Special Issue "Psychoacoustic Engineering and Applications"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Acoustics and Vibrations".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Hyunkook Lee

Applied Psychoacoustics Lab, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield HD1 3DH, UK
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Psychoacoustics is an important research field not only for understanding the fundamental mechanism of human auditory perception, but also for developing methods of capturing, processing, and measuring audio signals for practical applications. The present Special Issue aims to introduce the state-of-the-art of psychoacoustics engineering in various application areas and explore new directions of psychoacoustics research in the age of technological convergence and artificial intelligence. This Special Issue will aim to collect 10 to 20 papers and will be published as a book collection.  

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Audio coding
  • Audio for virtual and augmented reality
  • Audio using artificial intelligence
  • Hearing aids
  • Interactive audio
  • Building/Environmental acoustics
  • Soundscapes
  • Spatial audio (multichannel and binaural)
  • Sound recording and mixing techniques
  • The sound-quality prediction model

Dr. Hyunkook Lee
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access bimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • audio coding
  • interactive audio
  • artificial intelligence
  • virtual/augmented reality
  • building/environmental acoustics
  • hearing aid
  • soundscape
  • sound recording
  • sound quality
  • spatial audio

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Influence of Contextual Factors on Soundscape in Urban Open Spaces
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(12), 2524; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8122524
Received: 13 November 2018 / Revised: 1 December 2018 / Accepted: 4 December 2018 / Published: 6 December 2018
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Abstract
The acoustic environment in urban open spaces has played a key role for users. This study analyzed the different effects of contextual factors, including shop openness, season, and commercial function, on the soundscape in two typical commercial pedestrian streets. The following observations were
[...] Read more.
The acoustic environment in urban open spaces has played a key role for users. This study analyzed the different effects of contextual factors, including shop openness, season, and commercial function, on the soundscape in two typical commercial pedestrian streets. The following observations were based on a series of measurements, including crowd measurements, acoustic environment measurements, and a questionnaire survey. First, the number of talkers in Central Avenue was greater than the number of talkers in Kuan Alley in cases with the same crowd density, while there was no significant difference in the sound pressure level. When the crowd density increased, acoustic comfort trended downward in Kuan Alley, while the value of acoustic comfort in Central Avenue took a parabolic shape. Second, there was no significant difference between the number of talkers in summer and the number of talkers in winter; however, when crowd density increased by 0.1 persons/m2, the level of sound pressure increased by 1.3 dBA in winter and 2.2 dBA in summer. Acoustic comfort took a parabolic shape that first increased and then decreased in both winter and summer. Regarding commercial function, as the crowd density increased, the number of talkers and the level of sound pressure both increased, while acoustic comfort decreased in three zones with different commercial functions. In addition, a cross-tab analysis was used to discuss the relationship between the number of talkers and the level of sound pressure, and it was found to be positive. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychoacoustic Engineering and Applications)
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Open AccessArticle A Perceptual Evaluation of Individual and Non-Individual HRTFs: A Case Study of the SADIE II Database
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(11), 2029; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8112029
Received: 14 September 2018 / Revised: 14 October 2018 / Accepted: 18 October 2018 / Published: 23 October 2018
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Abstract
As binaural audio continues to permeate immersive technologies, it is vital to develop a detailed understanding of the perceptual relevance of HRTFs. Previous research has explored the benefit of individual HRTFs with respect to localisation. However, localisation is only one metric with which
[...] Read more.
As binaural audio continues to permeate immersive technologies, it is vital to develop a detailed understanding of the perceptual relevance of HRTFs. Previous research has explored the benefit of individual HRTFs with respect to localisation. However, localisation is only one metric with which it is possible to rate spatial audio. This paper evaluates the perceived timbral and spatial characteristics of both individual and non-individual HRTFs and compares the results to overall preference. To that end, the measurement and evaluation of a high-resolution multi-environment binaural Impulse Response database is presented for 20 subjects, including the KU100 and KEMAR binaural mannequins. Post-processing techniques, including low frequency compensation and diffuse field equalisation are discussed in relation to the 8802 unique HRTFs measured for each mannequin and 2818/2114 HRTFs measured for each human. Listening test results indicate that particular HRTF sets are preferred more generally by subjects over their own individual measurements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychoacoustic Engineering and Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Diffuse-Field Equalisation of Binaural Ambisonic Rendering
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(10), 1956; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8101956
Received: 9 October 2018 / Revised: 9 October 2018 / Accepted: 13 October 2018 / Published: 17 October 2018
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Abstract
Ambisonics has enjoyed a recent resurgence in popularity due to virtual reality applications. Low order Ambisonic reproduction is inherently inaccurate at high frequencies, which causes poor timbre and height localisation. Diffuse-Field Equalisation (DFE), the theory of removing direction-independent frequency response, is applied to
[...] Read more.
Ambisonics has enjoyed a recent resurgence in popularity due to virtual reality applications. Low order Ambisonic reproduction is inherently inaccurate at high frequencies, which causes poor timbre and height localisation. Diffuse-Field Equalisation (DFE), the theory of removing direction-independent frequency response, is applied to binaural (over headphones) Ambisonic rendering to address high-frequency reproduction. DFE of Ambisonics is evaluated by comparing binaural Ambisonic rendering to direct convolution via head-related impulse responses (HRIRs) in three ways: spectral difference, predicted sagittal plane localisation and perceptual listening tests on timbre. Results show DFE successfully improves frequency reproduction of binaural Ambisonic rendering for the majority of sound source locations, as well as the limitations of the technique, and set the basis for further research in the field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychoacoustic Engineering and Applications)
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