Special Issue "Optical Sensors and Gauges Based on Plasmonic Resonance"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Optics and Lasers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 March 2022) | Viewed by 6795

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Francisco Pérez-Ocón
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Optics, University of Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain
Interests: optical sensing; SPR sensors and gauges

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plasmonic sensors are the object of continuous, dynamic, fundamental, and applied research today.

Every day, sensors based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) are used more and more in a great variety of new applications and developments, for instance, in engineering, physics, chemistry, biotechnology, environment, medicine, etc. They have been shown to have a high sensitivity and resolution and to be able to integrate easily since they are in the dimensions of nano-optics.

In this Special Issue, both theoretical and experimental research will be considered, provided they offer new knowledge or substantial improvements in the field of SPR. In more detail, articles should describe new detection techniques or substantial improvements over an existing one or a major new application of an existing method. All types of plasmonic sensors will be considered in applications (physical sensors, chemical sensors, biological sensors, environmental sensors, etc.), sensor elements (new materials, new combinations of materials, dopants, new structures, etc.), plasmonic structures, functionalization protocols for metallic surfaces, or any other innovation in the field of plasmonic sensors. Due to the pandemic and the rapid proliferation of COVID-19, research on SPR sensors related to the detection of SARS-CoV-2 will also be considered.

An essential factor in terms of acceptance of a submitted manuscript will be the innovation it brings, as well as its potential for practical applications.

I encourage you to contribute to this Special Issue through research, design, development, and applications outlined in articles that demonstrate the most recent advances in plasmonic sensors with new scientific knowledge, designs, and their practical applications.

Prof. Dr. Francisco Pérez-Ocón
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • surface plasmon resonance
  • localized surface plasmon
  • SPR sensor
  • novel applications of plasmonic sensors

