Special Issue "SERS-Based Sensors: Design and Biomedical Applications"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 May 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Hicham Fenniri
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Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, 313 Snell Engineering Center, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA
Interests: nanomaterials science and engineering, supramolecular chemistry, theranostics, targeted drug delivery, sensors
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Sidi A. Bencherif
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Guest Editor
Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA
Interests: Biomaterials, Cryogels, Drug Delivery, Tissue Engineering, Cancer Immunotherapy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) spectroscopy is a powerful and well-established analytical method for sensing and ultra-detection (down to a single molecule). Several novel strategies for the design, fabrication, and implementation of SERS-based sensors for applications in life sciences and medicine have emerged in recent years. This Special Issue of Biosensors will focus on: (a) specific nanoscale design and fabrication criteria for SERS-based sensors, (b) the effects of shape, size, periodicity, and chemical composition on signal enhancement, (c) chemical/physical modification to impart sensor specificity/selectivity, (d) biocompatibility, (e) in-vitro and in-vivo sensing in life sciences and medicine, and (f) theranostics (diagnostic imaging and targeted therapy) using SERS-active nanomaterials.

We encourage original contributions or reviews of recent literature in any of these areas.

Prof. Dr. Hicham Fenniri
Assist. Prof. Dr. Sidi M. Bencherif
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Open AccessReview
In Vitro and In Vivo SERS Biosensing for Disease Diagnosis
Biosensors 2018, 8(2), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios8020046 - 11 May 2018
Cited by 26
Abstract
For many disease states, positive outcomes are directly linked to early diagnosis, where therapeutic intervention would be most effective. Recently, trends in disease diagnosis have focused on the development of label-free sensing techniques that are sensitive to low analyte concentrations found in the [...] Read more.
For many disease states, positive outcomes are directly linked to early diagnosis, where therapeutic intervention would be most effective. Recently, trends in disease diagnosis have focused on the development of label-free sensing techniques that are sensitive to low analyte concentrations found in the physiological environment. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a powerful vibrational spectroscopy that allows for label-free, highly sensitive, and selective detection of analytes through the amplification of localized electric fields on the surface of a plasmonic material when excited with monochromatic light. This results in enhancement of the Raman scattering signal, which allows for the detection of low concentration analytes, giving rise to the use of SERS as a diagnostic tool for disease. Here, we present a review of recent developments in the field of in vivo and in vitro SERS biosensing for a range of disease states including neurological disease, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and viral disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue SERS-Based Sensors: Design and Biomedical Applications)
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Review on SERS of Bacteria
Biosensors 2017, 7(4), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios7040051 - 13 Nov 2017
Cited by 22
Abstract
Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been widely used for chemical detection. Moreover, the inherent richness of the spectral data has made SERS attractive for use in detecting biological materials, including bacteria. This review discusses methods that have been used to obtain SERS [...] Read more.
Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been widely used for chemical detection. Moreover, the inherent richness of the spectral data has made SERS attractive for use in detecting biological materials, including bacteria. This review discusses methods that have been used to obtain SERS spectra of bacteria. The kinds of SERS substrates employed to obtain SERS spectra are discussed as well as how bacteria interact with silver and gold nanoparticles. The roll of capping agents on Ag/Au NPs in obtaining SERS spectra is examined as well as the interpretation of the spectral data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue SERS-Based Sensors: Design and Biomedical Applications)
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