Advances in Regional Climate Modelling

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Climatology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (5 July 2023) | Viewed by 5381

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Natural Resources Institute - IRN, Federal University of Itajubá, Itajubá, Minas Gerais 37500-903, Brazil
Interests: climate; climate modeling; synoptic meteorology
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Guest Editor
Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37830, USA
Interests: global and regional climate models; earth system modeling; climate variability; climate change; climate change impacts

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Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Kowloon 518057, Hong Kong, China
Interests: climate modeling; regional climate; extreme events

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Guest Editor
Departamento de Meteorologia, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-916, Brazil
Interests: climate variability; climate change; climate modeling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Regional climate modeling, since its beginning in the late 1980s, has evolved in terms of model complexity, horizontal resolution, physical parameterization, etc. Regional climate models (RCMs) have been used in a wide range of applications, including an understanding of physical processes, seasonal climate predictions, and climate change simulations. Recently, through the use of non-hydrostatic configurations, convective permitting simulations have also been carried out, allowing improvements in the investigation of various mesoscale systems. The aim of this Special Issue is to publish articles focused on these recent advances in regional climate modeling. The keywords below indicate the wide spectrum of topics that can be addressed in this issue.

Dr. Michelle Simões Reboita
Dr. Moetasim Ashfaq
Dr. Eun-Soon Im
Dr. Fernanda Cerqueira Vasconcellos
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • bias correction techniques
  • parameterization scheme performance
  • added value
  • sources of uncertainties
  • extreme events
  • monsoons
  • teleconnections
  • water balance
  • energy balance
  • convective permitting
  • cyclones (tropical, subtropical, and extratropical)
  • low level jets
  • marine heat waves
  • precipitation diurnal cycle
  • wind energy
  • solar energy
  • heat islands
  • seasonal forecast
  • climate change
  • fires
  • pollution
  • volcanic impacts on climate

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

26 pages, 20806 KiB  
Article
Non-Hydrostatic Regcm4 (Regcm4-NH): Evaluation of Precipitation Statistics at the Convection-Permitting Scale over Different Domains
by Paolo Stocchi, Emanuela Pichelli, Jose Abraham Torres Alavez, Erika Coppola, Graziano Giuliani and Filippo Giorgi
Atmosphere 2022, 13(6), 861; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos13060861 - 25 May 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2184
Abstract
Recent studies over different geographical regions of the world have proven that regional climate models at the convection-permitting scale (CPMs) improve the simulation of precipitation in many aspects, such as the diurnal cycle, precipitation frequency, intensity, and extremes at daily—but even more at [...] Read more.
Recent studies over different geographical regions of the world have proven that regional climate models at the convection-permitting scale (CPMs) improve the simulation of precipitation in many aspects, such as the diurnal cycle, precipitation frequency, intensity, and extremes at daily—but even more at hourly—time scales. Here, we present an evaluation of climate simulations with the newly developed RegCM4-NH model run at the convection-permitting scale (CP-RegCM4-NH) for a decade-long period, over three domains covering a large European area. The simulations use a horizontal grid spacing of ~3 km and are driven by the ERA-Interim reanalysis through an intermediate driving RegCM4-NH simulation at ~12 km grid spacing with parameterized deep convection. The km-scale simulations are evaluated against a suite of hourly observation datasets with high spatial resolutions and are compared to the coarse-resolution driving simulation in order to assess improvements in precipitation from the seasonal to hourly scale. The results show that CP-RegCM4-NH produces a more realistic representation of precipitation than the coarse-resolution simulation over all domains. The most significant improvements were found for intensity, heavy precipitation, and precipitation frequency, both on daily and hourly time scales in all seasons. In general, CP-RegCM4-NH tends to correctly produce more intense precipitation and to reduce the frequency of events compared to the coarse-resolution one. On the daily scale, improvements in CP simulations are highly region dependent, with the best results over Italy, France, and Germany, and the largest biases over Switzerland, the Carpathians, and Greece, especially during the summer seasons. At the hourly scale, the improvement in CP simulations for precipitation intensity and spatial distribution is clearer than at the daily timescale. In addition, the representation of extreme events is clearly improved by CP-RegCM4-NH, particularly at the hourly time scale, although an overestimation over some subregions can be found. Although biases between the model simulations at the km-scale and observations still exist, this first application of CP-RegCM4-NH at high spatial resolution indicates a clear benefit of convection-permitting simulations and encourages further assessments of the added value of km-scale model configurations for regional climate change projections. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Regional Climate Modelling)
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17 pages, 7834 KiB  
Article
Effects of Land Cover Changes on Compound Extremes over West Africa Using the Regional Climate Model RegCM4
by Moctar Camara, Ibrahima Diba and Arona Diedhiou
Atmosphere 2022, 13(3), 421; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos13030421 - 05 Mar 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1650
Abstract
This study aims to characterize the impacts of the Sahel–Sahara interface reforestation on compound extremes in the Sahel region during the West African monsoon season (June–July–August–September, JJAS). For this purpose, we performed a simulation with the standard version of the RegCM4 model, and [...] Read more.
This study aims to characterize the impacts of the Sahel–Sahara interface reforestation on compound extremes in the Sahel region during the West African monsoon season (June–July–August–September, JJAS). For this purpose, we performed a simulation with the standard version of the RegCM4 model, and another simulation with the altered version of the same model, taking into account the incorporated forest. Results show that reforestation may strongly influence the frequency of individual extreme events (dry and warm days) by decreasing them over and off the reforested zone. The reduction in these extreme dry and warm days may be due partly to the strengthening of the atmospheric moisture content over most parts of the West African domain and the weakening of the sensible heat flux south of 16° N. The analysis also shows an increase in extreme wet days over and off the reforested zone, which could be associated partly with the strengthening of evapotranspiration over most parts of the West African domain, including the reforested area. The analysis of compound extremes shows a strong occurrence of the compound dry/warm mode over the northern Sahel for both runs, probably due to the weak precipitation recorded in this zone. Both experiments also simulated a strong compound wet/warm mode occurrence over the Sahel due to a high rainfall occurrence over this region. When comparing both runs, the impact of the reforestation was to decrease (increase) the compound extreme dry/warm (wet/warm) mode over the reforested zone. The dry/warm mode decrease is consistent with that of individual extreme dry and warm days, while the compound wet/warm mode increase may be driven by that of the extreme wet days. Finally, when considering the seasonal cycle, the dry/warm mode exhibits a more substantial decrease in the beginning (June–July, JJ) than during the peak of the West African summer monsoon season (August–September, AS). Moreover, reforestation similarly affects the compound wet/warm mode in JJ and AS by increasing it in the reforested region and decreasing it over the Southern Sahel (south of 15° N). This work suggests that reforestation may be a good solution for West African policymakers to mitigate climate change over the region and to develop better strategies for water resource management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Regional Climate Modelling)
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