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Article
Tunable Plasmonic Resonance Sensor Using a Metamaterial Film in a D-Shaped Photonic Crystal Fiber for Refractive Index Measurements
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(4), 2153; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12042153 - 18 Feb 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1309
Abstract
Subwavelength cells of metallic nanorods arrayed in a dielectric background, termed “metamaterials”, present bulk properties that are useful to control and manipulate surface plasmon resonances. Such feature finds tremendous potential in providing a broad manifold of applications for plasmonic optical sensors. In this [...] Read more.
Subwavelength cells of metallic nanorods arrayed in a dielectric background, termed “metamaterials”, present bulk properties that are useful to control and manipulate surface plasmon resonances. Such feature finds tremendous potential in providing a broad manifold of applications for plasmonic optical sensors. In this paper, we propose a surface-plasmon-resonance-based sensor with spectral response tunable by the volume fraction of silver present in a metamaterial layer deposited on a D-shaped photonic crystal fiber. Using computational simulations, we show that sensitivity and resolution can be hugely altered by changing the amount of constituents in the metamaterial, with no further modifications in the structure of the sensor. Moreover, the designed sensor can also be applied to label the average volume fraction of silver in the metamaterial layer and then to estimate its effective constitutive parameters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Sensors and Gauges Based on Plasmonic Resonance)
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Article
Sensors for Continuous Measuring of Sucrose Solutions Using Surface Plasmon Resonance
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(3), 1350; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12031350 - 27 Jan 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 351
Abstract
We propose two new sensors based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and optical fibers to determine the concentration of sucrose in products such as beverages, honey, condensed milk, etc., in real-time during the fabrication process or when the product has been manufactured. The [...] Read more.
We propose two new sensors based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and optical fibers to determine the concentration of sucrose in products such as beverages, honey, condensed milk, etc., in real-time during the fabrication process or when the product has been manufactured. The sensors have been made with a hemispherical prism, a layer of MgF2, and another of Ag or Al with the Kretschmann configuration, and they are modulated in intensity. We have optimized these sensors from the modeling of reflectance curves. We have carried out a numerical simulation with these sensors to show how they can detect small changes in the refractive index depending on the concentration of sucrose where the device is immersed. The maximum sensitivity of the sensors is 11.9 RIU−1 and 5.7 RIU−1, the resolutions 1.7 × 10−4 RIU and 7.9 × 10−4 RIU, and the detection limits between 0-78Brix. Moreover, the sensors have an alarm system that is triggered when the sucrose concentration is insufficient or excessive. Data can also be sent in real-time to a remote place. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Sensors and Gauges Based on Plasmonic Resonance)
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Article
A Novel Dual-Wavelength Method for Evaluating Temperature Effect in Fiber-Optic SPR Sensors
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(19), 9011; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11199011 - 28 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 648
Abstract
The temperature effect is one of the critical factors to induce the resonance wavelength shift in fiber-optic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors, which leads to the inaccuracy measurement of refractive index (RI) in practical applications. In this study, a novel dual-wavelength method is [...] Read more.
The temperature effect is one of the critical factors to induce the resonance wavelength shift in fiber-optic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors, which leads to the inaccuracy measurement of refractive index (RI) in practical applications. In this study, a novel dual-wavelength method is presented for fiber-optic SPR sensors to measure the changes of RI and temperature simultaneously in real time. A typical model of an SPR-based fiber optical sensor is constructed for theoretical analysis of temperature effect. Both the thermo-optic effect in the fiber core and phonon–electron scattering along with electron–electron scattering in the metal layer are studied systematically in the theoretical model. The linear and independent relationship, about the dependence of defined output signals on the RI and temperature, is validated by a theoretical calculation in specific dual wavelengths. A proof-of-concept experiment is conducted to demonstrate the capability of the presented dual-wavelength technique. The experimental results indicate that the presented dual-wavelength method is technically feasible and can be applied for practical application. Since the presented method only depends on the full advantages of the transfer spectrum data, it can be applied directly to the conventional single-channel fiber-optic SPR without any specific design structure of the sensor probe. The proposed method provides a new way to detect the RI under different thermal conditions and could lead to a better design for the fiber-optic SPR sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Sensors and Gauges Based on Plasmonic Resonance)
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Article
Application of SPRi Biosensors for Determination of 20S Proteasome and UCH-L1 Levels in the Serum and Urine of Transitional Bladder Cancer Patients
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(17), 7835; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11177835 - 25 Aug 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 595
Abstract
The ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS) participates in the degradation of proteins which play an important role in regulating the cell cycle, apoptosis, and angiogenesis, as well as in the immune system. These processes are important in carcinogenesis. Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is one of [...] Read more.
The ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS) participates in the degradation of proteins which play an important role in regulating the cell cycle, apoptosis, and angiogenesis, as well as in the immune system. These processes are important in carcinogenesis. Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is one of the predominant types of bladder cancer. The relationship between the ubiquitin–proteasome system and cancer progression has become a topic of increasing interest among researchers. In this work, we propose an application of surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi)-based biosensors for the detection of 20S proteasome and ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) in the blood serum and urine of patients with TCC. The aim of the study was to determine 20S proteasome and UCH-L1 concentrations and to correlate the results with clinicopathological parameters. The group of subjects consisted of 82 patients with confirmed TCC, in addition to a control group of 27 healthy volunteers. It was found that 20S proteasome and UCH-L1 concentrations were significantly elevated in both the serum and urine of TCC patients, compared with the healthy subjects. There was a correlation between 20S proteasome concentrations in serum and urine, as well as between serum proteasome and UCH-L1 concentration. The SPRi biosensor sensitive to 20S proteasome using PSI inhibitor as the receptor, and the SPRi biosensor sensitive to the UCH-L1 protein using the protein-specific antibody as the receptor is suitable for the determination of 20S proteasome and UCH-L1 in body fluids and can serve as useful tools in the investigation of cancer biomarkers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Sensors and Gauges Based on Plasmonic Resonance)
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Article
Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor of CO2 for Indoors and Outdoors
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(15), 6869; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11156869 - 26 Jul 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 690
Abstract
The ability to detect CO2 with the smallest possible devices, equipped with alarms and having great precision, is vital for human life, whether indoors or outdoors. It is essential to know if we are being subjected to this gas to establish the [...] Read more.
The ability to detect CO2 with the smallest possible devices, equipped with alarms and having great precision, is vital for human life, whether indoors or outdoors. It is essential to know if we are being subjected to this gas to establish the level of ventilation in factories, houses, classrooms, etc., and to be protected against viruses or dangerous gas concentrations. Equally, when we are in the countryside, it is useful to be able to evaluate if the greenhouse effect, caused by this gas, is increasing. We propose a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor for the measurement of CO2 concentrations taking into account that the refractive index of carbon dioxide depends on temperature, humidity, pressure, etc. With our sensor we can measure (in air) in any type of environment and concentration. Our sensor has a resolution of 5.15 × 10−5 RIU and a sensitivity of 19.4 RIU−1 for 400 ppm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Sensors and Gauges Based on Plasmonic Resonance)
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Review

