Special Issue "Innovation within Micro- and Nanotechnologies"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanotechnology and Applied Nanosciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Per Ohlckers
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of South-Eastern Norway, Raveien 215, No-3199 Horten, Norway
Interests: micro- and nanotechnologies; microsystems; microelectromechanical systems (mems); silicon sensor technologies; semiconductor sensor technologies; optoelectronic sensor technologies; packaging & interconnection technologies for micro- and nanotechnologies
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanotechnology can be defined as consisting of “the processing of, separation, consolidation, and deformation of materials by one atom or by one molecule”, while microtechnology can be defined as “the art of creating, manufacturing or using miniature components, equipment and systems that have been mass produced. The first and foremost feature in this field is its multidisciplinary nature, as microtechnology systems use electronic, computerized, chemical, mechanical and optical elements as well as various other materials. The products of microtechnology are mainly microsystems and microsystem components”. When combined, we may say that “micro- and nanotechnologies (MNT) includes both microtechnology and nanotechnology, as well as a combination of both technologies to create and integrate structures, devices and systems that have novel properties and functions because of their small and/or intermediate size”. The impact power of MNT can be best visualized by the famous quote by Robert Feynman in his Nobel lecture in 1958: “There is plenty of room at the bottom”. The field has steadily grown in importance, and is now a key enabling field for many industries, enabling steadily increasing performance at steadily lower cost in many products ranging from professional high-end applications to low-cost consumer applications. Research activities have also progressed steadily to support innovation in MNT. Important application areas include pharmaceutics (e.g., engineered medical drugs, microfluidics), biomedical technology (e.g., pacemakers, artificial organs, etc.), microsensors (e.g., automotive, industrial, aerospace, consumer (mobile phones, smart watches, etc.)), microactuators (e.g., microvalves in Lab-on-a-Chip for biomedical diagnostics), micro-optics (e.g., lasers, LEDs, camera chips, etc.) nanomaterials (e.g., paint additives, antibacterial refrigerator coatings, catalytics in microchemistry, etc.). Worldwide, excellent research activities in MNT are steadily contributing to the progress in the state-of-the-art, and this Special Issue will highlight work of excellence in the field.

Prof. Per Ohlckers
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanotechnology
  • microtechnology
  • microsensors
  • microactuators
  • microsystems
  • microchemistry
  • pharmaceutics
  • biomedical technology
  • nanomaterials

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Tailorable and Broadband On-Chip Optical Power Splitter
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(20), 4239; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9204239 - 10 Oct 2019
Abstract
An on-chip optical power splitter is a key component of photonic signal processing and quantum integrated circuits and requires compactness, wideband, low insertion loss, and variable splitting ratio. However, designing an on-chip splitter with both customizable splitting ratio and wavelength independence is a [...] Read more.
An on-chip optical power splitter is a key component of photonic signal processing and quantum integrated circuits and requires compactness, wideband, low insertion loss, and variable splitting ratio. However, designing an on-chip splitter with both customizable splitting ratio and wavelength independence is a big challenge. Here, we propose a tailorable and broadband optical power splitter over 100 nm with low insertion loss less than 0.3%, as well as a compact footprint, based on 1×2 interleaved tapered waveguides. The proposed scheme can design the output power ratio of transverse electric modes, lithographically, and a selection equation of a power splitting ratio is extracted to obtain the desired power ratio. Our splitter scheme is close to an impeccable on-chip optical power splitter for classical and quantum integrated photonic circuits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation within Micro- and Nanotechnologies)
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