Special Issue "Wind Power Technologies"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Wenxian Yang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
Interests: wind power; offshore engineering; operation and maintenance

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will report the latest research achievements of professional scholars or experts who are working in the field of wind power. This Special Issue will cover, but is not limited to, the following topics:

  1. Design and dynamics of wind power systems
  2. Risk management and reliability analysis of wind power systems
  3. Operation and maintenance of wind power systems
  4. Design of wind farms
  5. Wind resource assessment
  6. Substation and energy storage technologies in wind farms
  7. The ecosystem in wind farms
  8. Big data and intelligent technologies for developing a smart wind farm

Dr. Wenxian Yang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Wind power
  • Dynamics
  • Reliability
  • Operation and maintenance
  • Energy storage
  • Wind farm

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Integrated Design of Aerodynamic Performance and Structural Characteristics for Medium Thickness Wind Turbine Airfoil
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(23), 5243; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9235243 - 02 Dec 2019
Abstract
The currently geometric and aerodynamic characteristics for wind turbine airfoils with the medium thickness are studied to pursue maximum aerodynamic performance, while the interaction between blade stiffness and aerodynamic performance is neglected. Combining the airfoil functional integration theory and the mathematical model of [...] Read more.
The currently geometric and aerodynamic characteristics for wind turbine airfoils with the medium thickness are studied to pursue maximum aerodynamic performance, while the interaction between blade stiffness and aerodynamic performance is neglected. Combining the airfoil functional integration theory and the mathematical model of the blade cross-section stiffness matrix, an integrated design method of aerodynamic performance and structural stiffness characteristics for the medium thickness airfoils is presented. The aerodynamic and structural comparison of the optimized WQ-A300 airfoil, WQ-B300 airfoil, and the classic DU97-W-300 airfoil were analyzed. The results show that the aerodynamic performance of the WQ-A300 and WQ-B300 airfoils are better than that of the DU97-W-300 airfoil. Though the aerodynamic performance of the WQ-B300 airfoil is slightly reduced compared to the WQ-A300 airfoil, its blade cross-sectional stiffness properties are improved as the flapwise and edgewise stiffness are increased by 6.2% and 8.4%, respectively. This study verifies the feasibility for the novel design method. Moreover, it also provides a good design idea for the wind turbine airfoils and blade structural properties with medium or large thickness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wind Power Technologies)
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Open AccessArticle
A Feasibility Study for Using Fishnet to Protect Offshore Wind Turbine Monopile Foundations from Damage by Scouring
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(23), 5023; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9235023 - 21 Nov 2019
Abstract
Offshore wind turbine monopile foundations are subjected to complex wind, wave, and flow coupling effects, which result in seabed scouring around the monopile. The consequent scour pits threaten the reliability, safety, and load-carrying capacity of the monopile. In order to develop a cost-effective [...] Read more.
Offshore wind turbine monopile foundations are subjected to complex wind, wave, and flow coupling effects, which result in seabed scouring around the monopile. The consequent scour pits threaten the reliability, safety, and load-carrying capacity of the monopile. In order to develop a cost-effective measure to mitigate such an issue, a new countermeasure device, named “fishnet”, is studied in this paper using a combined approach of numerical simulations and experimental tests. In the research, the size of the fishnet, diameter of the fishnet thread, and the installation height of the fishnet were optimized in order to achieve the best protection to the monopile foundation. In the paper, both numerical simulations and laboratory tests proved the effectiveness of the proposed “fishnet” in reducing the scour around the wind turbine monopile foundations. Moreover, its contribution to erosion reduction can be further enhanced via optimization. It was found that, after optimization, the maximum shear force on the seabed could be reduced by 14% in the numerical study, and the maximum depth of the scour pit could be reduced by 38.2% in laboratory tests. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wind Power Technologies)
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