Special Issue "Implantable Medical Devices"

A special issue of Bioengineering (ISSN 2306-5354).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 February 2019)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Elizabeth A Friis

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: orthopaedic biomechanics; biomaterials; medical devices; technology entrepreneurship; mechanical testing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Research that will lead to the eventual development of implantable medical devices must be of the highest scientific standards in order to help ensure patient safety. However, those of us who specialize in this research also understand that other considerations must often be made when designing these projects. Future regulatory and reimbursement considerations must be made when setting up research on implantable medical devices. In this way, the probability that the research will be applied to and useful for a commercially viable device is enhanced.  

In order to highlight this type of research, the MDPI journal, Bioengineering, is offering this Special Issue dedicated to research on implantable medical devices. The goal of this issue is to highlight cutting-edge research that has a high probability of leading to either improvements in or development of medical implants. The research presented can range from basic science studies to biomechanics and biomaterials work to testing in large animals. This issue will include a broad range of novel research related to medical devices across all sectors.

Topics include, but are not limited to, research on development and evaluation of implants in the areas of:

  • Orthopaedic and spine
  • Cardiovascular
  • Pulmonary
  • Neural
  • Drug delivery

Prof. Dr. Elizabeth A Friis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Bioengineering is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle The Impact of a New “Inverted Arch” Prosthetic Annuloplasty Ring on the Mitral Valve’s 3-D Motion: An Experimental Ex-Vivo Study
Bioengineering 2019, 6(2), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering6020031
Received: 2 February 2019 / Revised: 31 March 2019 / Accepted: 4 April 2019 / Published: 8 April 2019
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Abstract
This experimental study aimed to evaluate the ex-vivo three-dimensional (3-D) motion of the Inverted Arch Ring (IAR), an innovative new design concept for a flexible incomplete annuloplasty prosthesis with an incorporated stabilizing rigid arch that can be used in correcting mitral valve regurgitation. [...] Read more.
This experimental study aimed to evaluate the ex-vivo three-dimensional (3-D) motion of the Inverted Arch Ring (IAR), an innovative new design concept for a flexible incomplete annuloplasty prosthesis with an incorporated stabilizing rigid arch that can be used in correcting mitral valve regurgitation. Twenty explanted porcine hearts were placed in a circulation simulation system. Ultrasonometry transducers implanted in the mitral annulus were used to measure the 3-D valvular motion during a simulated cardiac cycle. Annular distance measurements were recorded and compared in each heart before and after the implantation of the IAR prosthesis at pressures corresponding to mid-systole and mid-diastole. Distances measured in mid-systole and mid-diastole demonstrated no significant differences in annular motion or in valve areas either prior to or after IAR implantation. Therefore, the results of this study confirm the minimal effects exerted by the IAR prosthesis on the mitral valve’s 3-D motion during a simulated cardiac cycle. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Implantable Medical Devices)
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Open AccessArticle Stacked PZT Discs Generate Necessary Power for Bone Healing through Electrical Stimulation in a Composite Spinal Fusion Implant
Bioengineering 2018, 5(4), 90; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering5040090
Received: 26 August 2018 / Revised: 8 October 2018 / Accepted: 13 October 2018 / Published: 23 October 2018
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Abstract
Electrical stimulation devices can be used as adjunct therapy to lumbar spinal fusion to promote bone healing, but their adoption has been hindered by the large battery packs necessary to provide power. Piezoelectric composite materials within a spinal interbody cage to produce power [...] Read more.
Electrical stimulation devices can be used as adjunct therapy to lumbar spinal fusion to promote bone healing, but their adoption has been hindered by the large battery packs necessary to provide power. Piezoelectric composite materials within a spinal interbody cage to produce power in response to physiological lumbar loads have recently been investigated. A piezoelectric macro-fiber composite spinal interbody generated sufficient power to stimulate bone growth in a pilot ovine study, despite fabrication challenges. The objective of the present study was to electromechanically evaluate three new piezoelectric disc composites, 15-disc insert, seven-disc insert, and seven-disc Compliant Layer Adaptive Composite Stack (CLACS) insert, within a spinal interbody, and validate their use for electrical stimulation and promoting bone growth. All implants were electromechanically assessed under cyclic loads of 1000 N at 2 Hz, representing physiological lumbar loading. All three configurations produced at least as much power as the piezoelectric macro-fiber composites, validating the use of piezoelectric discs for this application. Future work is needed to characterize the electromechanical performance of commercially manufactured piezoelectric stacks under physiological lumbar loads, and mechanically assess the composite implants according to FDA guidelines for lumbar interbody fusion devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Implantable Medical Devices)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Cardiac Assist Devices: Early Concepts, Current Technologies, and Future Innovations
Bioengineering 2019, 6(1), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering6010018
Received: 21 December 2018 / Revised: 21 January 2019 / Accepted: 2 February 2019 / Published: 15 February 2019
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Abstract
Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a debilitating condition that afflicts tens of millions of people worldwide and is responsible for more deaths each year than all cancers combined. Because donor hearts for transplantation are in short supply, a safe and durable means of [...] Read more.
Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a debilitating condition that afflicts tens of millions of people worldwide and is responsible for more deaths each year than all cancers combined. Because donor hearts for transplantation are in short supply, a safe and durable means of mechanical circulatory support could extend the lives and reduce the suffering of millions. But while the profusion of blood pumps available to clinicians in 2019 tend to work extremely well in the short term (hours to weeks/months), every long-term cardiac assist device on the market today is limited by the same two problems: infections caused by percutaneous drivelines and thrombotic events associated with the use of blood-contacting surfaces. A fundamental change in device design is needed to address both these problems and ultimately make a device that can support the heart indefinitely. Toward that end, several groups are currently developing devices without blood-contacting surfaces and/or extracorporeal power sources with the aim of providing a safe, tether-free means to support the failing heart over extended periods of time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Implantable Medical Devices)
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Other

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Open AccessPerspective Data Integration and Interoperability for Patient-Centered Remote Monitoring of Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices
Bioengineering 2019, 6(1), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering6010025
Received: 1 February 2019 / Revised: 1 March 2019 / Accepted: 7 March 2019 / Published: 17 March 2019
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Abstract
The prevalence of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices with remote monitoring capabilities continues to grow, resulting in increased volume and complexity of biomedical data. These data can provide diagnostic information for timely intervention and maintenance of implanted devices, improving quality of care. Current remote [...] Read more.
The prevalence of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices with remote monitoring capabilities continues to grow, resulting in increased volume and complexity of biomedical data. These data can provide diagnostic information for timely intervention and maintenance of implanted devices, improving quality of care. Current remote monitoring procedures do not utilize device diagnostics to their potential, due to the lack of interoperability and data integration among proprietary systems and electronic medical record platforms. However, the development of a technical framework that standardizes the data and improves interoperability shows promise for improving remote monitoring. Along with encouraging the implementation of this framework, we challenge the current paradigm and propose leveraging the framework to provide patients with their remote monitoring data. Patient-centered remote monitoring may empower patients and improve collaboration and care with health care providers. In this paper, we describe the implementation of technology to deliver remote monitoring data to patients in two recent studies. Our body of work explains the potential for developing a patent-facing information display that affords the meaningful use of implantable device data and enhances interactions with providers. This paradigm shift in remote monitoring—empowering the patient with data—is critical to using the vast amount of complex and clinically relevant biomedical data captured and transmitted by implantable devices to full potential. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Implantable Medical Devices)
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