccessReview
Monitoring Intact Viruses Using Aptamers
Biosensors 2016, 6(3), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios6030040 - 04 Aug 2016
Cited by 13
Abstract
Viral diagnosis and surveillance are necessary steps in containing the spread of viral diseases, and they help in the deployment of appropriate therapeutic interventions. In the past, the commonly employed viral detection methods were either cell-culture or molecule-level assays. Most of these assays [...] Read more.
Viral diagnosis and surveillance are necessary steps in containing the spread of viral diseases, and they help in the deployment of appropriate therapeutic interventions. In the past, the commonly employed viral detection methods were either cell-culture or molecule-level assays. Most of these assays are laborious and expensive, require special facilities, and provide a slow diagnosis. To circumvent these limitations, biosensor-based approaches are becoming attractive, especially after the successful commercialization of glucose and other biosensors. In the present article, I have reviewed the current progress using the biosensor approach for detecting intact viruses. At the time of writing this review, three types of bioreceptor surfaces (antibody-, glycan-, and aptamer-based) have been explored on different sensing platforms for detecting intact viruses. Among these bioreceptors, aptamer-based sensors have been increasingly explored for detecting intact viruses using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and other platforms. Special emphasis is placed on the aptamer-based SPR platform in the present review. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aptamer Sensors)
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Open AccessReview
Electrochemical, Electrochemiluminescence, and Photoelectrochemical Aptamer-Based Nanostructured Sensors for Biomarker Analysis
Biosensors 2016, 6(3), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios6030039 - 02 Aug 2016
Cited by 18
Abstract
Aptamer-based sensors have been intensively investigated as potential analytical tools in clinical analysis providing the desired portability, fast response, sensitivity, and specificity, in addition to lower cost and simplicity versus conventional methods. The aim of this review, without pretending to be exhaustive, is [...] Read more.
Aptamer-based sensors have been intensively investigated as potential analytical tools in clinical analysis providing the desired portability, fast response, sensitivity, and specificity, in addition to lower cost and simplicity versus conventional methods. The aim of this review, without pretending to be exhaustive, is to give the readers an overview of recent important achievements about electrochemical, electrochemiluminescence, and photoelectrochemical aptasensors for the protein biomarker determination, mainly cancer related biomarkers, by selected recent publications. Special emphasis is placed on nanostructured-based aptasensors, which show a substantial improvement of the analytical performances. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aptamer Sensors)
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Open AccessReview
MIPs and Aptamers for Recognition of Proteins in Biomimetic Sensing
Biosensors 2016, 6(3), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios6030035 - 18 Jul 2016
Cited by 19
Abstract
Biomimetic binders and catalysts have been generated in order to substitute the biological pendants in separation techniques and bioanalysis. The two major approaches use either “evolution in the test tube” of nucleotides for the preparation of aptamers or total chemical synthesis for molecularly [...] Read more.
Biomimetic binders and catalysts have been generated in order to substitute the biological pendants in separation techniques and bioanalysis. The two major approaches use either “evolution in the test tube” of nucleotides for the preparation of aptamers or total chemical synthesis for molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). The reproducible production of aptamers is a clear advantage, whilst the preparation of MIPs typically leads to a population of polymers with different binding sites. The realization of binding sites in the total bulk of the MIPs results in a higher binding capacity, however, on the expense of the accessibility and exchange rate. Furthermore, the readout of the bound analyte is easier for aptamers since the integration of signal generating labels is well established. On the other hand, the overall negative charge of the nucleotides makes aptamers prone to non-specific adsorption of positively charged constituents of the sample and the “biological” degradation of non-modified aptamers and ionic strength-dependent changes of conformation may be challenging in some application. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aptamer Sensors)
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Open AccessReview
Aptasensors Based on Whispering Gallery Mode Resonators
Biosensors 2016, 6(3), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios6030028 - 16 Jul 2016
Cited by 3
Abstract
In this paper, we review the literature on optical evanescent field sensing in resonant cavities where aptamers are used as biochemical receptors. The combined advantages of highly sensitive whispering gallery mode resonator (WGMR)-based transducers, and of the unique properties of aptamers make this [...] Read more.
In this paper, we review the literature on optical evanescent field sensing in resonant cavities where aptamers are used as biochemical receptors. The combined advantages of highly sensitive whispering gallery mode resonator (WGMR)-based transducers, and of the unique properties of aptamers make this approach extremely interesting in the medical field, where there is a particularly high need for devices able to provide real time diagnosis for cancer, infectious diseases, or strokes. However, despite the superior performances of aptamers compared to antibodies and WGMR to other evanescent sensors, there is not much literature combining both types of receptors and transducers. Up to now, the WGMR that have been used are silica microspheres and silicon oxynitride (SiON) ring resonators. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aptamer Sensors)
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Open AccessReview
Harnessing Aptamers to Overcome Challenges in Gluten Detection
Biosensors 2016, 6(2), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios6020016 - 20 Apr 2016
Cited by 11
Abstract
Celiac disease is a lifelong autoimmune disorder triggered by foods containing gluten, the storage protein in wheat, rye, and barley. The rapidly escalating number of patients diagnosed with this disease poses a great challenge to both food industry and authorities to guarantee food [...] Read more.
Celiac disease is a lifelong autoimmune disorder triggered by foods containing gluten, the storage protein in wheat, rye, and barley. The rapidly escalating number of patients diagnosed with this disease poses a great challenge to both food industry and authorities to guarantee food safety for all. Therefore, intensive efforts are being made to establish minimal disease-eliciting doses of gluten and consequently to improve gluten-free labeling. These efforts depend to a high degree on the availability of methods capable of detecting the protein in food samples at levels as low as possible. Current analytical approaches rely on the use of antibodies as selective recognition elements. With limited sensitivity, these methods exhibit some deficiencies that compromise the accuracy of the obtained results. Aptamers provide an ideal alternative for designing biosensors for fast and selective measurement of gluten in foods. This article highlights the challenges in gluten detection, the current status of the use of aptamers for solving this problem, and what remains to be done to move these systems into commercial applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aptamer Sensors)
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Submitted Abstracts

Title: Harnessing Aptamers to Overcome Challenges in Gluten Detection
Authors: Rebeca Miranda Castro, Noemí de-los-Santos-Álvarez, Arturo J. Miranda-Ordieres, Maria Jesús Lobo-Castañón*
Affiliation: Departamento de Química-Física y Analítica. Universidad de Oviedo, Julián Clavería, 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); E-mail: [email protected]
Abstract: Celiac disease is a lifelong autoimmune disorder triggered by foods containing gluten, the storage protein in wheat, rye and barley. The rapidly escalating number of patients diagnosed with this disease poses a great challenge to both the food industry and regulators to guarantee food safety for all. Therefore, intensive efforts are being made to establish minimal disease-eliciting doses of gluten and, consequently, to improve gluten-free labelling. These efforts depend to a high degree on the availability of methods capable of detecting the protein in food samples at as low a level as possible. Current analytical approaches rely on the use of antibodies as selective recognition elements. With limited sensitivity, these methods exhibit some deficiencies that compromise the accuracy of the obtained results. Aptamers provide an ideal alternative for designing biosensors for fast and selective measurement of gluten in foods. This article highlights the challenges in gluten detection, current status of the use of aptamers for solving this problem, and what remains to be done to apply these systems in commercial applications.
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