Special Issue "Opportunities and Threats in Meat Processing"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 April 2023 | Viewed by 1912

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Dariusz Stasiak
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Meat Technology and Food Quality, University of Life Sciences in Lublin, ul. Skromna 8, 20-704 Lublin, Poland
Interests: meat processing; physical properties of food; food safety; quality management; applications of ultrasound
Dr. Karolina Wójciak
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Animal Food Technology, Faculty of Food Science and Biotechnology, University of Life Sciences in Lublin, ul. Skromna 8, 20-704 Lublin, Poland
Interests: oxidative stability; phenols; antioxidant activity; food safety; nitrite reduction; probiotic meat products; functional meat products
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Ewa Czarniecka-Skubina
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Gastronomy and Food Hygiene, Institute of Human Nutrition Sciences, Warsaw University of Life Sciences (WULS), str. Nowoursynowska 166, 02-787 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: quality of catering services from the dietary; technological; hygienic and consumer service aspects; effect of technological process on quality of vegetables and meat

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Scientific research on the effects of different treatments on biological materials has been carried out for over a century. During this time, knowledge and technology have developed significantly. Many technologies already use ultrasound to study properties, monitor processes, and modify the properties of food. Ultrasound interacts with matter in a multidimensional way. It can modify the physical, chemical, and biological properties of meat to be more desirable. The effects of the sonication can be direct or indirect (delayed). In addition to many other factors, this makes the scientific description (modeling) of the effect on the tissue material difficult. Many scientific publications are noncomplementary and present incomplete information (e.g., intensity, density of field). These shortcomings significantly hinder the exploitation of results on an industrial scale. They raise many new questions about the potential of ultrasound in meat processing and the threats caused by the development of this technology.

What other phenomena in meat determine the industrial use of new technologies and breeding achievements? Why is the usage of new techniques in meat technology (in meat processing) limited? What phenomena (factors) limit the use of new technologies in meat processing? What new (potential) applications of new technologies and techniques in meat processing appear, considering the latest research results? Answering many of these questions will require a new approach, taking into account the latest scientific research results and industrial experience.

How can ultrasound reduce the use of chemicals in meat processing? How does ultrasonic technology support organic meat processing? How is ultrasound used in catering? How can the ultrasound technique effectively reduce the negative impact of the meat industry on the natural environment?

Therefore, we invite you to submit your original research on these topics. Studies on new opportunities, threats, possibilities, limitations, benefits, and difficulties in the use of new technologies in meat processing are welcome.

Dr. Dariusz Stasiak
Dr. Karolina Wójciak
Prof. Dr. Ewa Czarniecka-Skubina
Prof. Dr. Igor Tomasevic
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • meat processing
  • new technologies
  • ultrasound-assisted processing
  • sonication
  • cavitation
  • cultural meat
  • new raw meat
  • meat physical properties
  • meat chemical properties
  • nutrition value of meat
  • meat quality
  • meat sensory quality
  • combined technology
  • emerging technologies
  • consumer habits related to meat

