Special Issue "Optical Wireless Communications"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Optics and Lasers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. George K. Karagiannidis

Director of Telecommunications Systems & Networks Lab, Electrical & Computer Engineering Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124, Greece
Website | E-Mail
Interests: wireless communications; wireless power transfer and applications; optical wireless communications; communications for biomedical engineering; wireless security
Guest Editor
Dr. Goran T. Djordjevic

University of Nis, Faculty of Electronic Engineering, Department of Telecommunications, Serbia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: wireless communications theory; free-space optical communications; cooperative networks; modulations; error-correction codes; diversity reception
Guest Editor
Dr. Panagiotis D. Diamantoulakis

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124, Greece
Website | E-Mail
Interests: optical wireless communications; wireless communications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Considering the rapidly-expanding volume of traffic on mobile networks, the critical question is how the current telecommunication networks can accommodate a further increase in the data rate, while maintaining energy consumption, latency, cost, and complexity level. To meet the above requirements, the utilization of optical wireless communications (OWC) is a promising alternative to RF. OWC provides a number of interesting features, including: (i) very high data rates, (ii) inherent security, (iii) no electromagnetic interference, and (iv) wide bandwidth.

This Special Issue will provide a forum for the latest research and innovations in OWC technologies, as well as their applications, and will bridge the gap between theory and practice in the design of OWC-based systems. Prospective authors are invited to submit original manuscripts on topics including, but not limited to:

  • Indoor and outdoor optical wireless channel and network modeling
  • Visible light, infrared, and ultraviolet communications
  • Modulation and coding techniques for OWC
  • Information theory and capacity of OW channels
  • Signal processing for OWC
  • MIMO and OFDM techniques for OWC
  • Multiple access, scheduling, and interference coordination
  • Resource allocation and energy efficiency in OWC
  • Topology control and routing for free space optical (FSO) networks
  • Airborne FSO systems
  • Atmospheric effects on the performance of FSO links
  • Long wavelength FSO communications
  • Multihop OWC
  • Hybrid OW/RF communication systems and integration with the 5G
  • Optical camera communication
  • OW sensor networks
  • OWC-based system for positioning
  • Vehicular OWC
  • Underwater OWC systems
  • OWC in medical applications

Prof. George K. Karagiannidis
Prof. Goran T. Djordjevic
Dr. Panagiotis D. Diamantoulakis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Optical wireless communications
  • visible light communications
  • infrared communications
  • ultraviolet communications
  • free space optical

