Artificial Intelligence-Based State-of-Health Estimation of Lithium-Ion Batteries—2nd Edition

A special issue of Batteries (ISSN 2313-0105). This special issue belongs to the section "Battery Performance, Ageing, Reliability and Safety".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 June 2024 | Viewed by 6306

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Energy, Aalborg University, 9220 Aalborg, Denmark
Interests: electric vehicles; lithium-ion batteries; smart battery management renewable energy; energy storage; wind power; static synchronous compens.
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Energy, Aalborg University, DK-9220 Aalborg, Denmark
Interests: state of health estimation; lifetime extension; feature engineering; machine learning.
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Lithium-ion batteries have a wide range of applications, but one of their biggest problems is their limited lifetime due to performance degradation during usage. It is, therefore, essential to determine the battery’s state of health (SOH) so that the battery management system can control the battery, enabling it to run in the best state, and thus prolong its lifetime. Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies possess immense potential in inferring battery SOH, and can extract aging information (i.e., SOH features) from measurements and relate them to battery performance parameters, avoiding a complex battery modeling process. Therefore, this Special Issue aims to showcase manuscripts showing efficient SOH estimation methods using AI which exhibit good performance such as high accuracy, high robustness against the changes in working condition, and good generalization, etc.

Potential topics include but are not limited to:

  • Effective data mining of features for AI methods;
  • Network structures (study of different AI technologies);
  • Learning strategies (supervised, unsupervised, reinforcement learning);
  • Transferring AI-based models in between different battery technologies and applications;
  • Sequentially updated models (probabilistic methods, self-learning, etc.);
  • Physics-informed AI method for battery SOH estimation;
  • Digital twins for battery cells or system;
  • Hardware implementation of AI methods.

Prof. Dr. Remus Teodorescu
Dr. Xin Sui
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Batteries is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • lithium-ion battery
  • SOH estimation
  • artificial intelligence
  • lifetime prediction
  • physics-informed AI
  • neural networks
  • supervised learning
  • unsupervised learning
  • self-learning
  • data mining