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Can Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA) Be Used to Predict Pig’s Meat Quality In Vivo?
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(23), 12035; https://doi.org/10.3390/app122312035 - 24 Nov 2022
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Abstract
The aim of the current study was to evaluate the possibility of application of bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) in order to estimate pork quality. The BIA measurements were tested on 18 living animals for the prediction of the meat quality. The absolute resultant [...] Read more.
The aim of the current study was to evaluate the possibility of application of bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) in order to estimate pork quality. The BIA measurements were tested on 18 living animals for the prediction of the meat quality. The absolute resultant electrical resistance (Rz) and reactance (Xc) of the body was measured with a set of disposable surface electrodes at the frequency of 50 kHz and the current intensity of 400 µA. The characteristics of meat quality, pH measured 1 h and 24 h after slaughter, meat color parameters represented in CIE L*a*b* system, glycolytic potential, intramuscular fat, and natural drip loss, were assessed on the samples of the Longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle. The slaughter value of pigs was characterized on the basis of hot carcass weight (HCW) and percent of meat in carcass. The results showed a significant Pearson correlation between bioelectrical impedance parameter Rz and pH1 (r = 0.48*, p < 0.05). A significant Spearman correlation was showed between color b* value and the Rz/Xc/HCW ratio (r = −0.62*, p < 0.05) and Xc (r = −0.51*, p < 0.05), as well as between the Rz/Xc ratio with pH1 (r = 0.48*, p < 0.05). The multivariate statistical method (principal component analysis and cluster analysis) showed that bioimpedance measurements combined with meat quality traits make it possible to distinguish groups with different quality parameters. However, the relationships between them are complex and still require analysis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Opportunities and Threats in Meat Processing)
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Article
Hybrid Meat Products: Incorporation of White Bean Flour in Lean Pork Burgers
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(15), 7571; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12157571 - 27 Jul 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 565
Abstract
The effect of partial lean pork-meat replacement by white Phaseolus vulgaris L. flour in hybrid burgers was studied. A multivariate regression model was used to test different bean flour levels (BF: 8–15 g/100 g) and water/bean flour ratios (W/BF: 1.2, 1.6, and 1.8 [...] Read more.
The effect of partial lean pork-meat replacement by white Phaseolus vulgaris L. flour in hybrid burgers was studied. A multivariate regression model was used to test different bean flour levels (BF: 8–15 g/100 g) and water/bean flour ratios (W/BF: 1.2, 1.6, and 1.8 g/g). Process yield, texture profile analysis, color parameters, thermal transitions, and microstructure of the systems were analyzed. Respond Surface Methodology was used to model the response behaviors and optimization. Burgers with BF showed yields higher than 88%. Hardness and cohesiveness decreased as the BF level increased, with a more noticeable effect when the W/BF ratio became larger. Regarding color, the higher the BF and the W/BF ratio in burgers, the higher the L* obtained. The desirability optimization predicted an optimum formulation consisting of 15 g BF/100 g and 1.36 g/g W/BF with similar attributes to a commercial pork burger. The thermal analysis showed an increase in the enthalpy associated with the myosin denaturation and the interactions between meat proteins and BF led to higher temperatures for the starch gelatinization and protein denaturation. The microstructure of BF burgers presented a more stable coarse gel matrix derived from coagulated meat proteins combined with the flour components. The mathematical procedure adequately predicted the hybrid burger quality attributes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Opportunities and Threats in Meat Processing)
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Review

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Review
Healthier Meat Products Are Fashionable—Consumers Love Fashion
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(19), 10129; https://doi.org/10.3390/app121910129 - 09 Oct 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 568
Abstract
Meat manufacturers are nowadays in a very unenviable position. Both meat and meat products require the utilization of various additives due to their chemical composition. On the other hand, consumers demand fresh, additive-free, and high-quality products with extended shelf-life, which might be considered [...] Read more.
Meat manufacturers are nowadays in a very unenviable position. Both meat and meat products require the utilization of various additives due to their chemical composition. On the other hand, consumers demand fresh, additive-free, and high-quality products with extended shelf-life, which might be considered as healthier, even functional food. These facts push manufacturers and researchers in pursuit of modern technologies and supplements to meet these high demands. Since a high daily intake of sodium and fat might cause severe health issues, reducing these ingredients in meat products is the first task towards healthier food. Sodium can be reduced by ultrasound, high-pressure processing, pulsed electric field, and replacement of NaCl with KCl, calcium gluconate, calcium glycerophosphate, calcium lactate, and monosodium glutamate. The reduction of the fat content can be achieved through a decrease in the amount of fatty tissue in the inital mixture and/or replacement with non-lipid components, or by partial fatty tissue replacement with oils rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids. Utilization of plant proteins (soy, wheat gluten, pea, chickpea, lentil, potato, barley, oat, rice, etc.), mycoproteins or micro-algae proteins, plant fats (palm and coconut fat, canola, sunflower, soy and corn oil, etc.), and polysaccharides (starches, fibers), accompanied by a meat-like fibrous structure, resulted in delicious “meat” products, which are considered a healthier alternative to real meat. Growing interest in the replacement of potentially adverse synthetic meat additives favors the use of plant (herb, fruit and vegetable) extracts, as an endless source of bioactive substances with strong antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. These extracts can be used either in raw meat or meat products, as well as in the fodder. Reformulation strategies strengthen and ensure the willingness of consumers to pay a higher price for their own demands regarding the naturalness of synthetic, clean-labeled, additive-free meat products. After a gradual alignment with strategic national/international recommendations and legal/sub-legal frameworks, the added value of such meat products opens wide the door to new segments/entire markets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Opportunities and Threats in Meat Processing)
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