Special Issue "Discovery of the "Neural World": Technological and Clinical Advances in Neural Engineering"

A special issue of Bioengineering (ISSN 2306-5354).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2022 | Viewed by 1508

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Sébastien Rimbert
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Inria Bordeaux Sud-Ouest, 33405 Talence, France
Interests: motor processing; brain computer interface; anesthesia
Dr. Carlo Ricciardi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, University of Naples "Federico II", 80125 Naples, Italy
Interests: gait and motion analysis; wearables; machine learning; statistical analysis; rehabilitation engineering; radiomics; healthcare; neurology; lean six sigma
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Neural engineering is one of the most interdisciplinary branches of biomedical engineering. With the aim of deeply investigating, controlling, and enhancing the functions of the nervous system, neural engineering research lies at the crossroads of different areas, ranging from neurology and computational neuroscience to bioimage and biosignal processing up to electrical engineering, computer science, and material science.

In particular, the availability of tools with high computational power and the recent advancements of artificial intelligence, brain–computer interfaces, and extended reality in medicine, are shaping the future of neural engineering, paving the way to the development of novel engineering methods, approaches, and solutions able to revolutionize the human capability of exploring and controlling the "neural world".

The Special Issue aims to collect scientific contributions in the wide area of neural engineering. Original research papers and reviews are welcome on advances in neural sensors, devices, and systems; machine– and brain–computer interfaces; neuroimaging and neurorehabilitation; neural signal processing; and so on. The Special Issue also highly encourages submissions focused on theoretical and practical applications of artificial intelligence algorithms, mathematical models, computational methods, and extended reality tools in the field of neurology and neuroscience.

Furthermore, authors of selected papers presented at the 2022 IEEE International Conference on Metrology for eXtended Reality, Artificial Intelligence, and Neural Engineering (IEEE MetroXRAINE 2022 - metroxraine.org) are invited to submit an extended version of their papers to this Special Issue. All submitted papers will undergo the standard peer-review procedure.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been previously published, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). Conference papers should be cited and noted on the paper. Please note that submitted extended papers should contain at least 50% new content (e.g., in the form of technical extensions, more in-depth evaluations, or additional use cases) and not exceed 30% copy/paste from the original conference paper.

Dr. Sébastien Rimbert
Dr. Carlo Ricciardi
Dr. Alfonso Maria Ponsiglione
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Bioengineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • neural engineering
  • neuroimaging
  • neural sensors, devices, and systems
  • brain–computer interfaces (BCIs)
  • brain–machine interfaces
  • neural interfaces
  • electroencephalography (EEG)
  • functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)
  • neural signal processing and analysis
  • neuromodulation
  • neurorehabilitation
  • neural networks in biomedicine
  • neural modeling and simulation
  • computational neuroscience
  • artificial intelligence in neurology and neuroscience
  • extended reality in neurology and neuroscience
  • central/peripheral nervous system investigation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Relationships between the Clinical Test Results and Neurophysiological Findings in Patients with Thoracic Outlet Syndrome
Bioengineering 2022, 9(10), 598; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering9100598 - 21 Oct 2022
Viewed by 551
Abstract
A thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is the type of brachial plexus disorder most difficult to objectively assess using a clinical examination and differential diagnosis. Its symptoms can be frequently misdiagnosed, especially among others with cervical disc-root conflicts, plexopathies, and peripheral neuropathies. In this [...] Read more.
A thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is the type of brachial plexus disorder most difficult to objectively assess using a clinical examination and differential diagnosis. Its symptoms can be frequently misdiagnosed, especially among others with cervical disc-root conflicts, plexopathies, and peripheral neuropathies. In this study, we aim to identify the correlations between positive Doppler ultrasonography results indicating pathological changes in the subclavian flow velocity, clinical tests, and chosen clinical neurophysiology recordings as proposed alternative or supplementary diagnostic tools for evaluating TOS patients. Sixty TOS patients with positive Doppler ultrasonography and Roos test results and sixty healthy people as a control group were bilaterally examined, and the results were compared. Pain intensity was assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Sensory perceptions within C4–C8 dermatomes were assessed with Von Frey filament (FvF) tests. The activity of motor units in the proximal and distal muscles of the upper extremities was evaluated using surface electromyography (sEMG) during maximal contractions before and after a provocative raised hands test (RHT). An electroneurography (ENG) was used to evaluate the transmission of nerve impulses peripherally. Motor evoked potential (MEP) recordings, induced by the over-vertebral magnetic stimulation of the C5–C7 neuromeres, were used to examine motor transmissions from the cervical motor centres to the upper extremities muscles. The results revealed a relationship between positive Doppler test scores and pathological changes in the subclavian flow velocity through the results of the following diagnostic tools: a VAS score of 1.9 was detected on average, superficial sensory perception abnormalities were found in the innervation areas of the ulnar nerves detected by FvF tests, a decrease in the amplitudes of sEMG recordings was seen in distal rather than proximal muscles (especially following the RHT), a decrease in the motor and sensory peripheral transmissions of nerve impulses in the median, ulnar and cutaneous anterobrachial median nerves was seen, as well as MEP amplitudes recorded from the abductor pollicis brevis muscle. The provocative RHT combined with sEMG and MEP recordings can be considered accurate and objective clinical neurophysiology tools that could supplement the commonly used clinical tests. Such an approach may result in a more precise neurogenic TOS diagnostic algorithm. Full article
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Article
Non-Invasive Transcutaneous Spinal DC Stimulation as a Neurorehabilitation ALS Therapy in Awake G93A Mice: The First Step to Clinical Translation
Bioengineering 2022, 9(9), 441; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering9090441 - 05 Sep 2022
Viewed by 604
Abstract
Spinal direct current stimulation (sDCS) modulates motoneuron (MN) excitability beyond the stimulation period, making it a potential neurorehabilitation therapy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a MN degenerative disease in which MN excitability dysfunction plays a critical and complex role. Recent evidence confirms induced [...] Read more.
Spinal direct current stimulation (sDCS) modulates motoneuron (MN) excitability beyond the stimulation period, making it a potential neurorehabilitation therapy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a MN degenerative disease in which MN excitability dysfunction plays a critical and complex role. Recent evidence confirms induced changes in MN excitability via measured MN electrophysiological properties in the SOD1 ALS mouse during and following invasive subcutaneous sDCS (ssDCS). The first aim of our pilot study was to determine the clinical potential of these excitability changes at symptom onset (P90-P105) in ALS via a novel non-invasive transcutaneous sDCS (tsDCS) treatment paradigm on un-anesthetized SOD1-G93A mice. The primary outcomes were motor function and survival. Unfortunately, skin damage avoidance limited the strength of applied stimulation intensity, likewise limiting measurable primary effects. The second aim of this study was to determine which orientation of stimulation (anodal vs cathodal, which are expected to have opposing effects) is beneficial vs harmful in ALS. Despite the lack of measured primary effects, strong trends in survival of the anodal stimulation group, combined with an analysis of survival variance and correlations among symptoms, suggest anodal stimulation is harmful at symptom onset. Therefore, cathodal stimulation may be beneficial at symptom onset if a higher stimulation intensity can be safely achieved via subcutaneously implanted electrodes or alternative methods. Importantly, the many logistical, physical, and stimulation parameters explored in developing this novel non-invasive treatment paradigm on unanesthetized mice provide insight into an appropriate and feasible methodology for future tsDCS study designs and potential clinical translation. Full article
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