applsci-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Oxidation-Reduction Phenomena in Wines

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2023) | Viewed by 4701

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Food, Department of Chemistry, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina, Greece
Interests: cheese manufacture and ripening; wine oxidation; oil oxidation; aroma compounds; antioxidants; bioactivities; enzymes; healthy food development
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Agricultural University of Athens, Iera Odos 75, 11855 Athens, Greece
Interests: wine chemistry; polyphenolic compounds; astringency; sensory analysis; antioxidant activity
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Oxidation–reduction phenomena are crucial for wine quality. Must oxidation occurs via enzymic reactions while wine oxidation occurs via free radical reactions.

Since most contemporary commercial wines are produced by technologies that prevent oxidation, oxidation–reduction phenomena mostly take place during wine storage and aging. In wine production, controlled oxidation may be used to improve wine quality (micro-oxygenation, must hyperoxidation) or to ensure that the wine conforms to a particular style (e.g., sherry, jura, specific dessert wines). On the other hand, the oxidation of wine is commonly associated with quality deterioration. The changes in wine sensory properties are detrimental and mostly consist of increased browning color, loss of the pleasant fruity aromas, and appearance of unpleasant odors. Sulfur dioxide is commonly used in winemaking as an antioxidant and antimicrobial agent. However, due to its negative effect on human health and wine quality, there is a global trend to eliminate its use. Subsequently, several methodologies have been developed for decreasing wine oxidation and the levels of sulfur dioxide used.

Today, there is an increasing demand by the consumers for high-quality wines with excellent organoleptic properties. Avoiding extensive wine oxidation is thus a priority for the wine sector to increase competitiveness and marketability and attract consumer attention.

Original and review papers dealing with wine oxidation are welcomed for inclusion in this Special Issue that will focus primarily on the following:

  • Mechanisms of wine oxidation
  • Role of sulfur dioxide and methodologies for its decrease
  • Wine antioxidant compounds (e.g., phenolic compounds, glutathione, etc.)
  • Wine aroma compounds
  • Development of methods to monitor and/or model oxidation
  • Impact of processing techniques and additives
  • Effect of maturation, aging, and storage (barrel aging, bottle storage)
  • Micro-oxygenation, hyperoxidation processes
  • Copigmentation, red wine color stabilization
  • Oxidative wines (sherry, jura, madeira, etc.)
  • Impact of wine packaging materials
  • Affected sensory parameters
  • Health beneficial properties of wine antioxidants

Prof. Dr. Ioannis G. Roussis
Prof. Dr. Stamatina Kallithraka
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • oxidation
  • browning
  • polyphenols
  • glutathione
  • aroma compounds
  • sulfur dioxide
  • antioxidants
  • barrel aging
  • bottle storage
  • micro-oxygenation
  • copigmentation
  • sherry wines
  • dessert wines
  • wine packaging
  • shelf life
  • sensory quality

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

11 pages, 3327 KiB  
Article
Analysis of a Special Sulphite-Producing Yeast Starter after Fermentation and during Wine Maturation
by Diána Sárdy Nyitrai, Zsuzsanna Varga, Annamária Sólyom-Leskó, Miklós Kállay, Szabina Steckl, Balázs Nagy, Dorottya Kocsis and Eszter Antal
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(17), 8848; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12178848 - 2 Sep 2022
Viewed by 1247
Abstract
In the present study, we investigated the extent to which specific sulphur dioxide-producing wine yeasts produce SO2 during alcoholic fermentation and whether the SO2 they produce is sufficient to prevent oxidation during wine storage. Fermentation was carried out at 12 °C [...] Read more.
In the present study, we investigated the extent to which specific sulphur dioxide-producing wine yeasts produce SO2 during alcoholic fermentation and whether the SO2 they produce is sufficient to prevent oxidation during wine storage. Fermentation was carried out at 12 °C and 20 °C. After inoculation with yeast, the evolution of free and total sulphurous acid concentrations, acetaldehyde concentrations (11.6–46.9 mg L−1) and total polyphenol concentrations (137.4–244.7 mg L−1), including leucoanthocyanin and catechin concentrations (leucoanthocyanidin: 8.5–75.1 mg L−1; catechin: 70.8–115.4 mg L−1), were investigated during the storage of fermented wines. The amount of free sulphur dioxide was measured between 5 and 10 mg L−1. Total sulphuric acid ranged from 6 to 22 mg L−1, taking into account the results of the three years studied. The aim of our tests was to observe whether the use of sulphur-producing yeasts during the ageing of fermented wines showed any benefit. The results of all three vintages tested showed that neither the 12 °C nor the 20 °C fermented batches showed any advantage in using sulphur dioxide-producing yeasts. Our results show that there is no clear evidence that the yeast produces sufficient sulphur dioxide during fermentation and that there is no clear demonstrable benefit from its use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidation-Reduction Phenomena in Wines)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 1234 KiB  
Article
Browning Development and Antioxidant Compounds in White Wines after Selenium, Iron, and Peroxide Addition
by Eftihia Vlahou, Stefania Christofi, Ioannis G. Roussis and Stamatina Kallithraka
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(8), 3834; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12083834 - 11 Apr 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2493
Abstract
The effect of oxidation on the organoleptic properties of white wines mostly involves increased browning color, loss of the fruity aromas, and appearance of unpleasant odors. Browning, however, is known to be related with polyphenol oxidation and therefore it may be delayed by [...] Read more.
The effect of oxidation on the organoleptic properties of white wines mostly involves increased browning color, loss of the fruity aromas, and appearance of unpleasant odors. Browning, however, is known to be related with polyphenol oxidation and therefore it may be delayed by the presence of antioxidants such as selenium (Se) and SO2. On the other hand, the presence of oxidants such as metal ions and H2O2 can accelerate browning and oxidation phenomena. The browning capacity, the phenolic composition (both total and individual contents of flavanols and hydroxycinnamic acids), the antioxidant activity, and the SO2 content of Assyrtiko white wines were studied after the addition of Fe2+ and H2O2 and Se at two temperatures, employing an accelerated test. Browning was approached from a kinetic point of view, and the study was focused on the implication of oxidants and antioxidants on browning rate, paying particular attention to the content of major redox-active polyphenols, including substances with an o-diphenol feature, such as flavanols and hydroxycinnamic acids. The results showed that after the addition of oxidants it was possible to significantly accelerate the rate of browning development (up to 4.7 and six times) depending on the temperature and the concentration of the added compounds. The presence of Se protected wine color and preserved total SO2 at 35 °C, while at 50 °C, these effects were not observed. Total flavanol content decreased upon heating, while total hydroxycinnamic content showed a slight increase. Similarly, the content of the individual phenolic compounds (with the exception of caffeic acid and (+)-catechin at 35 °C) was decreased with oxidant addition, while Se addition was not adequate to prevent or even promote their oxidation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidation-Reduction Phenomena in Wines)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop