Three-Dimensional Models of Pediatric Cancers

A special issue of Bioengineering (ISSN 2306-5354).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (4 June 2021) | Viewed by 8759

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia-IBEC, Barcelona, Spain
Interests: biomaterials; 3D models of disease; tissue engineering; cancer; bone
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In vitro three-dimensional (3D) models of human cancer have gained much interest over the last decade. Advancements in bioengineering technologies have allowed the improvement of 3D tumor models to such an extent that they can accurately mimic the tumor microenvironment and predict drug responses, which makes them an invaluable tool for cancer research. However, the research effort to develop predictive pediatric cancer models has been smaller than that invested for adult cancers, and as a result, only a few of these models faithfully recapitulate childhood tumors in vitro.

This Special Issue of Bioengineering on "Three-Dimensional Models of Pediatric Cancers" calls for original research papers and reviews presenting and discussing advanced technologies to build predictive models of pediatric tumors. Topics of interest for this Special Issue include, but are not limited to, the following:

  1. Biomaterials for better mimicking the pediatric tumor microenvironment
  2. Tissue engineering approaches for developing 3D models of pediatric cancers, such as organoids, cell sheet technologies, porous scaffolds, hydrogels, and tumor-on-a-chip, among others
  3. Studies of extracellular vesicles in 3D models of pediatric cancers
  4. Advanced bioengineering technologies and methods to improve 3D pediatric models, such as bioprinting or electrospinning
  5. Studies of drug responses and cancer therapies using 3D models of pediatric cancers
  6. Development of high-throughput platforms using 3D models of pediatric cancers
  7. Advanced image-based techniques to track pediatric cancer cells in 3D constructs

Dr. Aranzazu Villasante
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • Pediatric cancer
  • 3D tumor model
  • Tissue-engineered tumor
  • Biomaterials for cancer research
  • Bioprinting for cancer research
  • Tumor-on-a-chip
  • Cancer organoids

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 19414 KiB  
Communication
Versatile Vessel-on-a-Chip Platform for Studying Key Features of Blood Vascular Tumors
by Marina Llenas, Roberto Paoli, Natalia Feiner-Gracia, Lorenzo Albertazzi, Josep Samitier and David Caballero
Bioengineering 2021, 8(6), 81; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering8060081 - 9 Jun 2021
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 4598
Abstract
Tumor vessel-on-a-chip systems have attracted the interest of the cancer research community due to their ability to accurately recapitulate the multiple dynamic events of the metastatic cascade. Vessel-on-a-chip microfluidic platforms have been less utilized for investigating the distinctive features and functional heterogeneities of [...] Read more.
Tumor vessel-on-a-chip systems have attracted the interest of the cancer research community due to their ability to accurately recapitulate the multiple dynamic events of the metastatic cascade. Vessel-on-a-chip microfluidic platforms have been less utilized for investigating the distinctive features and functional heterogeneities of tumor-derived vascular networks. In particular, vascular tumors are characterized by the massive formation of thrombi and severe bleeding, a rare and life-threatening situation for which there are yet no clear therapeutic guidelines. This is mainly due to the lack of technological platforms capable of reproducing these characteristic traits of the pathology in a simple and well-controlled manner. Herein, we report the fabrication of a versatile tumor vessel-on-a-chip platform to reproduce, investigate, and characterize the massive formation of thrombi and hemorrhage on-chip in a fast and easy manner. Despite its simplicity, this method offers multiple advantages to recapitulate the pathophysiological events of vascular tumors, and therefore, may find useful applications in the field of vascular-related diseases, while at the same time being an alternative to more complex approaches. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Three-Dimensional Models of Pediatric Cancers)
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16 pages, 2612 KiB  
Article
Different Microfluidic Environments for In Vitro Testing of Lipid Nanoparticles against Osteosarcoma
by Oihane Mitxelena-Iribarren, Sara Lizarbe-Sancha, Jay Campisi, Sergio Arana and Maite Mujika
Bioengineering 2021, 8(6), 77; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering8060077 - 4 Jun 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3468
Abstract
The use of lipid nanoparticles as biodegradable shells for controlled drug delivery shows promise as a more effective and targeted tumor treatment than traditional treatment methods. Although the combination of target therapy with nanotechnology created new hope for cancer treatment, methodological issues during [...] Read more.
The use of lipid nanoparticles as biodegradable shells for controlled drug delivery shows promise as a more effective and targeted tumor treatment than traditional treatment methods. Although the combination of target therapy with nanotechnology created new hope for cancer treatment, methodological issues during in vitro validation of nanovehicles slowed their application. In the current work, the effect of methotrexate (MTX) encapsulated in different matrices was evaluated in a dynamic microfluidic platform. Effects on the viability of osteosarcoma cells in the presence of recirculation of cell media, free MTX and two types of blank and drug-containing nanoparticles were successfully assessed in different tumor-mimicking microenvironments. Encapsulated MTX was more effective than the equal dose free drug treatment, as cell death significantly increased under the recirculation of both types of drug-loaded nanoparticles in all concentrations. In fact, MTX-nanoparticles reduced cell population 50 times more than the free drug when 150-µM drug dose was recirculated. Moreover, when compared to the equivalent free drug dose recirculation, cell number was reduced 60 and 100 points more under recirculation of each nanoparticle with a 15-µM drug concentration. Thus, the results obtained with the microfluidic model present MTX-lipid nanoparticles as a promising and more effective therapy for pediatric osteosarcoma treatment than current treatment options. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Three-Dimensional Models of Pediatric Cancers)
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