Involvement of Pro-inflammatory Mediators in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases and Related Psychiatric Disorders

A special issue of Biomedicines (ISSN 2227-9059). This special issue belongs to the section "Immunology and Immunotherapy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2023) | Viewed by 5085

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Head of Allergology and Clinical Immunology Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genoa and San Bartolomeo Hospital, Sarzana, Italy
Interests: immunodeficiency; autoimmunity; neuro-endocrino-immunology; pharmacogenomics; soluble molecules; immune-mediated diseases; allergies; vaccines
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Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, School and Operative Unit of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, University of Messina, 98125 Messina, Italy
Interests: inflammatory mediators; the citokine network (interleukins, chemokines, adhesion molecules, lipoxines); the oxidative stress in various areas of clinical immunology; allergy; oncology
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Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, AOU University Policlinic “Gaetano Martino”, University of Messina, Messina, Italy
Interests: clinical psychology; psychopathology; quality of life; psycho-immunology; depressive and anxiety symptoms and disorders and chronic illnesses
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent decades, there has been a progressive lengthening of life expectancy, with a consequent increase in susceptibility to chronic morbidity. This increased susceptibility appears to stem from the tendency of older organisms to develop a generalized pro-inflammatory state, characterized by elevated levels of pro-inflammatory markers in cells and tissues, a condition often called "inflammaging".

This pro-inflammatory condition is a direct consequence of cellular senescence processes, characterized by the transition from a naive phenotype to that of memory T cells and type 1 to a profile of type 2 cytokines, with consequent secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-6 and IL-8 implicated in age-related chronic diseases, including atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, dementia, major depression, osteoporosis and sarcopenia.

The pro-inflammatory cytokines released in chronic inflammatory diseases also appear to be involved in the development of biological mechanisms capable of influencing individual behavior, including the development of psychiatric disorders capable of significantly influencing the patient's quality of life and therefore the management of the disease.

Given these premises, this Special Issue aims to relate the psycho-social impact of chronic inflammatory diseases with their clinical severity and their impact on QoL in order to identify their main prognostic factors.

Dr. Giuseppe Murdaca
Dr. Sebastiano Gangemi
Dr. Gabriella Martino
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • chronic inflammatory diseases
  • pro-inflammatory cytokines
  • inflammaging
  • major depression

Published Papers (2 papers)

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11 pages, 456 KiB  
Review
Neuro-Inflammaging and Psychopathological Distress
by Giuseppe Murdaca, Francesca Paladin, Marco Casciaro, Carmelo Mario Vicario, Sebastiano Gangemi and Gabriella Martino
Biomedicines 2022, 10(9), 2133; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines10092133 - 31 Aug 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2487
Abstract
Inflammaging is a low degree of chronic and systemic tissue inflammation associated with aging, and is intimately linked to pro-inflammatory mediators. These substances are involved in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases and related psychopathological symptoms. When inflammation and aging affect the brain, [...] Read more.
Inflammaging is a low degree of chronic and systemic tissue inflammation associated with aging, and is intimately linked to pro-inflammatory mediators. These substances are involved in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases and related psychopathological symptoms. When inflammation and aging affect the brain, we use the term neuro-inflammaging. In this review, we focused on the neuro-inflammatory process typical of advanced ages and the related psychopathological symptoms, with particular attention to understanding the immune-pathogenetic mechanisms involved and the potential use of immunomodulatory drugs in the control of clinical psychological signs. Inflammation and CNS were demonstrated being intimately linked in the neuro-inflammatory loop. IL-1, IL-6, TNF-a, COX and PGE are only partially responsible. BBB permeability and the consequent oxidative stress resulting from tissue damage make the rest. Some authors elaborated the “theory of cytokine-induced depression”. Inflammation has a crucial role in the onset symptoms of psychopathological diseases as it is capable of altering the metabolism of biogenic monoamines involved in their pathogenesis. In recent years, NSAIDs as an adjunct therapy in the treatment of relevant psychopathological disorders associated with chronic inflammatory conditions demonstrated their efficacy. Additionally, novel molecules have been studied, such as adalimumab, infliximab, and etanercept showing antidepressant and anxiolytic promising results. However, we are only at the beginning of a new era characterized by the use of biological drugs for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, and this paper aims to stimulate future studies in such a direction. Full article
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20 pages, 418 KiB  
Systematic Review
Implications for Self-Management among African Caribbean Adults with Noncommunicable Diseases and Mental Health Disorders: A Systematic Review
by Cherlie Magny-Normilus, Saria Hassan, Julie Sanders, Catrina Longhurst, Christopher S. Lee and Corrine Y. Jurgens
Biomedicines 2022, 10(11), 2735; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines10112735 - 28 Oct 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2163
Abstract
Mental health problems are common among individuals suffering from chronic noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Self-management is essential in preventing NCD progression. Mental health problems can impede the ability to self-manage one’s NCDs. The African Caribbean population [...] Read more.
Mental health problems are common among individuals suffering from chronic noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Self-management is essential in preventing NCD progression. Mental health problems can impede the ability to self-manage one’s NCDs. The African Caribbean population in the United States suffers from a high burden of NCDs and has unique societal factors that alter disease management. This systematic review aimed to better understand the burden of mental health problems among African Caribbean adults with one or more NCDs and explore the association between mental health disorders and the level of control of NCDs. A literature search was conducted for original research documenting the prevalence of mental illnesses in individuals with NCDs. Data were descriptively summarized. Fourteen studies met inclusion criteria. Three themes emerged: (1) prevalence of comorbid mental health problems and chronic NCDs; (2) factors that mitigate or mediate the association between mental health problems and chronic NCDs—(a) factors influencing self-management; (b) association between mental health and NCD outcome studies focused on (b1) risk factors and (b2) protective factors; and (3) varied results. Chronic disease self-management and disease outcomes are influenced by mental problems and the association is mitigated by complex factors in the African Caribbean population. Full article
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