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Joint Kinematics Analysis and Injuries Recovery

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 July 2023) | Viewed by 6255

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
CIPER, Faculdade de Motricidade Humana, Universidade de Lisboa, Estrada da Costa, Cruz-Quebrada-Dafundo, 1499-002 Oeiras, Portugal
Interests: biomechanics; musculoskeletal modeling; gait analysis; cerebral palsy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Center for Rapid and Sustainable Product Development of the Polytechnic Institute of Leiria, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: physiotherapy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The tracking of joint kinematics is crucial to determining the normal movement of healthy and undamaged joints, as well as the modifications that occur after an injury episode. In the last few years, the methods used to perform kinematic analysis have undergone a tremendous evolution and the practical applications of its use are vast. Moreover, the fields where these applications can be studied are diverse: sports and return to practice, animal research, traumatic injuries, clinical cases, among others. Recovery from an injury is a complex process that involves many factors, so the monitoring of the movement using joints kinematics analysis is fundamental and provides us with relevant information to understand how the mechanisms and structures are working and responding to rehabilitation intervention.

We thus invite you to submit your research on these topics, in the form of original research articles, review articles, and short communications.

Prof. Dr. Filipa João
Prof. Dr. Sandra Amado
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • kinematics
  • injury recovery
  • biomechanics

