Advanced Bioremediation Technologies and Processes

A special issue of Bioengineering (ISSN 2306-5354). This special issue belongs to the section "Biochemical Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 7551

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Water Research Institute, IRSA-CNR, 00015 Monterotondo, Italy
Interests: bioremediation; biomonitoring; chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons; polychlorobiphenyls; petroleum hydrocarbons; reductive and oxidative dechlorination; bioelectrochemical remediation; nanoparticles; circular economy
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Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Sapienza University of Rome, Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome, Italy
Interests: bioremediation; chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; petroleum hydrocarbons; polyhydroxyalkanoates; biodegradable polymers; surfactants; biobased sorbent materials; reductive dechlorination; coupled adsorption and biodegradation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Bioremediation is one of the most appealing approaches for the sustainable restoration of environmental matrices contaminated by organic or inorganic compounds. Various strategies, including natural attenuation, biostimulation, and bioaugmentation, can be applied to face the restoration of contaminated sites. Therefore, there is a need for the development of innovative, sustainable, and effective biotechnologies and bioprocess for the successful transfer of laboratory-based practice to real applications. To this aim, all aspects linked to bioprocesses need to be considered, including microbiology, molecular biology, biochemistry, engineering, and the management of contaminated sites.

This Special Issue on “Advanced Bioremediation Technologies and Processes” will focus on original research papers and comprehensive reviews, dealing with cutting-edge bioprocesses and technologies for sustainable, effective, and multidisciplinary restoration of contaminated sites. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Development of innovative bioremediation technologies for the restoration of contaminated environmental matrices;
  • Novel bioprocesses for remediation; 
  • Advances in the characterization and monitoring of contaminated sites;
  • Biomolecular tools for bioremediation;
  • Circular economy in bioremediation technologies;
  • Bio-based materials for bioremediation applications.

Our efforts will be focused on collecting original papers and reviews covering the latest advances and novel perspectives in the biotechnologies and processes for the remediation of contaminated sites.

Dr. Bruna Matturro
Dr. Laura Lorini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Bioengineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bioremediation
  • bioprocesses
  • circular economy
  • advanced technologies
  • contaminated groundwater
  • contaminated soil

