Biosensors and Diagnostic Platforms in Support of Global Health, Antimicrobial Stewardship, Food Sustainability, and Water-Environment Quality 2023

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Biosensors and Biosensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2023) | Viewed by 6267

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Nano-Biosensors Lab, Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Michigan State University, Farrall Agricultural Engineering Hall, 524 S. Shaw Lane, Room 115, East Lansing, MI 48824-1323, USA
Interests: nanoparticle-based biosensors; PCR-less genomic detection; genome-phenome approaches to antimicrobial resistance (AMR) detection; beta-lactam (carbapenem) resistance
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleague,

This Special Issue of Biosensors invites papers on novel approaches in biosensors and biosensing platforms that address unmet needs in the rapid detection and diagnosis of diseases and biomarkers, particularly those with global societal impacts on human health, animal health, animal production, plant protection, water quality, environmental sustainability, food safety, biosecurity, and antimicrobial stewardship. The COVID-19 pandemic has also highlighted the need for the rapid detection of biomarkers and indicators in asymptomatic cases. A major focus of this Issue is addressing the accessibility of these biosensing technologies in terms of affordability, simplicity, and resource-limited operability and how they could be incorporated in the arsenal of prevention strategies against future pandemics. Papers and abstracts presented at the “2023 GARD Forum: Bridging Technologies and Market Needs” are welcome to this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Evangelyn C. Alocilja
Guest Editor