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 1556 KiB  
Article
State of Health Estimation for Lithium-Ion Battery Based on Sample Transfer Learning under Current Pulse Test
by Yuanyuan Li, Xinrong Huang, Jinhao Meng, Kaibo Shi, Remus Teodorescu and Daniel Ioan Stroe
Batteries 2024, 10(5), 156; https://doi.org/10.3390/batteries10050156 - 2 May 2024
Viewed by 740
Abstract
Considering the diversity of battery data under dynamic test conditions, the stability of battery working data is affected due to the diversity of charge and discharge rates, variability of operating temperature, and randomness of the current state of charge, and the data types [...] Read more.
Considering the diversity of battery data under dynamic test conditions, the stability of battery working data is affected due to the diversity of charge and discharge rates, variability of operating temperature, and randomness of the current state of charge, and the data types are multi-sourced, which increases the difficulty of estimating battery SOH based on data-driven methods. In this paper, a lithium-ion battery state of health estimation method with sample transfer learning under dynamic test conditions is proposed. Through the Tradaboost.R2 method, the weight of the source domain sample data is adjusted to complete the update of the sample data distribution. At the same time, considering the division methods of the six auxiliary and the source domain data set, aging features from different state of charge ranges are selected. It is verified that while the aging feature dimension and the demand for target domain label data are reduced, the estimation accuracy of the lithium-ion battery state of health is not affected by the initial value of the state of charge. By considering the mean absolute error, mean square error and root mean square error, the estimated error results do not exceed 1.2% on the experiment battery data, which highlights the advantages of the proposed methods. Full article
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14 pages, 12337 KiB  
Article
Fast Impedance Spectrum Construction for Lithium-Ion Batteries Using a Multi-Density Clustering Algorithm
by Ling Zhu, Jichang Peng, Jinhao Meng, Chenghao Sun, Lei Cai and Zhizhu Qu
Batteries 2024, 10(3), 112; https://doi.org/10.3390/batteries10030112 - 20 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1287
Abstract
Effectively extracting a lithium-ion battery’s impedance is of great importance for various onboard applications, which requires consideration of both the time consumption and accuracy of the measurement process. Although the pseudorandom binary sequence (PRBS) excitation signal can inject the superposition frequencies with high [...] Read more.
Effectively extracting a lithium-ion battery’s impedance is of great importance for various onboard applications, which requires consideration of both the time consumption and accuracy of the measurement process. Although the pseudorandom binary sequence (PRBS) excitation signal can inject the superposition frequencies with high time efficiency and an easily implementable device, processing the data of the battery’s impedance measurement is still a challenge at present. This study proposes a fast impedance spectrum construction method for lithium-ion batteries, where a multi-density clustering algorithm was designed to effectively extract the useful impedance after PRBS injection. According to the distribution properties of the measurement points by PRBS, a density-based spatial clustering of applications with noise (DBSCAN) was used for processing the data of the lithium-ion battery’s impedance. The two key parameters of the DBSCAN were adjusted by a delicate workflow according to the frequency range. The validation of the proposed method was proved on a 3 Ah lithium-ion battery under nine different test conditions, considering both the SOC and temperature variations. Full article
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15 pages, 4115 KiB  
Article
One-Time Prediction of Battery Capacity Fade Curve under Multiple Fast Charging Strategies
by Xiaoming Han, Zhentao Dai, Mifeng Ren, Jing Cui and Yunfeng Shi
Batteries 2024, 10(3), 74; https://doi.org/10.3390/batteries10030074 - 22 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1629
Abstract
Using different fast charging strategies for lithium-ion batteries can affect the degradation rate of the batteries. In this case, predicting the capacity fade curve can facilitate the application of new batteries. Considering the impact of fast charging strategies on battery aging, a battery [...] Read more.
Using different fast charging strategies for lithium-ion batteries can affect the degradation rate of the batteries. In this case, predicting the capacity fade curve can facilitate the application of new batteries. Considering the impact of fast charging strategies on battery aging, a battery capacity degradation trajectory prediction method based on the TM-Seq2Seq (Trend Matching—Sequence-to-Sequence) model is proposed. This method uses data from the first 100 cycles to predict the future capacity fade curve and EOL (end of life) in one-time. First, features are extracted from the discharge voltage-capacity curve. Secondly, a sequence-to-sequence model based on CNN, SE-net, and GRU is designed. Finally, a trend matching loss function is designed based on the common characteristics of capacity fade curves to constrain the encoding features of the sequence-to-sequence model, facilitating the learning of the underlying relationship between inputs and outputs. TM-Seq2Seq model is verified on a public dataset with 132 battery cells and multiple fast charging strategies. The experimental results indicate that, compared to other popular models, the TM-Seq2Seq model has lower prediction errors. Full article
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21 pages, 154686 KiB  
Article
Design Optimisation of Metastructure Configuration for Lithium-Ion Battery Protection Using Machine Learning Methodology
by Indira Cahyani Fatiha, Sigit Puji Santosa, Djarot Widagdo and Arief Nur Pratomo
Batteries 2024, 10(2), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/batteries10020052 - 1 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1894
Abstract
The market for electric vehicles (EVs) has been growing in popularity, and by 2027, it is predicted that the market valuation will reach $869 billion. To support the growth of EVs in public road safety, advances in battery safety research for EV application [...] Read more.
The market for electric vehicles (EVs) has been growing in popularity, and by 2027, it is predicted that the market valuation will reach $869 billion. To support the growth of EVs in public road safety, advances in battery safety research for EV application should achieve low-cost, lightweight, and high safety protection. In this research, the development of a lightweight, crashworthy battery protection system using an excellent energy absorption capability is carried out. The lightweight structure was developed by using metastructure constructions with an arrangement of repeated lattice cellular structures. Three metastructure configurations (bi-stable, star-shaped, double-U) with their geometrical variables (thickness, inner spacing, cell stack) and material types (stainless steel, aluminium, and carbon steel) were evaluated until the maximum Specific Energy Absorptions (SEA) value was attained. The Finite Element Method (FEM) is utilised to simulate the mechanics of impact and calculate the optimum SEA of the various designs using machine learning methodology. Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) was used to derive the design variation by dividing the variables into 100 samples. The machine learning optimisation method utilises the Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) and Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm-II (NSGA-II) to forecast the design that produces maximum SEA. The optimum control variables are star-shaped cells consisting of one vertical unit cell using aluminium material with a cross-section thickness of 2.9 mm. The optimum design increased the SEA by 5577% compared to the baseline design. The accuracy of the machine learning prediction is also verified using numerical simulation with a 2.83% error. Four different sandwich structure configurations are then constructed using the optimal geometry for prismatic battery protection subjected to ground impact loading conditions. An optimum configuration of 6×4×1 core cells arrangement results in a maximum displacement of 7.33 mm for the prismatic battery in the ground impact simulation, which is still less than the deformation threshold for prismatic battery safety of 10.423 mm. It is shown that the lightweight metastructure is very efficient for prismatic battery protection subjected to ground impact loading conditions. Full article
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