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Power Allocation of Non-Orthogonal Multiple Access Based on Dynamic User Priority for Indoor QoS-Guaranteed Visible Light Communication Networks
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(8), 1219; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8081219
Received: 25 June 2018 / Revised: 4 July 2018 / Accepted: 18 July 2018 / Published: 25 July 2018
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Abstract
Non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) simultaneously provides multi-user access over the same frequency band or time period, which can significantly improve system throughput in visible light communication (VLC) networks. However, the different interference components of NOMA and the diversified user requirements in VLC are [...] Read more.
Non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) simultaneously provides multi-user access over the same frequency band or time period, which can significantly improve system throughput in visible light communication (VLC) networks. However, the different interference components of NOMA and the diversified user requirements in VLC are difficult to coordinate. To guarantee both throughput enhancement and quality of service (QoS) satisfaction, this paper presents a power allocation scheme based on dynamic user priority in indoor NOMA-VLC networks. We introduce fuzzy logic (FL) to flexibly analyse user priority and assign signal power using multi-dimensional user features. The experimental results show that our method achieves the best performance in terms of user fairness and satisfaction. In indoor VLC, which has small cells with a high user density, our method outperforms contrastive schemes in terms of the average user data rate (AUDR). Therefore, in comparisons between static and dynamic user priority, our study indicates the fairness advantages of FL for the dynamic evaluation of user priority. In comparisons between NOMA and orthogonal multiple access, our study reflects the AUDR advantages of non-orthogonal methods. Furthermore, in comparisons of user satisfaction, our method outperforms existing methods, indicating the achievement of the QoS guarantee. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Wireless Communications)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Differential Signalling in Free-Space Optical Communication Systems
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(6), 872; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8060872
Received: 18 April 2018 / Revised: 14 May 2018 / Accepted: 18 May 2018 / Published: 25 May 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1960 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper, we review the differential signalling techniques and investigate its implementation of in free-space optical (FSO) communication systems. The paper is an extended version of our previous works, where the effects of background noise, weak turbulence and pointing errors (PE) were [...] Read more.
In this paper, we review the differential signalling techniques and investigate its implementation of in free-space optical (FSO) communication systems. The paper is an extended version of our previous works, where the effects of background noise, weak turbulence and pointing errors (PE) were investigated separately. Here, for the first time, we present a thorough description of the differential signalling scheme including for combined effects. At first, we present an extension of the analysis of differential signalling to the case of moderate to strong atmospheric turbulence. Next, we investigate a more general case where both channel turbulence and PE are taken into consideration. We provide closed-form expressions for the optimal detection threshold and the average bit-error-rate, and present a set of numerical results to illustrate the performance improvement offered by the proposed differential signalling under various turbulence and PE conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Wireless Communications)
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Open AccessArticle DF Relayed Subcarrier FSO Links over Malaga Turbulence Channels with Phase Noise and Non-Zero Boresight Pointing Errors
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(5), 664; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8050664
Received: 16 February 2018 / Revised: 5 April 2018 / Accepted: 13 April 2018 / Published: 25 April 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2911 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Subcarrier free-space optical (FSO) systems using coherent recovery techniques at the receiver have acquired growing research interest in recent times. However, their optimal performance is diminished by the non-perfect synchronization of carrier frequency and phase, which is mainly due to phase noise problems. [...] Read more.
Subcarrier free-space optical (FSO) systems using coherent recovery techniques at the receiver have acquired growing research interest in recent times. However, their optimal performance is diminished by the non-perfect synchronization of carrier frequency and phase, which is mainly due to phase noise problems. Moreover, turbulence and pointing error effects further deteriorate the overall performance. However, relay transmission schemes can extend the coverage distance and offer substantial improvements over fading conditions. In this respect, we consider a serially relayed network using decode-and-forward relays, and investigate its performance by means of average symbol error probability and mean outage duration. Turbulence is modeled by the recently unified M(alaga) distribution, which constitutes a very general statistical model that accurately describes the irradiance fluctuations from weak-to-strong turbulence conditions. Additionally, the presence of non-zero boresight pointing errors due to misalignment between the transmitter–receiver pair is considered, while the effect of phase noise is specified by a Tikhonov distribution. A comparison between single line-of-sight and serially relayed FSO configurations is provided as well. Novel approximated mathematical expressions are deduced, which are proved to be accurate enough over a wide range of turbulence strengths and signal-to-noise values. Finally, proper numerical results are presented and validated by Monte Carlo simulations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Wireless Communications)
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Review

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Open AccessReview High-Speed Visible Light Communications: Enabling Technologies and State of the Art
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(4), 589; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8040589
Received: 3 January 2018 / Revised: 3 March 2018 / Accepted: 30 March 2018 / Published: 9 April 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (19855 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In the nearest decades, the rapidly increasing demand of wireless connectivity has resulted in the ubiquitous deployment of wireless systems as well as heavily congested wireless spectrum. Owing to the various inherent advantages, such as spectral and bandwidth relief, no healthy concern, high [...] Read more.
In the nearest decades, the rapidly increasing demand of wireless connectivity has resulted in the ubiquitous deployment of wireless systems as well as heavily congested wireless spectrum. Owing to the various inherent advantages, such as spectral and bandwidth relief, no healthy concern, high security, low cost, and low interference with Radio Frequency (RF) waves, visible light communication (VLC) has been an emerging optical wireless data transmission approach that can act as a good complement to and substitute for Radio Frequency. How to achieve a high-speed data transmission is a key problem to be solved in the VLC system. This review mainly focuses on the enabling technologies for high-speed VLC systems, including novel transmitter architectures, blue filters and advanced modulation, and equalization technologies. And the inherent advantages, potential applications, and some issues of VLC that need further study are presented as well. Finally, a comprehensive survey on the recent developments and the key contributions by research groups involved in the field of high-speed VLC is provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Wireless Communications)
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