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Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 1865 KiB  
Article
APHRODITE: A Compact Lab-on-Chip Biosensor for the Real-Time Analysis of Salivary Biomarkers in Space Missions
by Lorenzo Nardi, Nithin Maipan Davis, Serena Sansolini, Thiago Baratto de Albuquerque, Mohcine Laarraj, Domenico Caputo, Giampiero de Cesare, Seyedeh Rojin Shariati Pour, Martina Zangheri, Donato Calabria, Massimo Guardigli, Michele Balsamo, Elisa Carrubba, Fabrizio Carubia, Marco Ceccarelli, Michele Ghiozzi, Liyana Popova, Andrea Tenaglia, Marino Crisconio, Alessandro Donati, Augusto Nascetti and Mara Mirasoliadd Show full author list remove Hide full author list
Biosensors 2024, 14(2), 72; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios14020072 - 30 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1391
Abstract
One of the main challenges to be faced in deep space missions is to protect the health and ensure the maximum efficiency of the crew by preparing methods of prevention and in situ diagnosis. Indeed, the hostile environment causes important health problems, ranging [...] Read more.
One of the main challenges to be faced in deep space missions is to protect the health and ensure the maximum efficiency of the crew by preparing methods of prevention and in situ diagnosis. Indeed, the hostile environment causes important health problems, ranging from muscle atrophy, osteopenia, and immunological and metabolic alterations due to microgravity, to an increased risk of cancer caused by exposure to radiation. It is, therefore, necessary to provide new methods for the real-time measurement of biomarkers suitable for deepening our knowledge of the effects of space flight on the balance of the immune system and for allowing the monitoring of the astronaut’s health during long-term missions. APHRODITE will enable human space exploration because it fills this void that affects both missions in LEO and future missions to the Moon and Mars. Its scientific objectives are the design, production, testing, and in-orbit demonstration of a compact, reusable, and reconfigurable system for performing the real-time analysis of oral fluid samples in manned space missions. In the frame of this project, a crew member onboard the ISS will employ APHRODITE to measure the selected target analytes, cortisol, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), in oral fluid, in four (plus one additional desired session) separate experiment sessions. The paper addresses the design of the main subsystems of the analytical device and the preliminary results obtained during the first implementations of the device subsystems and testing measurements on Earth. In particular, the system design and the experiment data output of the lab-on-chip photosensors and of the front-end readout electronics are reported in detail along with preliminary chemical tests for the duplex competitive CL-immunoassay for the simultaneous detection of cortisol and DHEA-S. Different applications also on Earth are envisaged for the APHRODITE device, as it will be suitable for point-of-care testing applications (e.g., emergency medicine, bioterrorism, diagnostics in developing countries, etc.). Full article
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11 pages, 2528 KiB  
Communication
Discovery of Novel Stimulators of Pax7 and/or MyoD: Enhancing the Efficacy of Cultured Meat Production through Culture Media Enrichment
by In-Sun Yu, Yae Rim Choi, Jungseok Choi, Mina K. Kim, Chang Hwa Jung, Min Young Um and Min Jung Kim
Biosensors 2024, 14(1), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios14010024 - 30 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1325
Abstract
The principles of myogenesis play crucial roles in the production of cultured meat, and identifying protein stimulators associated with myogenesis holds great potential to enhance the efficiency of this process. In this study, we used surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based screening of a natural [...] Read more.
The principles of myogenesis play crucial roles in the production of cultured meat, and identifying protein stimulators associated with myogenesis holds great potential to enhance the efficiency of this process. In this study, we used surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based screening of a natural product library to discover ligands for Pax7 and MyoD, key regulators of satellite cells (SCs), and performed cell-based assays on Hanwoo SCs (HWSCs) to identify substances that promote cell proliferation and/or differentiation. Through an SPR analysis, we found that six chemicals, including one Pax7+/MyoD− chemical, four Pax7+/MyoD+ chemicals, and one Pax7−/MyoD+ chemical, bound to Pax7 and/or MyoD proteins. Among four Pax7+/MyoD+ chemicals, parthenolide (0.5 and 1 µM) and rutin (100 and 200 µM) stimulated cell proliferation in the medium with 10% FBS similar to the medium with 20% FBS, without affecting differentiation. Adenosine, a Pax7−/MyoD+ chemical, accelerated differentiation. These chemicals could be potential additives to reduce the reliance of FBS required for HWSC proliferation and differentiation in cultured meat production. Full article
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15 pages, 3260 KiB  
Article
Optimized Copper-Based Microfeathers for Glucose Detection
by Carlota Guati, Lucía Gómez-Coma, Marcos Fallanza and Inmaculada Ortiz
Biosensors 2023, 13(12), 1032; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios13121032 - 15 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1253
Abstract
Diabetes is expected to rise substantially by 2045, prompting extensive research into accessible glucose electrochemical sensors, especially those based on non-enzymatic materials. In this context, advancing the knowledge of stable metal-based compounds as alternatives to non-enzymatic sensors becomes a scientific challenge. Nonetheless, these [...] Read more.
Diabetes is expected to rise substantially by 2045, prompting extensive research into accessible glucose electrochemical sensors, especially those based on non-enzymatic materials. In this context, advancing the knowledge of stable metal-based compounds as alternatives to non-enzymatic sensors becomes a scientific challenge. Nonetheless, these materials have encountered difficulties in maintaining stable responses under physiological conditions. This work aims to advance knowledge related to the synthesis and characterization of copper-based electrodes for glucose detection. The microelectrode presented here exhibits a wide linear range and a sensitivity of 1009 µA∙cm−2∙mM−1, overperfoming the results reported in literature so far. This electrode material has also demonstrated outstanding results in terms of reproducibility, repeatability, and stability, thereby meeting ISO 15197:2015 standards. Our study guides future research on next-generation sensors that combine copper with other materials to enhance activity in neutral media. Full article
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14 pages, 2897 KiB  
Article
Multi-Probe Nano-Genomic Biosensor to Detect S. aureus from Magnetically-Extracted Food Samples
by Chelsie Boodoo, Emma Dester, Jeswin David, Vedi Patel, Rabin KC and Evangelyn C. Alocilja
Biosensors 2023, 13(6), 608; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios13060608 - 02 Jun 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1678
Abstract
One of the most prevalent causes of foodborne illnesses worldwide is staphylococcal food poisoning. This study aimed to provide a robust method to extract the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus from food samples using glycan-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Then, a cost-effective multi-probe genomic biosensor was [...] Read more.
One of the most prevalent causes of foodborne illnesses worldwide is staphylococcal food poisoning. This study aimed to provide a robust method to extract the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus from food samples using glycan-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Then, a cost-effective multi-probe genomic biosensor was designed to detect the nuc gene of S. aureus rapidly in different food matrices. This biosensor utilized gold nanoparticles and two DNA oligonucleotide probes combined to produce a plasmonic/colorimetric response to inform users if the sample was positive for S. aureus. In addition, the specificity and sensitivity of the biosensor were determined. For the specificity trials, the S. aureus biosensor was compared with the extracted DNA of Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE), and Bacillus cereus. The sensitivity tests showed that the biosensor could detect as low as 2.5 ng/µL of the target DNA with a linear range of up to 20 ng/µL of DNA. With further research, this simple and cost-effective biosensor can rapidly identify foodborne pathogens from large-volume samples. Full article
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