Special Issue "Immune Response Regulation in Animals"

A special issue of Biology (ISSN 2079-7737). This special issue belongs to the section "Immunology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2023 | Viewed by 2179

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Rong Gao
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610017, China
Interests: immunoregulation of animals; adjuvant for vaccine; immune memory; cytokine; biotechnology; molecular genetics
Prof. Dr. Hua-Ji Qiu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Harbin Veterinary Research Institute (HVRI), Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS), Harbin 150069, China
Interests: classical swine fever; African swine fever; pseudorabies; vaccines; innate and adaptive immunity; virus-host interactions; pathogenesis; diagnostic assays
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

(1) outline the overall a. focus, b. scope and c. purpose of the special issue

Immune response regulation is  increasingly important, not only for vaccinating animals but also for infectious diseases which do not currently have a vaccine. Newly emerging pathogens and immunosuppression complications continue to threaten the health of human beings and animals around the world. Therefore, there is an urgent need to explore and develop safer and more effective immunomodulators, enhancing animals’ immunity and resistance to diseases.

Besides adjuvants,  immunomodulator innovation is also popular for some infectious diseases that can not be prevented via vaccine. Generally, immunomodulator could enhance the magnitude, breadth, and durability of animals’ immune response to different antigens or pathogens. Recent basic advances indicate that tissue damage, different forms of cell death, and metabolic and nutrient sensors could be employed to modulate the innate immune system to activate adaptive immunity. Moreover, novel conceptual discoveries in systems biology highlight the molecular networks driving immune response to vaccines, providing mechanistic insights and guidance to speed up the immunomodulator discovery and development process. This will satisfy the urgent need to control new emerging infectious diseases, such as COVID-19 and tuberculosis.

(2) suggest how the issue will usefully supplement (relate to) existing literature

The goal of this Research Topic on immune-response regulation is to provide a forum to promote the academic exchange of research on the regulation of activation of innate immunity, adaptive immune response process, immune memory, and immunoprotection of animals and humans to vaccination or infection by different molecules. It focuses on revealing how to explore the novel immunomodulators, discussing their potential effects on vaccinations and infections, and highlighting how to develop safer and more competent immunomodulators to control infectious diseases in a better, more cost-effective way.  Based on the latest immunology advances and system vaccinology, we welcome manuscripts related to the following subtopics:

  1. Stimulation of immune cells by new molecules from the Danger model and their derivatives, including agonists of PRRs, damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), and cell death via necroptosis or pyroptosis, as well as other stress signals such as amino acid starvation (via ancient stress and nutrient-sensing pathways).
  2. The possible synergic effects among these stimuli on Toll-like receptors (TLRs), innate PRRs (such as retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I), and other RNA sensors), DNA sensors (such as stimulator of interferon genes (STING) protein), C-type lectins, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs) and cytosolic receptors such as NLRP3.
  3. Approaches of targeting DCs/APCs to promote uptake of antigens, activation of adaptive competent immune cells via different routes or molecules, such as FcR and mannose receptors, etc.
  4. Use of the molecular networks and insights from systems vaccinology acquire more accurate and comprehensive regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses to result in stronger immunity and longer protection duration, such as cytokines, designing novel metabolites, small molecules immune potentiators (SMIPs) and synthetic ligands allowing targeting subsets of adaptive competent immune cells and precision modulation and orchestrating continuous education to B and T cells, which lead to better proliferation, differentiation, and maturation of immune memory and effectors to induce sustained protective immunity.

In summation, we hope that more immunomodulators will be discovered and invented to regulate the immunity of animals, facilitating the prevention and control of various diseases in the future and helping people to eliminate pathogenic challenges.

Prof. Dr. Rong Gao
Prof. Dr. Hua-Ji Qiu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biology is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • immunoregulation of animals
  • vaccination
  • immunomodulators
  • immune memory
  • cytokine
  • biotechnology
  • immune response
  • molecular networks

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Porcine Interleukin-17 and 22 Co-Expressed by Yarrowia lipolytica Enhance Immunity and Increase Protection against Bacterial Challenge in Mice and Piglets
Biology 2022, 11(12), 1747; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology11121747 - 30 Nov 2022
Viewed by 536
Abstract
Drug resistance in economic animals to pathogens is a matter of widespread concern due to abuse of antibiotics. In order to develop a safe and economical immunopotentiator to raise the immunity and antibacterial response as a replacement for antibiotics, a recombinant yeast co-expressing [...] Read more.
Drug resistance in economic animals to pathogens is a matter of widespread concern due to abuse of antibiotics. In order to develop a safe and economical immunopotentiator to raise the immunity and antibacterial response as a replacement for antibiotics, a recombinant yeast co-expressing pig interleukin-17 (IL-17) and IL-22 was constructed and designated as Po1h-pINA1297-IL-17/22. To evaluate the immunoregulator activities of Po1h-pINA1297-IL-17/22, two experiment groups (oral inoculation with Po1h-pINA1297 or Po1h-pINA1297-IL-17/22) and a negative control group (PBS) were set up using 4-week-old female BALB/c mice (10/group). The level of cytokines, including IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, and IFN-γ, were detected by ELISA, and the circulating CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes were quantified by flow cytometry. The IgG and secretory IgA (SIgA) levels in both small intestine and fecal matter were also measured by ELISA. The results indicated that the IgG antibody titer and SIgA concentration increased significantly in the Po1h-pINA1297-IL17/22 group in comparison with the controls (p < 0.05) and so did the cytokine levels in the serum (IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, and IFN-γ). In addition, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were also obviously elevated in the Po1h-pINA1297-IL17/22 group on 35th day (p < 0.05). After challenge with pathogenic Salmonella typhimurium, the Po1h-pINA1297-IL17/22 group showed a relatively higher survival rate without obvious infectious symptoms. On the contrary, the mortality of control group reached 80% due to bacterial infection. As for the piglet experiment, 30 healthy 7-day piglets were similarly attributed into three groups. The oral inoculation of piglets with Po1h-pINA1297-IL17/22 also markedly improved the growth performance and systemic immunity (up-regulations of IL-4, IL-6, IL-15, IL-17, IL-22, and IL-23). Overall, the results indicated that Po1h-pINA1297-IL17/22 effectively promoted the humoral and cellular immunity against bacterial infection. These proved the promising potential of Po1h-pINA1297-IL-17/22 to be a potent immunopotentiator for the prevention of microbial pathogen infections. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Immune Response Regulation in Animals)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Co-Expression of Pig IL-2 and Fusion Bovine Cathelicidin Gene by Recombinant Plasmids in Yeast and Their Promotion of Mouse Antibacterial Defense
Biology 2022, 11(10), 1491; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology11101491 - 12 Oct 2022
Viewed by 639
Abstract
In order to develop an effective and safe immunomodulator to enhance the antimicrobial bioactivity and immunity of animals against infectious bacterial diseases, a recombinant plasmid pGAPZαA-IL2-B co-expressing pig interleukin-2 (PIL-2) and fused bovine cathelicidin (FBC) genes were constructed using the 2A self-cleavage technique. [...] Read more.
In order to develop an effective and safe immunomodulator to enhance the antimicrobial bioactivity and immunity of animals against infectious bacterial diseases, a recombinant plasmid pGAPZαA-IL2-B co-expressing pig interleukin-2 (PIL-2) and fused bovine cathelicidin (FBC) genes were constructed using the 2A self-cleavage technique. After being expressed in Pichia pastoris strain SMD1168, the recombinant yeast was administered orally to 5-week-old female ICR mice. The control mice were similarly dosed with P. pastoris with a blank plasmid or FBC recombinant plasmid alone. At 28 days post-treatment, the mice were challenged intraperitoneally with virulent strains of either E. coli or S. aureus. Compared with the control groups, the mice that received recombinant yeast co-expressing PIL-2/FBC manifested significant increases in the number of leukocytes, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, IgG, and the gene expressions of TLRs(TLR1,4,6,9), antimicrobial peptides(CRP4 and CRAMP) and cytokines (IL-2, 4, 6, 7, 12, 15, 23, IFN-γ, and TNF-α) in the blood. Furthermore, the treated mice displayed significantly higher survival than the other two control groups after the challenge. These results suggest that the antimicrobial activity and immunity of animals can be effectively enhanced by the in vivo co-expression of IL-2 and the FBS gene, which can facilitate the development of new immunopotentiation molecules to overcome the infection of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Immune Response Regulation in Animals)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Characterization of Porcine Monocyte-Derived Macrophages Cultured in Serum-Reduced Medium
Biology 2022, 11(10), 1457; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology11101457 - 04 Oct 2022
Viewed by 570
Abstract
The aim of this study was to establish a cell culture system for the generation of porcine monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) under reduced-serum conditions. Cultures based on either the Nu-Serum™ Growth Medium Supplement (NUS) or a conventional fetal bovine serum (FBS) were compared, which [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to establish a cell culture system for the generation of porcine monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) under reduced-serum conditions. Cultures based on either the Nu-Serum™ Growth Medium Supplement (NUS) or a conventional fetal bovine serum (FBS) were compared, which included the assessment of FBS from two different providers (FBS1 and FBS2). The data obtained confirmed the significant impact of culture conditions on in vitro-generated MDMs. The MDMs cultured under reduced-serum conditions showed increased levels of IL-1β and CD86 mRNA and a proinflammatory cytokine profile, characterized by the increased mRNA expression of IL-23p19, CXCL10, and CCL5. Phagocytic and respiratory burst activities were not adversely affected. Surprisingly, the difference between the two FBSs was much more pronounced than the effect of the reduced-serum supplement. The FBS1 culture conditions gave rise to macrophages with higher surface levels of CD14, CD16, and CD163, a lower CD80 mRNA expression, and an increased induction of IL-10 gene expression. In contrast, none of these trends were observed in macrophage cultures supplemented with FBS2. Instead, the FBS2 culture showed increased levels of IL-1b and CD86 mRNA. In conclusion, reduced-serum culture is a useful tool for in vitro porcine MDM generation, in line with the current research trend of reducing FBS use in biological research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Immune Response Regulation in Animals)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop