Special Issue "Laser Interaction with Plasmonic Nanostructures"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Optics and Lasers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Andrés Guerrero-Martínez
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Guest Editor
Departamento de Química Física, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: nanoplasmonics; colloid chemistry; supramolecular chemistry; spectroscopy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Ovidio Peña-Rodríguez
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Instituto de Fusión Nuclear, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid E-28006, Spain

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plasmonics is the branch of science that deals with the interaction between the electromagnetic field and the free electrons in a metal, as well as their potential applications. In nanostructured metals this interaction produces the localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR), which can be defined as the collective oscillation of conduction electrons in resonance with the incoming light. The LSPR can be tuned by changing parameters, such as the size, shape, and composition of the nanoparticles, but also the nature of the excitation source. For instance, under laser irradiation, the nanostructures act as nanolenses, inducing electromagnetic field enhancements in their surroundings that are several orders of magnitude larger than that of the incident field. We focus this Special Issue on the effects of this interaction that open new perspectives for designing novel devices and applications in a wide variety of fields. For instance, the combination of a continuous wave laser with plasmonic nanoparticles, as enhancement platforms, can be used either for efficient photothermal destruction of cancer cells, avoiding damage to tissues, or to perform surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopies, a powerful analytic tool capable of single molecule detection. Likewise, pulsed lasers have been used to study the mechanisms of surface plasmon dynamics in metal nanoparticles but also to synthesize (laser ablation) or modify them. All the topics related to the interaction of lasers with plasmonic nanostructures, including, but not restricted to, the previous examples, are invited to this Special Issue.

Dr. Andrés Guerrero-Martínez
Dr. Ovidio Peña-Rodríguez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Plasmonics

