Special Issue "Endophytic Entomopathogenic Fungi: New approach for controlling serious pests"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Spiridon Mantzoukas
Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Patras, Greece
2. Department of Agricultural Technology, University of Ioannina, Arta, Greece
Interests: entomopathogenic fungi; endophytes; IPM; tritrophic interactions; stored product pests
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Panagiotis A. Eliopoulos
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agriculture and Agricultural Technology, University of Thessaly, 41110 Larissa, Greece
Interests: biological control of crop pests; IPM methods; insect–plant interactions; stored product pests; precision agriculture methods in crop protection
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Endophytes are microorganisms that spend at least part of their lives in a non-parasitic association with plants. There is accumulated evidence that many entomopathogenic fungi go through an endophytic phase in several plant species. Usually, this endophytic relationship reinforces plants with insecticidal or insect repellent traits, a characteristic that could be exploited for designing environmentally friendly applications for insect control in agriculture. Fungal entomopathogens such as Beauveria bassiana Balsamo (Vuillemin) (Hypocreales: Cordycipitaceae), Metarhizium anisopliae (Metchnikoff) Sorokin (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) and Isaria fumosorosea (Wize) Brown and Smith (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) play an important role in the regulation of insect populations. The use of entomopathogenic endophytes has been proposed as a promising alternative to chemical insecticides and transgenic plants. Moreover, the symbiosis of endophytes with the host plant is generally asymptomatic and alters the plant’s responses to environmental conditions.

Dr. Spiridon Mantzoukas
Prof. Dr. Panagiotis Eliopoulos
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • entomopathogenic fungi
  • endophytes
  • IPM
  • tritrophic interactions
  • beauveria
  • metarhizium
  • isaria

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Endophytic Colonization of Pepper (Capsicum annum) Controls Aphids (Myzus persicae Sulzer)
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(11), 2239; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9112239 - 30 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Aphids are among the most harmful crop pests, damaging plants by sucking sap or by transmitting pathogenic viruses. Plant infestation by aphids depends on their population growth. Entomopathogenic fungi are essential participants of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, regulating arthropod communities. Many fungal species [...] Read more.
Aphids are among the most harmful crop pests, damaging plants by sucking sap or by transmitting pathogenic viruses. Plant infestation by aphids depends on their population growth. Entomopathogenic fungi are essential participants of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, regulating arthropod communities. Many fungal species with a symbiotic–endophytic relation with plants are pathogenic, producing insecticides or insect repellents. The present study investigated the effects of the fungal entomopathogens Beauveria bassiana, Metarhizium anisopliae and Isaria fumosorosea, following their endophytic colonization of the sweet pepper Capsicum annum, on the development of the green peach aphid Myzus persicae. After 21 days, B. bassiana produced 100% aphid mortality, M. anisopliae 90% and I. fumosorosea 83.3%. There were also significant differences in terms of the effect on aphid population in planta and on the survival time of young adults in planta. External mycelium appeared within 96 h after placing aphid cadavers on damp filter paper. PCR confirmed that the mycelium was of B. bassiana, M. anisopliae and I. fumosorosea. DNA sequences collected from this work were matched with existing sequences data in GenBank, using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool. Our results showed that none of the three fungal isolates had an effect in promoting or suppressing the growth of C. annum. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Endophytic Entomopathogenic Fungi: A Valuable Biological Control Tool against Plant Pests
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(1), 360; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10010360 - 03 Jan 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Among the non-chemical insect control methods, biological control is one of the most effective human and environmentally friendly alternatives. One of the main biological control methods is the application of entomopathogenic fungi (EPF). Today, biological crop protection with EPF plays a key role [...] Read more.
Among the non-chemical insect control methods, biological control is one of the most effective human and environmentally friendly alternatives. One of the main biological control methods is the application of entomopathogenic fungi (EPF). Today, biological crop protection with EPF plays a key role in projects for the sustainable management of insect pests. EPF have several advantages over conventional insecticides, including cost-effectiveness, high yield, absence of harmful side-effects for beneficial organisms, fewer chemical residues in the environment and increased biodiversity in ecosystems. Apart from direct application as contact bioinsecticides, EPF are able to colonize plants as endophytes acting not only as pest and disease control agents but also as plant growth promoters. The present paper presents an outline of the biocontrol potential of several EPF, which could be harnessed for the development of new integrated pest Management (IPM) strategies. Emphasis is given on benefits of endophytic EPF, on issues for practical application and in fields in need of further research. Our findings are discussed in the context of highlighting the value of entomopathogenic fungal endophytes as an integral part of pest management programs for the optimization of crop production. Full article
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