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 3073 KiB  
Article
A Diagonal Movement Pattern of Arm Elevation and Depression in Overhead Throwing Athletes: An Exploratory Kinematic Analysis for Clinical Application
by Nuno Morais, Joana Ferreira, Jéssica Gordo, João Paulo Vilas-Boas and Augusto G. Pascoal
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(19), 10691; https://doi.org/10.3390/app131910691 - 26 Sep 2023
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Abstract
Assessing scapular position and motion during functional arm movement patterns may add relevant information to the evaluation of the clinical status and athletic performance of overhead sports athletes’ shoulders. This study aimed to examine the three-dimensional scapular kinematics of elite volleyball players with [...] Read more.
Assessing scapular position and motion during functional arm movement patterns may add relevant information to the evaluation of the clinical status and athletic performance of overhead sports athletes’ shoulders. This study aimed to examine the three-dimensional scapular kinematics of elite volleyball players with (n = 11) and without scapular dyskinesis (n = 11) in comparison to non-athletes (n = 27). Four distinct arm elevation/depression tasks were assessed: shoulder abduction/adduction, flexion/extension, scaption, and a diagonal movement pattern mimicking throwing (proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation diagonal 2 for flexion/extension or PNF–D2–flx/ext). Kinematic data was recorded from the spiking/dominant shoulder using an electromagnetic system (FASTRAK, Polhemus Inc., Colchester, VT, USA); MotionMonitor v9 software, Innovative Sports Training, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). The study compared scapular rotations at 15° intervals of humero-thoracic (HT) angles, ranging from minimum to 120°. Significantly different 3D scapular kinematics were observed between traditional arm motion tasks and PNF–D2 arm motion task (HT angle × task interaction effect, p < 0.001, 0.275 ≤ ηp2 ≤ 0.772). However, when considering the combined influence of phase, HT angle, task, and group factors, no differences were found between groups (phase × HT angle × task × group, p ≥ 0.161, 0.032 ≤ ηp2 ≤ 0.058). The inclusion of a functional arm movement pattern when evaluating scapular position and movement in overhead athletes does not appear to be mandatory. However, these findings are preliminary and highlight the need for more research in this area. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Joint Kinematics Analysis and Injuries Recovery)
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11 pages, 1252 KiB  
Article
Reliability of a Global Gait Symmetry Index Based on Linear Joint Displacements
by Silvia Cabral, Rita Fernandes, William Scott Selbie, Vera Moniz-Pereira and António P. Veloso
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(24), 12558; https://doi.org/10.3390/app122412558 - 8 Dec 2022
Viewed by 1253
Abstract
Gait symmetry is commonly used as an informal measure to assess functional gait recovery. As other outcome measures used for the evaluation of clinical change over time, gait symmetry indices must be reliable. However, studies assessing the reliability of symmetry indices are scarce [...] Read more.
Gait symmetry is commonly used as an informal measure to assess functional gait recovery. As other outcome measures used for the evaluation of clinical change over time, gait symmetry indices must be reliable. However, studies assessing the reliability of symmetry indices are scarce and focused on discrete and local indices (i.e., peak joint angle, step length), which fail to assess overall gait symmetry. On the other hand, the repeatability of global symmetry indices (using multiple continuous waveforms) based on joint angles may be hampered by the sensitivity of these variables to marker placement imprecision. The aim of this study is to evaluate the test–retest intra-rater reliability and measurement error of an alternative global symmetry index. Two 3D gait analyses were performed on separate days (a week interval) on twenty-three healthy adults. Reliability and measurement error were assessed by calculating the intraclass correlation coefficient and the 95% limits of agreement, standard error of measurement and smallest detectable change, respectively. The new symmetry index presented acceptable results in terms of reliability (ICC = 0.71, 95% CI 0.33–0.88) and measurement error (95% LOA between −30.2% and 29.1%, SEM = 10.7% and SDC = 29.7%), thus being a more promising tool to assess overall gait symmetry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Joint Kinematics Analysis and Injuries Recovery)
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13 pages, 1458 KiB  
Article
Fatigue Effects on the Lower Leg Muscle Architecture Using Diffusion Tensor MRI
by Filipa João, Sérgio Alves, Mário Secca, Michael Noseworthy and António Veloso
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(19), 9767; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12199767 - 28 Sep 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1477
Abstract
Proton density (PD) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are imaging techniques that enable the acquisition of data from living subjects that can be used in the fine-tuning of subject-specific models’ architectural parameters. The aim of this study was to determine the in vivo [...] Read more.
Proton density (PD) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are imaging techniques that enable the acquisition of data from living subjects that can be used in the fine-tuning of subject-specific models’ architectural parameters. The aim of this study was to determine the in vivo 3D architectural parameters (volume, pennation angle, fiber length and physiological cross-sectional area) of the gastrocnemius medialis, gastrocnemius lateralis, soleus and tibialis anterior muscles using proton density and diffusion tensor imaging data before and after an exhaustive one-legged jump exercise. These methods were used in the in vivo 3D data acquisition of six young and physically active female subjects’ lower legs, followed by a fiber-tracking algorithm and analysis tools. No significant differences were found in the muscles’ architecture after the exercise, with the following exceptions: the anatomical cross-section area of the gastrocnemius medialis increased (p-value 0.001, effect size 0.18) after exercise; the fiber lengths of the gastrocnemius medialis, lateralis and soleus muscles were higher after exercise (p-value 0.002, 0.001 and 0.001, respectively, and effect size 2.03, 1.29 and 0.85, respectively); and the soleus mean pennation angle decreased after exercise (p-value 0.0015, effect size 2.31). These changes (or lack thereof) could be attributed to the extended acquisition time of the MRI scans to minimize noise: by increasing the acquisition time, the effect of the exercise may have been partially lost due to muscle recovery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Joint Kinematics Analysis and Injuries Recovery)
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8 pages, 734 KiB  
Article
Freedom in Osteoarthritis of the Knee
by Wangdo Kim and Emir A. Vela
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(2), 839; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12020839 - 14 Jan 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1607
Abstract
The first peak of the external knee abduction moment (KAM) is often used as a surrogate measure of the medial compartment loading and has been correlated with pain and progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). As a result, reducing the KAM is often the [...] Read more.
The first peak of the external knee abduction moment (KAM) is often used as a surrogate measure of the medial compartment loading and has been correlated with pain and progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). As a result, reducing the KAM is often the target of conservative interventions. OA should be considered as a “Whole Person” disease, including ecological psychosocial aspects. Scientists have developed gait alteration strategies to reduce the KAM. They attempted to force into a new position any particular part without reference to the pattern of the whole. We propose an alternative approach: in the vicinity of a special configuration of the knee, some or all of the components of the knee become overloaded. This study has shown that when six lines $1,$2,$3,$4,$5,$6 are so situated that forces acting along them equilibrate when applied to one degree of freedom, 1° F knee, a certain determinant vanishes. We wish to define the six lines as the knee complex in involution by virtue of some constraint upon the knee. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Joint Kinematics Analysis and Injuries Recovery)
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