Special Issue "Physical and Mechanical Characteristics of Soils and Rocks in Cold Regions"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental and Sustainable Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Dongwook Kim
Website
Guest Editor
Incheon National University, Incheon, South Korea
Interests: rock and soil temperature estimation modeling in cold regions; foundations in cold regions; organic soils; freeze–thaw effects on rocks and soils; soil compaction under freezing temperature; consolidation of highly compressive soils; reliability analysis of geotechnical structures in cold regions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Special Issue of “Physical and Mechanical Characteristics of Soils and Rocks in Cold Regions” covers a wide range of research related to the soil and rock properties of cold regions. Soils and rocks in cold regions are exposed to extreme environmental conditions, including severe wind, cold temperatures with high variability, solar radiation, and others. Physical changes of soils and rocks during freeze–thawing environments influence the development landscapes, the formation of soil, and the preservation of structures. In addition, close investigation of the changes of soils and rocks cold regions indirectly provides evidence of changes in the long-term global climate. The possible topics of this Special Issue include:

  • Engineering properties of soils in cold regions—organic matter, mineral composition, consolidation;
  • Geotechnical construction in cold regions including soil compaction, mechanical treatment of organic matters, remediation;
  • Environmental effect on soils and rocks—freeze–thaw cycles, rock frost weathering, frost-driven rock fracture;
  • Development of theoretical models of soil and rock temperature estimation.

The deadline for submissions is 31 August 2021.

Dr. Dongwook Kim
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • engineering property
  • environmental effect
  • freeze–thaw weathering
  • geotechnical remediation
  • theoretical estimation models of soil and rock properties

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Microscopic Characteristic Analysis on Sandstone under Coupling Effect of Freeze–Thaw and Acidic Treatment: From Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Perspective
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(16), 5699; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10165699 - 17 Aug 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Microscopic characteristics greatly affect mechanical and physical properties as they exert vital impact on the stability and durability of materials. In this paper, widely distributed sandstone was chosen as the research object. Sandstone was treated with a coupled effect of Freeze–Thaw (F–T) weathering [...] Read more.
Microscopic characteristics greatly affect mechanical and physical properties as they exert vital impact on the stability and durability of materials. In this paper, widely distributed sandstone was chosen as the research object. Sandstone was treated with a coupled effect of Freeze–Thaw (F–T) weathering and acid solution, where freeze–thaw cycles were set as 0, 10, 20, 30 and 40 cycles, and the pH of the acid solution were set as 2.8, 4.2, 5.6 and 7.0, respectively. Then, nuclear magnetic resonance was applied to measure the microscopic characteristics of sandstone, then porosity, pore size distribution and permeability before the fractal dimensions were obtained and calculated. Results show that porosity increases when F–T cycles increase, and its increase grows with the pH of acid solution decrease during the first 10 F–T cycles. Macro porosity, meso porosity and micro porosity account for the largest, second largest and smallest ratio of porosity growth. Meso porosity, micro porosity and macro porosity account for the largest, second largest and smallest ratio of total porosity. Permeability increases obviously with F–T cycle increase, while acid erosion exerts little influence on permeability increment overall. Fractal dimensions of meso pores and macro pores increase with F–T cycle increase overall, and they increase with pH decrease overall. Porosity has strong exponentially correlation with permeability. Fractal dimensions of meso pores and macro pores have good linearly correlation with permeability, while correlation between porosity and fractal dimensions are not that obvious. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Dynamic Characteristics of Sandstone under Coupled Static-Dynamic Loads after Freeze-Thaw Cycles
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(10), 3351; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10103351 - 12 May 2020
Abstract
The effect of temperature fluctuation on rocks needs to be considered in many civil engineering applications. Up to date the dynamic characteristics of rock under freeze-thaw cycles are still not quite clearly understood. In this study, the dynamic mechanical properties of sandstone under [...] Read more.
The effect of temperature fluctuation on rocks needs to be considered in many civil engineering applications. Up to date the dynamic characteristics of rock under freeze-thaw cycles are still not quite clearly understood. In this study, the dynamic mechanical properties of sandstone under pre-compression stress and freeze-thaw cycles were investigated. At the same number of freeze-thaw cycles, with increasing axial pre-compression stress, the dynamic Young’s modulus and peak stress first increase and then decrease, whereas the dynamic peak strain first decreases and then increases. At the same pre-compression stress, with increasing number of freeze-thaw cycles, the peak stress decreases while the peak strain increases, and the peak strain and peak stress show an inverse correlation before or after the pre-compression stress reaches the densification load of the static stress–strain curve. The peak stress and strain both increase under the static load near the yielding stage threshold of the static stress–strain curve. The failure mode is mainly shear failure, and with increasing axial pre-compression stress, the degree of shear failure increases, the energy absorption rate of the specimen increases first and then decreases. With increasing number of freeze-thaw cycles, the number of fragments increases and the size diminishes, and the energy absorption rates of the sandstone increase. Full article
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