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Review
Recent Developments in Plasmonic Sensors of Phenol and Its Derivatives
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(22), 10519; https://doi.org/10.3390/app112210519 - 09 Nov 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 665
Abstract
Many scientists are increasingly interested in on-site detection methods of phenol and its derivatives because these substances have been universally used as a significant raw material in the industrial manufacturing of various chemicals of antimicrobials, anti-inflammatory drugs, antioxidants, and so on. The contamination [...] Read more.
Many scientists are increasingly interested in on-site detection methods of phenol and its derivatives because these substances have been universally used as a significant raw material in the industrial manufacturing of various chemicals of antimicrobials, anti-inflammatory drugs, antioxidants, and so on. The contamination of phenolic compounds in the natural environment is a toxic response that induces harsh impacts on plants, animals, and human health. This mini-review updates recent developments and trends of novel plasmonic resonance nanomaterials, which are assisted by various optical sensors, including colorimetric, fluorescence, localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), and plasmon-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. These advanced and powerful analytical tools exhibit potential application for ultrahigh sensitivity, selectivity, and rapid detection of phenol and its derivatives. In this report, we mainly emphasize the recent progress and novel trends in the optical sensors of phenolic compounds. The applications of Raman technologies based on pure noble metals, hybrid nanomaterials, and metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are presented, in which the remaining establishments and challenges are discussed and summarized to inspire the future improvement of scientific optical sensors into easy-to-operate effective platforms for the rapid and trace detection of phenol and its derivatives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Sensors and Gauges Based on Plasmonic Resonance)
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Review
Gas Sensors Based on Localized Surface Plasmon Resonances: Synthesis of Oxide Films with Embedded Metal Nanoparticles, Theory and Simulation, and Sensitivity Enhancement Strategies
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(12), 5388; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11125388 - 10 Jun 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1479
Abstract
This work presents a comprehensive review on gas sensors based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) phenomenon, including the theory of LSPR, the synthesis of nanoparticle-embedded oxide thin films, and strategies to enhance the sensitivity of these optical sensors, supported by simulations of [...] Read more.
This work presents a comprehensive review on gas sensors based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) phenomenon, including the theory of LSPR, the synthesis of nanoparticle-embedded oxide thin films, and strategies to enhance the sensitivity of these optical sensors, supported by simulations of the electromagnetic properties. The LSPR phenomenon is known to be responsible for the unique colour effects observed in the ancient Roman Lycurgus Cup and at the windows of the medieval cathedrals. In both cases, the optical effects result from the interaction of the visible light (scattering and absorption) with the conduction band electrons of noble metal nanoparticles (gold, silver, and gold–silver alloys). These nanoparticles are dispersed in a dielectric matrix with a relatively high refractive index in order to push the resonance to the visible spectral range. At the same time, they have to be located at the surface to make LSPR sensitive to changes in the local dielectric environment, the property that is very attractive for sensing applications. Hence, an overview of gas sensors is presented, including electronic-nose systems, followed by a description of the surface plasmons that arise in noble metal thin films and nanoparticles. Afterwards, metal oxides are explored as robust and sensitive materials to host nanoparticles, followed by preparation methods of nanocomposite plasmonic thin films with sustainable techniques. Finally, several optical properties simulation methods are described, and the optical LSPR sensitivity of gold nanoparticles with different shapes, sensing volumes, and surroundings is calculated using the discrete dipole approximation method. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Sensors and Gauges Based on Plasmonic Resonance)
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