Special Issue "Prevention and Diagnosis of Gynaecological Cancers"

A special issue of Biology (ISSN 2079-7737). This special issue belongs to the section "Medical Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2022 | Viewed by 1392

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Maria Paraskevaidi
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
1. Department of Metabolism, Digestion and Reproduction, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, UK
2. School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE, UK
Interests: gynaecological cancers; clinical diagnostics; early detection; innovative diagnostics; metabolomics; vibrational spectroscopy; liquid biopsies
Prof. Dr. Evangelos Paraskevaidis
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannin, Greece
Interests: gynaecological cancers; human pappilomavirus (HPV); HPV vaccination; cervical cancer; cervical intraepithelian neoplasia (CIN); cervical screening; colposcopy
Prof. Dr. Kassio Lima
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN 59078-970, Brazil
Interests: microbiological assays; biospectroscopy; cancer and normal cells; pharmaceutical; gold nanoparticles for colorectal cancer cell imaging; proteomic and metabolomic approaches; multivariate data analysis; statistics; machine learning
Prof. Dr. Maria Kyrgiou
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
1. Department of Metabolism, Digestion and Reproduction, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, UK
2. Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London W2 1NY, UK
Interests: gynaecological cancers; human pappilomavirus (HPV); HPV vaccination; cervical cancer; cervical intraepithelian neoplasia (CIN); cervical screening; ovarian cancer; endometrial cancer; microbiome; epigenetics; organoids
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Ilkka Kalliala
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
1. Department of Metabolism, Digestion and Reproduction, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, UK
2. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland
Interests: gynaecological cancers; human pappilomavirus (HPV); HPV vaccination; cervical cancer; cervical intraepithelian neoplasia (CIN); cervical screening; ovarian cancer; endometrial caner; systematic reviews; meta-analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Gynaecologic malignancies continue to be a major cause of cancer-related mortality. While only a fraction of gynaecological cancers is attributable to inherited genetic predisposition, other features have recently attracted the scientific interest as contributing factors toward malignant transformation. Recent advances in the fields of genomics, epigenetics, proteomics, metabolomics and microbiome, among others, have all contributed to the better understanding of carcinogenesis. Innovative approaches that can be used to unravel mechanisms of carcinogenesis, provide a timely and accurate diagnosis or allow the development of screening/prognostic biomarkers are urgently needed.

The aim of this Special Issue is to shed light on novel approaches and techniques that can be used in a series of clinical applications to improve the diagnosis and outcomes of patients affected by female cancers, making a difference with long-lasting impact in women’s health. We are especially interested in studies involving women who have developed or are at risk of developing vulval, vaginal, cervical, endometrial or ovarian cancer.

We welcome the submission of original research articles, short communications, and reviews focusing on current methodologies for the detection and better understanding of female cancers. Translational research with a focus on point-of-care diagnostics is also encouraged. This Special Issue will provide an overview of the current knowledge on this topic and promote innovative techniques for the screening, diagnosis and treatment of gynaecological malignancies.

Dr. Maria Paraskevaidi
Prof. Evangelos Paraskevaidis
Prof. Dr. Kassio Lima
Dr. Maria Kyrgiou
Dr. Ilkka Kalliala
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biology is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • screening
  • early diagnosis
  • cervical cancer
  • human papillomavirus (HPV)
  • endometrial cancer
  • ovarian cancer
  • vulval cancer
  • vaginal cancer
  • biomarker discovery
  • genomics, epigenetics
  • proteomics
  • metabolomics
  • microbiome

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
The Influence of Sexual Behavior and Demographic Characteristics in the Expression of HPV-Related Biomarkers in a Colposcopy Population of Reproductive Age Greek Women
Biology 2021, 10(8), 713; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology10080713 - 26 Jul 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 817
Abstract
Despite the significant scientific evolution in primary and secondary cervical cancer prevention in the battle started by George Papanicolaou in the previous century, global cervical cancer mortality rates remain disappointing. The widespread implementation of HPV-related molecular markers has paved the way to tremendous [...] Read more.
Despite the significant scientific evolution in primary and secondary cervical cancer prevention in the battle started by George Papanicolaou in the previous century, global cervical cancer mortality rates remain disappointing. The widespread implementation of HPV-related molecular markers has paved the way to tremendous developments in cervical cancer screening, with the transition from cytological approach to the more accurate and cost-effective HPV testing modalities. However, the academic audience and different health systems have not yet adopted a universal approach in screening strategies, and even artificial intelligence modalities have been utilized from the multidisciplinary scientific armamentarium. Combination algorithms, scoring systems as well as artificial intelligent models have been so far proposed for cervical screening and management. The impact of sexual lifestyle inherently possesses a key role in the prevalence of HPV-related biomarkers. This study aimed to investigate any possible influence of sexual behavior and demographic characteristics in the expression of HPV-related biomarkers in a colposcopy population from October 2016 to June 2017, and corroborated the determining role of age at fist intercourse; the older the age, the lower the probability for DNA positivity. Multivariate analysis illustrated additionally that a number of sexual partners exceeding 4.2 was crucial, with women with ≤5 partners being approximately four times less likely to harbor a positive HPV DNA test (p < 0.0001). Similarly, a reported partner change during the last year before HPV DNA assessment contributed to 2.5 times higher odds for DNA positivity (p = 0.0006). From this perspective, the further development and validation of scoring systems quantifying lifestyle factors that could reflect cervical precancer risk seems paramount. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prevention and Diagnosis of Gynaecological Cancers)
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