Special Issue "Diversity of Soil Fungal Communities"

A special issue of Biology (ISSN 2079-7737). This special issue belongs to the section "Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Fabiana Canini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Ecological and Biological Sciences, University of Tuscia, Viterbo, Italy
Interests: soil communities; microbial ecology; molecular ecology; mycology; extreme environments; Antarctica; Arctic
Prof. Dr. Laura Zucconi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Ecological and Biological Sciences, University of Tuscia, 01100 Viterbo, Italy
Interests: mycology; microbial ecology; soil communities; extreme environments; antarctica; arctic; cultural heritage

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is well-known that fungi dominate the microbial biomass in all terrestrial environments and play key roles in ecosystem functioning as symbionts (mycorrhizae, endophytes, lichens), pathogens, and decomposers, thus influencing plant primary production, elements mineralization and sequestration, soil structure, and fertility, and acting in the regulation of soil carbon balance. Nevertheless, the processes underpinning fungal community assembly remain largely unknown. Recently, fungal species on Earth were estimated to number around 12 million, the majority of which remain to be discovered. A number of novel taxa have been established in the last decade, and high-throughput sequencing techniques are expected to reveal in the near future this potential enormous diversity. Besides the fungal diversity, the mechanisms governing the microbial community processes and how they influence the ecological communities also remain poorly understood. These gaps make this research field of extreme interest, also in the light of the wide metabolic potential already demonstrated for soil fungi. Additionally, due to the still-limited knowledge of this kingdom, it is difficult to comprehensively assess the influence of environmental changes on terrestrial fungal communities of different biomes in terms of the adaptation, migration, acclimatization, or extinction of their components.

This Special Issue wishes to encourage the submission of original research papers and review manuscripts dealing with the composition, evolution and adaptations of soil fungal communities and the environmental conditions determining their establishment and survival, aiming to gain the widest possible vision of these ecosystems.

Dr. Fabiana Canini
Prof. Dr. Laura Zucconi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • ecology
  • mycology
  • soil communities
  • adaptation
  • evolution

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Growth Forms and Functional Guilds Distribution of Soil Fungi in Coastal Versus Inland Sites of Victoria Land, Antarctica
Biology 2021, 10(4), 320; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology10040320 - 11 Apr 2021
Viewed by 751
Abstract
In Victoria Land, Antarctica, ice-free areas are restricted to coastal regions and dominate the landscape of the McMurdo Dry Valleys. These two environments are subjected to different pressures that determine the establishment of highly adapted fungal communities. Within the kingdom of fungi, filamentous, [...] Read more.
In Victoria Land, Antarctica, ice-free areas are restricted to coastal regions and dominate the landscape of the McMurdo Dry Valleys. These two environments are subjected to different pressures that determine the establishment of highly adapted fungal communities. Within the kingdom of fungi, filamentous, yeasts and meristematic/microcolonial growth forms on one side and different lifestyles on the other side may be considered adaptive strategies of particular interest in the frame of Antarctic constraints. In this optic, soil fungal communities from both coastal and Dry Valleys sites, already characterized thorough ITS1 metabarcoding sequencing, have been compared to determine the different distribution of phyla, growth forms, and lifestyles. Though we did not find significant differences in the richness between the two environments, the communities were highly differentiated and Dry Valleys sites had a higher evenness compared to coastal ones. Additionally, the distribution of different growth forms and lifestyles were well differentiated, and their diversity and composition were likely influenced by soil abiotic parameters, among which soil granulometry, pH, P, and C contents were the potential main determinants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diversity of Soil Fungal Communities)
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Article
Diversity of Mycobiota Associated with the Cereal Cyst Nematode Heterodera filipjevi Originating from Some Localities of the Pannonian Plain in Serbia
Biology 2021, 10(4), 283; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology10040283 - 01 Apr 2021
Viewed by 533
Abstract
Cereals, particularly wheat, are staple food of the people from the Balkans, dating back to the Neolithic age. In Serbia, cereals are predominantly grown in its northern part between 44° and 45.5° N of the Pannonian Plain. One of the most economically important [...] Read more.
Cereals, particularly wheat, are staple food of the people from the Balkans, dating back to the Neolithic age. In Serbia, cereals are predominantly grown in its northern part between 44° and 45.5° N of the Pannonian Plain. One of the most economically important nematodes on wheat is the cereal cyst nematode, Heterodera filipjevi. Cysts of H. filipjevi survive in soil for years and shelter a large number of microorganisms. The aims of this study were to investigate the diversity of mycobiota associated with the cereal cyst nematode H. filipjevi, to infer phylogenetic relationships of the found mycobiota, and to explore the ecological connection between fungi and the field history, including the potential of fungi in bioremediation and the production of novel bioactive compounds. Cysts were isolated from soil samples with a Spears apparatus and collected on a 150-µm sieve. The cysts were placed on potato dextrose agar, and maintained for two weeks at 27°C. Following fungal isolation and colony growing, the fungal DNA was extracted, the ITS region was amplified, and PCR products were sequenced. The study showed that the isolated fungal species belong to diverse phyla, including Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Mucoromycota. Ascomycota is represented by the families Clavicipitaceae, Sarocladiaceae, Nectriaceae, and Phaeosphaeriaceae. Basidiomycota is represented by the families Cerrenaceae, Polyporaceae, Phanerochaetaceae, and Meruliaceae, and the order Cantharellales. The family Mortierellaceae represents Mucoromycota. The members of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota both depict the field history. Ascomycota indicate the fungal infection is of recent origin, while Basidiomycota point toward the preceding host plants, enabling the plant field colonization history to be traced chronologically. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diversity of Soil Fungal Communities)
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