Special Issue "Valorization of Beverage Industry By-products"

A special issue of Beverages (ISSN 2306-5710).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Dimitris P. Makris
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Green Processes & Biorefinery Group, School of Agricultural Sciences, University of Thessaly, N. Temponera Street, Karditsa – 43100, Greece
Tel. +30-24410-64792
Interests: antioxidants; biorefinery; food waste valorization; green processes; polyphenols
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,                

It is my pleasure to announce a new Special Issue of Beverages, entitled “Valorization of Beverage Industry By-products”.

Nowadays, the beverage industry sectors faces unprecedented challenges pertaining to the rational and eco-friendly management of processing residues. This waste biomass, if not properly handled and processed, poses an important risk to the environment, owing to its particularly high organic load. On the other hand, contemporary trends dictate the valorization of beverage industry wastes, which offers numerous routes for high value-added product formulation, in the framework of a biorefinery concept.

The processing residues generated by the beverage industry contain a wide spectrum of bioactive substances, including polyphenols, carotenoids, pectins, oil, etc. Methods of extraction, isolation, chemical and biotechnological modification, as well as utilisation as food additives, cosmetic constituents and pharmaceutical bioactives are state-of-the-art environmentally benign strategies for the effective and profitable valorisation of these substances.

This Special Issue addresses the concept of innovative and emerging green methodologies that aim at upgrading beverage industry wastes. Contributions pertaining to the valorisation of beverage wastes should include studies on the pre-treatment of processing residues, the sustainable production of isolated bioactive compounds or whole extracts, the bioconversion of processing residues, novel ingredients from beverage wastes, and their utilisation in the food, cosmetic or pharmaceutical industries. The exploitation of wastes to produce bio-based substances are also welcome, but investigations on biofuels are strongly discouraged.

May I take this opportunity to thank you in advance for your valuable contributions.

Dr. Dimitris P. Makris
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Beverages is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Pre-treatment of processing residues
  • Beverage waste valorization
  • Bioactive substances
  • Green processes and biorefinery
  • Value-added products