  • metal nanostructures

  • continuous wave laser

  • pulse laser

  • SERS

  • laser ablation

  • plasmonic photothermal therapy

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
Plasmon Modulation Spectroscopy of Noble Metals to Reveal the Distribution of the Fermi Surface Electrons in the Conduction Band
Appl. Sci. 2017, 7(12), 1315; https://doi.org/10.3390/app7121315 - 18 Dec 2017
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2206
Abstract
To directly access the dynamics of electron distribution near the Fermi-surface after plasmon excitation, pump-probe spectroscopy was performed by pumping plasmons on noble-metal films and probing the interband transition. Spectral change in the interband transitions is sensitive to the electron distribution near the [...] Read more.
To directly access the dynamics of electron distribution near the Fermi-surface after plasmon excitation, pump-probe spectroscopy was performed by pumping plasmons on noble-metal films and probing the interband transition. Spectral change in the interband transitions is sensitive to the electron distribution near the Fermi-surface, because it involves the d valence-band to the conduction band transitions and should reflect the k-space distribution dynamics of electrons. For the continuous-wave pump and probe experiment, the plasmon modulation spectra are found to differ from both the current modulation and temperature difference spectra, possibly reflecting signatures of the plasmon wave function. For the femtosecond-pulse pump and probe experiment, the transient spectra agree well with the known spectra upon the excitation of the respective electrons resulting from plasmon relaxation, probably because the lifetime of plasmons is shorter than the pulse duration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Interaction with Plasmonic Nanostructures)
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Article
Pt-Based Nanostructures for Observing Genuine SERS Spectra of p-Aminothiophenol (PATP) Molecules
Appl. Sci. 2017, 7(9), 953; https://doi.org/10.3390/app7090953 - 15 Sep 2017
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2013
Abstract
By one-pot wet chemical method, Pt-based hollow nanostructures were synthesized at room temperature. Because of the highly damping optical response of the metal, these Pt-based hollow nanostructures exhibited weak thermal effects with a laser focal spot on 4-aminothiophenol (PATP) molecules limiting dimerisation. The [...] Read more.
By one-pot wet chemical method, Pt-based hollow nanostructures were synthesized at room temperature. Because of the highly damping optical response of the metal, these Pt-based hollow nanostructures exhibited weak thermal effects with a laser focal spot on 4-aminothiophenol (PATP) molecules limiting dimerisation. The isolated surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of PATP, in which the vibrational bands from 4,4′-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) molecules are not observed, were able to be seen, and this was in good agreement with the Raman spectra of PATP powder. In addition, the concentration of PATP molecules was varied, and the illumination time was increased to 2000 s, respectively. It was found that spectra were stable with varied PATP concentrations, and the plasmon-driven chemical conversion of PATP to DMAB was still suppressed, even when the laser illumination time was increased to 2000 s. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Interaction with Plasmonic Nanostructures)
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Article
Ion-Mediated Aggregation of Gold Nanoparticles for Light-Induced Heating
Appl. Sci. 2017, 7(9), 916; https://doi.org/10.3390/app7090916 - 07 Sep 2017
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3073
Abstract
Photothermal therapy is proposed as a straightforward manner of killing cancer cells, which a plasmon field of gold nanoparticles is activated by incoming light resonance leading to a local increase of temperature. This photothermal effect is strongly dependent on the plasmonic features of [...] Read more.
Photothermal therapy is proposed as a straightforward manner of killing cancer cells, which a plasmon field of gold nanoparticles is activated by incoming light resonance leading to a local increase of temperature. This photothermal effect is strongly dependent on the plasmonic features of the nanoparticles. Herein, we study the effect of the ion-mediated aggregation of citrate-capped small spherical gold nanoparticles on the plasmonic band and the photothermal performance. An intermediate value of ionic strength has been found to be optimum with respect to the photothermal capabilities of the gold nanoparticles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Interaction with Plasmonic Nanostructures)
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Article
Size Characterisation Method and Detection Enhancement of Plasmonic Nanoparticles in a Pump–Probe System
Appl. Sci. 2017, 7(8), 819; https://doi.org/10.3390/app7080819 - 10 Aug 2017
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2033
Abstract
The optical resonance of metal nanoparticles can be used to enhance the generation and detection of their main vibrational mode. In this work, we show that this method allows the accurate characterisation of the particle’s size because the vibrational frequency of plasmonic nanoparticles [...] Read more.
The optical resonance of metal nanoparticles can be used to enhance the generation and detection of their main vibrational mode. In this work, we show that this method allows the accurate characterisation of the particle’s size because the vibrational frequency of plasmonic nanoparticles only depends on their mechanical properties. Moreover, by a careful selection of the particle size and/or probe laser wavelength, the detected signal can be increased by a large factor (∼9 for the particles used in this work) under the same illumination conditions. Finally, we show experimentally that particles of different sizes inside the point spread function can be observed due to the differences in their vibrational states, which could provide a feasible route to super-resolution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Interaction with Plasmonic Nanostructures)
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Article
Effect of Organic Stabilizers on Silver Nanoparticles Fabricated by Femtosecond Pulsed Laser Ablation
Appl. Sci. 2017, 7(8), 793; https://doi.org/10.3390/app7080793 - 04 Aug 2017
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2543
Abstract
Laser ablation has several advantages over the chemical synthesis of nanoparticles due to its simplicity and because it is a faster and cleaner process. In this paper, we use femtosecond laser ablation to generate highly concentrated silver colloidal nanoparticle solutions. Those high concentrations [...] Read more.
Laser ablation has several advantages over the chemical synthesis of nanoparticles due to its simplicity and because it is a faster and cleaner process. In this paper, we use femtosecond laser ablation to generate highly concentrated silver colloidal nanoparticle solutions. Those high concentrations usually lead to agglomeration of the nanoparticles, rendering the solution nearly useless. We employ two different organic stabilizers (hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB, and polyvinylpyrrolidone, PVP) to avoid this problem and study their effect on the nanoparticle size distribution, structural characteristics, and the solution concentration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Interaction with Plasmonic Nanostructures)
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