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 1257 KiB  
Article
Waste Activated Sludge-High Rate (WASHR) Treatment Process: A Novel, Economically Viable, and Environmentally Sustainable Method to Co-Treat High-Strength Wastewaters at Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants
by Melody Blythe Johnson and Mehrab Mehrvar
Bioengineering 2023, 10(9), 1017; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering10091017 - 29 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1314
Abstract
High-strength wastewaters from a variety of sources, including the food industry, domestic septage, and landfill leachate, are often hauled to municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) for co-treatment. Due to their high organic loadings, these wastewaters can cause process upsets in both a WWTP’s [...] Read more.
High-strength wastewaters from a variety of sources, including the food industry, domestic septage, and landfill leachate, are often hauled to municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) for co-treatment. Due to their high organic loadings, these wastewaters can cause process upsets in both a WWTP’s liquid and solids treatment trains and consume organic treatment capacity, leaving less capacity available to service customers in the catchment area. A novel pre-treatment method, the Waste Activated Sludge-High Rate (WASHR) process, is proposed to optimize the co-treatment of high-strength wastewaters. The WASHR process combines the contact stabilization and sequencing batch reactor processes. It utilizes waste activated sludge from a municipal WWTP as its biomass source, allowing for a rapid start-up. Bench-scale treatment trials of winery wastewater confirm the WASHR process can reduce loadings on the downstream WWTP’s liquid and solids treatment trains. A case study approach is used to confirm the economic viability and environmental sustainability of the WASHR process compared to direct co-treatment, using life-cycle cost analyses and greenhouse gas emissions estimates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Bioremediation Technologies and Processes)
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14 pages, 3682 KiB  
Article
Bioremediation of Neonicotinoid Pesticide, Imidacloprid, Mediated by Bacillus cereus
by Farah Naz Talpur, Ahsanullah Unar, Sana Kanwal Bhatti, Laila Alsawalha, Dalia Fouad, Humaira Bashir, Hassan Imran Afridi, Farid Shokry Ataya, Ohoud A. Jefri and Muhammad Sohail Bashir
Bioengineering 2023, 10(8), 951; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering10080951 - 10 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1682
Abstract
Imidacloprid, a toxic pesticide of the chloronicotinyl category, is employed extensively in agricultural fields, and its exposure causes serious health issues. Biodegradation is considered to be a green and economical approach to remediate pesticides. Herein, imidacloprid degradation efficiency of Bacillus sp. is highlighted, [...] Read more.
Imidacloprid, a toxic pesticide of the chloronicotinyl category, is employed extensively in agricultural fields, and its exposure causes serious health issues. Biodegradation is considered to be a green and economical approach to remediate pesticides. Herein, imidacloprid degradation efficiency of Bacillus sp. is highlighted, among which Bacillus cereus exhibited the greatest degradation; optimization of experimental variables (pH, imidacloprid and agitation time) via Box–Behnken factorial design and analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed 92% biodegradation at the initial substrate concentration of 0.03 mM, aerobically in 11 days under favorable pH 7. The subsequent metabolites, identified through liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry, were 5-hydroxy imidacloprid, imidacloprid-guanidine and 6-chloronicotinic acid. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Bioremediation Technologies and Processes)
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16 pages, 4213 KiB  
Article
Aerated Static Pile Composting for Industrial Biowastes: From Engineering to Microbiology
by Zi Xiang Keng, Jamie Jean Minn Tan, Bao Lee Phoon, Chee Chang Khoo, Ianatul Khoiroh, Siewhui Chong, Christinavimala Supramaniam, Ajit Singh and Guan-Ting Pan
Bioengineering 2023, 10(8), 938; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering10080938 - 7 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1781
Abstract
This work demonstrated the feasibility of an industrial-scale aerated static pile composting system for treating one of the common biowastes—soybean curd residue. The mixing ratios of the feedstock were optimized to achieve a carbon–nitrogen ratio and a moisture level in the ranges of [...] Read more.
This work demonstrated the feasibility of an industrial-scale aerated static pile composting system for treating one of the common biowastes—soybean curd residue. The mixing ratios of the feedstock were optimized to achieve a carbon–nitrogen ratio and a moisture level in the ranges of 25–35 and 60–70%, respectively. This open-air composting system required 6–7 months to obtain a mature compost. Solvita and seed germination tests further confirmed the maturity of the compost, with 25% compost extract concentration yielding the best germination index in the absence of phytotoxicity. The bacterial and fungal compositions of the compost piles were further examined with metagenomic analysis. Thermoactinomyces spp., Oceanobacillus spp., and Kroppenstedtia spp. were among the unique bacteria found, and Diutina rugosa, Thermomyces dupontii, and Candida taylorii were among the unique fungi found in the compost piles, suggesting the presence of good microorganisms for degrading the organic biowastes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Bioremediation Technologies and Processes)
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14 pages, 2755 KiB  
Article
Enhancing the Anaerobic Biodegradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Soils with Electrically Conductive Materials
by Carolina Cruz Viggi, Matteo Tucci, Marco Resitano, Valentina Palushi, Simona Crognale, Bruna Matturro, Marco Petrangeli Papini, Simona Rossetti and Federico Aulenta
Bioengineering 2023, 10(4), 441; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering10040441 - 1 Apr 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1898
Abstract
Anaerobic bioremediation is a relevant process in the management of sites contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons. Recently, interspecies electron transfer processes mediated by conductive minerals or particles have been proposed as mechanisms through which microbial species within a community share reducing equivalents to drive [...] Read more.
Anaerobic bioremediation is a relevant process in the management of sites contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons. Recently, interspecies electron transfer processes mediated by conductive minerals or particles have been proposed as mechanisms through which microbial species within a community share reducing equivalents to drive the syntrophic degradation of organic substrates, including hydrocarbons. Here, a microcosm study was set up to investigate the effect of different electrically conductive materials (ECMs) in enhancing the anaerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbons in historically contaminated soil. The results of a comprehensive suite of chemical and microbiological analyses evidenced that supplementing the soil with (5% w/w) magnetite nanoparticles or biochar particles is an effective strategy to accelerate the removal of selected hydrocarbons. In particular, in microcosms supplemented with ECMs, the removal of total petroleum hydrocarbons was enhanced by up to 50% relative to unamended controls. However, chemical analyses suggested that only a partial bioconversion of contaminants occurred and that longer treatment times would have probably been required to drive the biodegradation process to completion. On the other hand, biomolecular analyses confirmed the presence of several microorganisms and functional genes likely involved in hydrocarbon degradation. Furthermore, the selective enrichment of known electroactive bacteria (i.e., Geobacter and Geothrix) in microcosms amended with ECMs, clearly pointed to a possible role of DIET (Diet Interspecies Electron Transfer) processes in the observed removal of contaminants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Bioremediation Technologies and Processes)
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