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Drying Optimisation to Obtain Carotenoid-Enriched Extracts from Industrial Peach Processing Waste (Pomace)
Beverages 2019, 5(3), 43; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages5030043 - 02 Jul 2019
Abstract
In this study, peach pomace (PP) moisture reduction using conventional oven-drying was investigated by implementing the Box-Behnken experimental design, considering two major process variables, time—t and temperature—T. The purpose was the optimisation of the process to obtain PP extracts as [...] Read more.
In this study, peach pomace (PP) moisture reduction using conventional oven-drying was investigated by implementing the Box-Behnken experimental design, considering two major process variables, time—t and temperature—T. The purpose was the optimisation of the process to obtain PP extracts as rich as possible in total carotenoids (TCn). It was shown that effective moisture removal up to a final level of approximately 24%, could be achieved after 8.27 h (496 min) at 70 °C. Under these optimised drying conditions, the maximum carotenoid yield was 84.57 ± 8.56 μg CtE g−1 dm. This yield was by almost 63% lower than that achieved using fresh (non-dried) samples. Temperatures higher than 70 °C were demonstrated to be even more detrimental in this regard, yet from the model built, it was made clear that prolonged drying time may bring about a more pronounced negative effect on the total carotenoid yield. The drop in total carotenoid content of PP as a result of drying was accompanied by a significant decline in the antiradical activity of PP extracts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Valorization of Beverage Industry By-products)
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Open AccessArticle
Optimization of Bioactive Substances in the Wastes of Some Selective Mediterranean Crops
Beverages 2019, 5(3), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages5030042 - 01 Jul 2019
Abstract
Production of added products from industrial byproducts is a challenge for the current natural product industry and the extraction field more generally. Therefore, the aim of this study is to valorize the selected Mediterranean crops that can be applied as antioxidants, natural chelating [...] Read more.
Production of added products from industrial byproducts is a challenge for the current natural product industry and the extraction field more generally. Therefore, the aim of this study is to valorize the selected Mediterranean crops that can be applied as antioxidants, natural chelating agents, or even as biosolvents or biofuels after special treatment. In this study, the wastes of popular Mediterranean plants were extracted via homogenizer-assisted extraction (HAE) by applying response surface methodology (RSM) to examine the effects of process parameters on the total biophenolic contents (TBCs) of their residues. Box–Behnken design model equations calculated for each system were found significant (p < 0.0001) with an adequate value of determination coefficient (R2). Olive leaf had the highest TBC content (58.62 mg-GAE/g-DW with 0.1 g sample, 42.5% ethanol at 6522.2 rpm for 2 min), followed by mandarin peel (27.79 mg-GAE/g-DW with 0.1 g sample, 34.24% ethanol at 8772 rpm for 1.99 min), grapefruit peel (21.12 mg-GAE/g-DW with 0.1 g sample, 42.33% ethanol at 5000 rpm for 1.125 min) and lemon peel (16.89 mg-GAE/g-DW with 0.1 g sample, 33.62% ethanol at 5007 rpm for 1.282 min). The antioxidant activities of the extracts were measured by several in vitro studies. The most prominent biophenols of the wastes were quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Fourier-transform infrared-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were also used for characterization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Valorization of Beverage Industry By-products)
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Open AccessArticle
Increasing the Sustainability of the Coffee Agro-Industry: Spent Coffee Grounds as a Source of New Beverages
Beverages 2018, 4(4), 105; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages4040105 - 17 Dec 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
This work describes a new process for the production of beverages from spent coffee grounds (SCG), as well as the chemical and sensory profiles. The process consisted of the extraction of antioxidant phenolic compounds of SCG, followed by the fermentation of this extract [...] Read more.
This work describes a new process for the production of beverages from spent coffee grounds (SCG), as well as the chemical and sensory profiles. The process consisted of the extraction of antioxidant phenolic compounds of SCG, followed by the fermentation of this extract supplemented with sucrose and fermented broth distillation. Thus, two fermented (10.4% and 10.0% of ethanol, by volume) and two distillated (38.1% and 40.2% of ethanol, by volume) beverages were obtained. A total of 45 and 59 volatile compounds (alcohols, esters, aldehydes, terpenes, lactones, pyrazines, norisoprenoids, volatile phenols and acids) identified and quantified by GC-MS characterized the aroma and flavor of the fermented and distilled beverages, respectively. Twenty sensory descriptors define the sensory profile of the two beverages which corroborated the pleasant smell and taste of coffee in the distillate beverage. Therefore, this work demonstrates that the fermented and distilled beverages obtained from spent coffee grounds have acceptable organoleptic qualities that make them suitable for human consumption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Valorization of Beverage Industry By-products)
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Open AccessArticle
Influence of Various Drying Conditions on Phytochemical Compounds and Antioxidant Activity of Carrot Peel
Beverages 2018, 4(4), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages4040080 - 01 Nov 2018
Abstract
(1) Background: Drying is an important process in the research of bioactive compounds. The aim of this study was to identify an optimal condition to dry carrot peel. (2) Methods: In this study, various drying conditions including hot-air (50 °C and 100 °C), [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Drying is an important process in the research of bioactive compounds. The aim of this study was to identify an optimal condition to dry carrot peel. (2) Methods: In this study, various drying conditions including hot-air (50 °C and 100 °C), vacuum (50 °C and 100 °C), microwave (600 W and 1200 W) and freeze dying (−45 °C) were applied, and the phytochemical yield and antioxidant activity of carrot peel were then assessed. (3) Results: The results showed that the highest amount of phytochemical compounds was achieved by microwave drying at 1200 W, followed by microwave drying at 600 W and freeze drying at −45 °C. In contrast, hot-air drying resulted in the lowest level of phytochemical compounds. Regarding the antioxidant activity of carrot peel, microwave drying at 1200 W was an optimal condition as it possessed the best antioxidant activity whereas hot-air, vacuum and freeze drying were not effective methods for retaining antioxidant activity. (4) Conclusions: Based on the results obtained from this study, microwave drying at 1200 W is recommended to dry carrot peel for potential application in the nutraceutical, beverage and/or functional food industries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Valorization of Beverage Industry By-products)
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