Special Issue "District Energy Network for Sustainable Urban Development"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Behzad Rismanchi
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Infrastructure Engineering, Melbourne School of Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Parkville VIC 3052, Australia
Interests: thermal energy storage; energy management; renewable energy; energy saving

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is very unlikely that yesterday’s technology could address future demand for energy. A smarter solution is required that can tackle the three top pillars of energy trilemma— security, affordability, and sustainability—all at the same time. If the solution focuses on just one dimension in isolation, it is unlikely to be able to address the sustainable urban development. The district energy network (DEN), which is capable of providing required energy either in the form of electricity, heating or cooling that utilizes available local energy/waste resources, might be one of the best solutions to this dilemma. The integrated thermal energy storage (TES) system would ensure secure and stable access to energy continuously. This Special Issue aims to provide an opportunity for researchers to publish their theoretical, analytical, and technological findings in the field of district energy networks with a holistic view over the lifecycle of the energy systems.

Dr. Behzad Rismanchi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • district energy network (DEN)
  • 5th-generation DHC
  • embodied energy of district energy systems
  • thermal energy storage
  • shallow geothermal energy
  • energy piles
  • precinct energy modeling

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Exploring the Impact of a District Sharing Strategy on Application Capacity and Carbon Emissions for Heating and Cooling with GSHP Systems
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(16), 5543; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10165543 - 11 Aug 2020
Abstract
To meet long-term climate change targets, the way that heating and cooling are generated and distributed has to be changed to achieve a supply of affordable, secure and low-carbon energy for all buildings and infrastructures. Among the possible renewable sources of energy, ground [...] Read more.
To meet long-term climate change targets, the way that heating and cooling are generated and distributed has to be changed to achieve a supply of affordable, secure and low-carbon energy for all buildings and infrastructures. Among the possible renewable sources of energy, ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems can be an effective low-carbon solution that is compatible with district heating and cooling in urban areas. There are no location restrictions for this technology, and underground energy sources are stable for long-term use. According to a previous study, buildings in urban areas have demonstrated significant spatial heterogeneity in terms of their capacity to demand (C/D) ratio under the application of GSHP due to variations in heating demand and available space. If a spatial sharing strategy can be developed to allow the surplus geothermal capacity to be shared with neighbors, the heating and cooling demands of a greater number of buildings in an area can be satisfied, thus achieving a city with lower carbon emissions. In this study, a GSHP district system model was developed with a specific embedding sharing strategy for the application of GSHP. Two sharing strategies were proposed in this study: (i) Strategy 1 involved individual systems with borehole sharing, and (ii) Strategy 2 was a central district system. Three districts in London were selected to compare the performance of the developed models on the C/D ratio, required borehole number and carbon emissions. According to the comparison analysis, both strategies were able to enhance the GSHP application capacity and increase the savings of carbon emissions. However, the improvement levels were shown to be different. A greater number of building types and a higher variety in building types with larger differentiation in heating and cooling demands can contribute to a better district sharing performance. In addition, it was found that these two sharing strategies were applicable to different kinds of districts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue District Energy Network for Sustainable Urban Development)
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Open AccessArticle
Renewable Energy Sources in a Post-Socialist Transitional Environment: The Influence of Social Geographic Factors on Potential Utilization of Very Shallow Geothermal Energy within Heating Systems in Small Serbian Town of Ub
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(8), 2739; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10082739 - 15 Apr 2020
Abstract
Energetic stability is a precondition for a regular functioning of society and economy. Actual climate change raised the awareness of population and policy makers about the importance of exploited energy sources. Renewable energy sources are revealed as the solution which should satisfy both [...] Read more.
Energetic stability is a precondition for a regular functioning of society and economy. Actual climate change raised the awareness of population and policy makers about the importance of exploited energy sources. Renewable energy sources are revealed as the solution which should satisfy both needs—a need for energetic stability, as well as a need for producing ‘clean’ and ‘sustainable’ energy, and therefore reduce humans’ influence on the climate change. Very shallow geothermal energy offers wide range for utilization, among others for heating and cooling living spaces. This article shows potentials of low temperature heating system networks in a small Serbian town of Ub. In addition to technical possibilities, this article combines geographical and social, as well as political and economic circumstances in the town of Ub, which emerge as a result of a complex (post-socialist) transitional vortex. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue District Energy Network for Sustainable Urban Development)
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