Special Issue "Biomedical Photoacoustic and Photothermal Sensing and Imaging"

A special issue of Bioengineering (ISSN 2306-5354).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Professor Marcus Wolff

Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Germany
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Guest Editor
Professor Bernd Baumann

Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Germany
E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,


Photoacoustic (PA) and photothermal (PT) phenomena are based on the absorption of electromagnetic radiation and the subsequent generation of heat. In the case of PA, a modulated thermal source generates acoustic waves. Signals from the absorbing molecules can be obtained with spectroscopic specificity and traced back to the point of origin, enabling a high spatial resolution. The according experimental techniques are, therefore, increasingly used to investigate bioengineering issues. Especially biological, medical or diagnostic applications are targeted by current research.


In order to offer a publication platform for peers working in this field, the MDPI journal, Bioengineering, is dedicating a Special Issue to biomedical photoacoustics and photothermal techniques and is asking for your valuable contribution. The special issue will encompass a broad range of PA/PT techniques, including recent advances in instrumentation for both sensing and imaging.


Topics include but are not limited to:

- Photoacoustic sensing and imaging
- Photothermal sensing and imaging
- Radiation sources for PA/PT
- Acoustic/thermal sensors for PA/PT
- Signal processing algorithms for PA/PT
- Image reconstruction algorithms for PA/PT
- Thermal lens applications
- Thermoacoustics applications
- Laser-generated ultrasound


We are looking forward to receiving your contributions for this Special Issue of Bioengineering.


Prof. Dr. Marcus Wolff
Prof. Dr. Bernd Baumann
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Bioengineering is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Acoustic Reconstruction for Photothermal Imaging
Bioengineering 2018, 5(3), 70; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering5030070
Received: 28 July 2018 / Revised: 18 August 2018 / Accepted: 22 August 2018 / Published: 29 August 2018
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Abstract
Pulsed illumination of a sample, e.g., of a biological tissue, causes a sudden temperature increase of light absorbing structures, such as blood vessels, which results in an outgoing acoustic wave, as well as heat diffusion, of the absorbed energy. Both of the signals,
[...] Read more.
Pulsed illumination of a sample, e.g., of a biological tissue, causes a sudden temperature increase of light absorbing structures, such as blood vessels, which results in an outgoing acoustic wave, as well as heat diffusion, of the absorbed energy. Both of the signals, pressure and temperature, can be measured at the sample surface and are used to reconstruct the initial temperature or pressure distribution, called photoacoustic or photothermal reconstruction respectively. We have demonstrated that both signals at the same surface pixel are connected by a temporal transformation. This allows for the calculation of a so-called acoustical virtual wave from the surface temperature evolution as measured by an infrared camera. The virtual wave is the solution of a wave equation and can be used to reconstruct the initial temperature distribution immediately after the excitation pulse. This virtual wave reconstruction method was used for the reconstruction of inclined steel rods in an epoxy sample, which were heated by a short pulse. The reconstructed experimental images show clearly the degradation of the spatial resolution with increasing depth, which is theoretically described by a depth-dependent thermographic point-spread-function. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomedical Photoacoustic and Photothermal Sensing and Imaging)
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Open AccessArticle Label-Free Imaging of Melanoma with Confocal Photothermal Microscopy: Differentiation between Malignant and Benign Tissue
Bioengineering 2018, 5(3), 67; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering5030067
Received: 16 June 2018 / Revised: 10 August 2018 / Accepted: 12 August 2018 / Published: 15 August 2018
PDF Full-text (8195 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Label-free confocal photothermal (CPT) microscopy was utilized for the first time to investigate malignancy in mouse skin cells. Laser diodes (LDs) with 405 nm or 488 nm wavelengths were used as pumps, and a 638 nm LD was used as a probe for
[...] Read more.
Label-free confocal photothermal (CPT) microscopy was utilized for the first time to investigate malignancy in mouse skin cells. Laser diodes (LDs) with 405 nm or 488 nm wavelengths were used as pumps, and a 638 nm LD was used as a probe for the CPT microscope. A Grey Level Cooccurrence Matrix (GLCM) for texture analysis was applied to the CPT images. Nine GLCM parameters were calculated with definite definitions for the intracellular super-resolved CPT images, and the parameters Entropy, Contrast, and Variance were found to be most suited among the nine parameters to discriminate clearly between healthy cells and malignant cells when a 405 nm pump was used. Prominence, Variance, and Shade were most suited when a pump wavelength of 488 nm was used. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomedical Photoacoustic and Photothermal Sensing and Imaging)
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