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New Innovations in Plant-Based Dairy Alternatives

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 November 2021) | Viewed by 6272

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Center of Bioimmobilisation and Innovative Packaging Materials, Faculty of Food Sciences and Fisheries, West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, 71-270 Szczecin, Poland
Interests: functional foods; plant-based foods; dairy alternatives; biotransformation; by-products valorization; fermented products; bioactivity; probiotics; biopolymers; food microbiology; lactic acid bacteria
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Guest Editor
Department of Applied Microbiology and Physiology of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Food Sciences and Fisheries, West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin, Poland
Interests: food microbiology; lactic acid bacteria; probiotics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the recent years, vegetarian and vegan diets have become more widespread because consumers are paying greater attention to nutritional, ethical, and cultural aspects of their diet. This has created a huge demand for dairy product alternatives. Furthermore, the ongoing trend of vegetarianism, with an increasing number of vegan/vegetarian consumers, has established a massive global importance of plant-based products. Plant-based dairy (milk, yogurt, kefir, cheese) substitutes are gaining popularity, and are candidates that meet the needs of the 21st century consumers in terms of being rich in nutrients as well as bioactive and functional ingredients. The search for new functional food ingredients from natural sources and from by-products represents one of the most important challenges in food science and technology. Plants represent a valuable source of minerals, proteins, fatty acids, fiber, and bioactive substances, and they constitute important raw materials for the development of novel functional foods.

This Special Issue provides an opportunity to discuss trends in all aspects of innovative dairy alternatives, related to food science, industry, and public health. Potential topics include processes for the development of novel plant-based products of high added value (bioactivity, high microorganism survivability, health-promoting effects), which can be characterized as functional foods, and include original research articles and reviews studying the technological aspects, safety, and health benefits of these products.

Dr. Łukasz Łopusiewicz
Prof. Dr. Elżbieta Bogusławska-Wąs
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Innovations in dairy alternatives
  • Milk substitutes
  • Plant milks
  • Cheese analogues
  • Biotransformation and fermentation
  • Dairy-type functional foods

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 808 KiB  
Article
Production and Characterization of Yogurt-Like Fermented Beverage Based on Camelina (Camelina sativa L.) Seed Press Cake
by Łukasz Łopusiewicz, Paweł Kwiatkowski and Emilia Drozłowska
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(3), 1085; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12031085 - 20 Jan 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2671
Abstract
Plant-based fermented beverages are growing in popularity due to the rise in vegetarianism, health trends and ethical concerns. In this study, camelina (Camelina sativa L.) seed press cake (CPC, 15% and 20% w/w) was fermented using yogurt starter culture. [...] Read more.
Plant-based fermented beverages are growing in popularity due to the rise in vegetarianism, health trends and ethical concerns. In this study, camelina (Camelina sativa L.) seed press cake (CPC, 15% and 20% w/w) was fermented using yogurt starter culture. The physicochemical properties of the samples, including pH, total acidity, color, viscosity, texture and rheological properties were investigated. Moreover, the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) viability, bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity were determined. During fermentation and 28-day refrigerated storage, the samples achieved a mean viable bacterial count of at least 1010 CFU/g, which is higher than the recommended bacteria level for traditional dairy yogurt (106 CFU/g). A significant acidification, consumption of reducing sugars, increase in free amino acids and polyphenolics was observed. In addition, CPC-based fermented samples showed good antioxidant potential. Textural and rheological characteristics were similar to dairy yogurt. Moreover, fermentation improved the sensory attributes of CPC, meeting consumers’ acceptance criteria. Thus, the study indicated that fermentation had a marked effect on the physicochemical, microbiological and functional properties of CPC. Therefore, the fermented CPC-based beverage has the potential to be a valid, value-added and novel alternative to dairy-based yogurt. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Innovations in Plant-Based Dairy Alternatives)
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14 pages, 1097 KiB  
Article
Emmer-Based Beverage Fortified with Fruit Juices
by Dimitra Dimitrellou, Panagiotis Kandylis, Evangelos Kokkinomagoulos, Magdalini Hatzikamari and Argyro Bekatorou
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(7), 3116; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11073116 - 31 Mar 2021
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 2781
Abstract
Nowadays, there is a growing consumer demand for non-dairy functional foods due to several health issues related to milk and dairy consumption and increasing vegetarianism. Following that trend, in the present study emmer-based beverages were developed after flour gelatinization, fortification with fruit juices [...] Read more.
Nowadays, there is a growing consumer demand for non-dairy functional foods due to several health issues related to milk and dairy consumption and increasing vegetarianism. Following that trend, in the present study emmer-based beverages were developed after flour gelatinization, fortification with fruit juices (blueberry, aronia, and grape) and fermentation with the potential probiotic strain Lactiplantibacillus plantarum 2035. The produced beverages were subjected to a 4-week storage at 4 °C. The addition of juices significantly affected the physicochemical characteristics of the beverages, while resulting in increased red color. Total phenolic content (22.3–31.9 mg gallic acid equivalents 100 g−1) and antioxidant activity (94–136 μmol Trolox equivalents 100 g−1) were significantly higher in the case of aronia juice followed by blueberry and grape juice. All beverages showed high values of apparent viscosity and water-holding capacity. Lactiplantibacillus plantarum 2035 retained high viable counts during storage especially in beverages with fruit juices (>108 cells g−1 up to 21st day) revealing a positive effect of the juices. The obtained results show that emmer-based beverages fortified with fruit juices (aronia, blueberry, and grape) have a great potential as carriers of probiotics, prebiotics and other functional compounds and may be served as an ideal alternative to dairy products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Innovations in Plant-Based Dairy Alternatives)
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