Non-destructive Evaluation for Products and Processes

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Civil Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 March 2024) | Viewed by 5335

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Aeronautics, Faculty of Engineering, Imperial College London, London, UK
Interests: aeronautics; fracture mechanics; structural health monitoring; computational mechanics
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Guest Editor
Department of Engineering, University of Campania “L. Vanvitelli”, Via Roma 29, 81031 Aversa, Italy
Interests: finite element method; failure mechanisms; structural health monitoring; computational solid mechanics; damage tolerance; structural analysis

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Guest Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods are becoming essential for enhancing the monitoring, maintenance and repair operations of both products and industrial processes. Thus, NDE methods, which also include structural health monitoring (SHM) systems, can be used to identify product and process anomalies, provide indications about the location and severity of anomalies, and assess the residual strength of damaged structures and the efficiency of processes.

In recent years, although NDE methods and SHM systems have become increasingly researched, further efforts must be made to enhance their use in real engineering applications and industrial contexts.

This Special Issue aims to collate recent contributions to the research on NDE methods and SHM systems, providing methods for advancing these systems, as well as the assessment and monitoring of products and processes; innovative aspects about their application in different engineering fields and details about the development of modelling techniques to support the design and the use of such methods.

Therefore, findings of theoretical, analytical, numerical, or experimental investigations can be presented, and review articles may also be submitted.

The potential topics of this Special Issue include, but are not limited to:

  • NDE methods;
  • SHM systems;
  • Numerical modelling to support the design of NDE methods and SHM systems;
  • SHM and NDE for maintenance management and repair operations;
  • Anomaly diagnosis and prognosis;
  • Measurements and processing algorithms for the identification and characterization of anomalies.

Prof. Dr. M. H. Ferri Aliabadi
Prof. Dr. Francesco Caputo
Dr. Alessandro De Luca
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • NDE methods
  • SHM systems
  • maintenance
  • data analysis
  • numerical models

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 7618 KiB  
Article
Automatic Measurement of Contact Stress and Connection Force of Interference Components by Ultrasound
by Xianrui He, Xingyuan Wang, Chonglin Xu and Yue Wang
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(22), 12461; https://doi.org/10.3390/app132212461 - 17 Nov 2023
Viewed by 827
Abstract
Tiny interference components play an important role in the aerospace and instrumentation fields. Contact stress and connection force are important factors in evaluating the reliability and service life of components. In this study, the ultrasonic method is used to measure the stress distribution [...] Read more.
Tiny interference components play an important role in the aerospace and instrumentation fields. Contact stress and connection force are important factors in evaluating the reliability and service life of components. In this study, the ultrasonic method is used to measure the stress distribution and the connection force on the mating interface. Based on statistical microcontact theory, the virtual thin-layer model, and the asperity interaction model, the contact acoustic model is optimized. On this basis, the mapping relationship between contact stress and contact stiffness can be further obtained. This relationship was obtained by calibration experiments. Then, the stress distribution on the interface with two different structures, namely the uniform cylinder and the step cylinder, was measured and compared with the theoretical results of the thick-walled cylinder theory. The results show that the two have good consistency. Finally, based on the stress distribution, the connection force was calculated and compared with the experimental results. The results show that the ultrasonic measurement method can accurately measure the connection force, and the relative error is within 16%. Therefore, this study can provide a good method for the quality assessment of interference components. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-destructive Evaluation for Products and Processes)
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21 pages, 27276 KiB  
Article
Identification of Damage in Beams by Modal Curvatures Using Acoustic Beamformers
by Annamaria Pau and Uğurcan Eroğlu
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(19), 10557; https://doi.org/10.3390/app131910557 - 22 Sep 2023
Viewed by 943
Abstract
This paper presents an approach to damage identification in beams by modal curvatures based on the use of beamforming algorithms. These processors have been successfully used in acoustics for the last thirty years to solve the inverse problems encountered in source recognition and [...] Read more.
This paper presents an approach to damage identification in beams by modal curvatures based on the use of beamforming algorithms. These processors have been successfully used in acoustics for the last thirty years to solve the inverse problems encountered in source recognition and image reconstruction, based on ultrasonic waves. In addition, beamformers apply to a broader range of problems in which the forward solutions are computable and measurable. This especially concerns the field of structural vibrations, where the use of such estimators has not received attention to date. In this paper, modal curvatures will play the role of replica vectors of the imaging field. The choice to use modal curvatures is motivated by means of numerical studies and experimental tests on a steel beam. Furthermore, we compare the performance of the Bartlett and minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR) beamformers with an estimator based on the simple minimization of the difference between model and measured data. The results suggest that the application of the MVDR beamformer is highly effective, especially in cases of slight damage between two sensors. MVDR enables both damage localization and quantification. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-destructive Evaluation for Products and Processes)
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24 pages, 24077 KiB  
Article
Influence of Composite Thickness on Ultrasonic Guided Wave Propagation for Damage Detection Using Embedded PZT Transducers
by Tianyi Feng and M. H. Ferri Aliabadi
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(18), 10474; https://doi.org/10.3390/app131810474 - 19 Sep 2023
Viewed by 768
Abstract
This paper describes a study that focuses on assessing the influence of composites with different thicknesses (2 mm, 4 mm, and 9 mm) on embedded ultrasonic guided waves (UGWs) under varying temperatures. The study also demonstrates the effectiveness of these embedded sensors in [...] Read more.
This paper describes a study that focuses on assessing the influence of composites with different thicknesses (2 mm, 4 mm, and 9 mm) on embedded ultrasonic guided waves (UGWs) under varying temperatures. The study also demonstrates the effectiveness of these embedded sensors in identifying damage. A novel cut-out method that included an embedded diagnostic layer and phased-array lead zirconate titanate (PZT) transducers, created using the ink-jet printing technique in the manufacturing process was employed. The research then focused on studying the behavior of UGWs under varying temperatures for each composite panel. This analysis aimed to understand how temperature variations affected the propagation of guided waves in thick composites. Finally, artificial damage on the surface and impact damage were introduced, both embedded and surface-mounted PZT transducers were used to detect and locate these damages in different thickness composite panels. The results of damage localization indicated that the embedded PZT transducers were more sensitive than the surface-mounted transducers in locating the damage in thick composites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-destructive Evaluation for Products and Processes)
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Review

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19 pages, 1332 KiB  
Review
Diagnosing and Balancing Approaches of Bowed Rotating Systems: A Review
by Nima Rezazadeh, Alessandro De Luca, Giuseppe Lamanna and Francesco Caputo
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(18), 9157; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12189157 - 13 Sep 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2050
Abstract
Driven/driving shafts are the most important portion of rotating devices. Misdiagnosis or late diagnosis of these components could result in severe vibrations, defects in other parts (particularly bearings), and ultimately catastrophic failures. A shaft bow is a common problem in heavy rotating systems [...] Read more.
Driven/driving shafts are the most important portion of rotating devices. Misdiagnosis or late diagnosis of these components could result in severe vibrations, defects in other parts (particularly bearings), and ultimately catastrophic failures. A shaft bow is a common problem in heavy rotating systems equipped with such attachments as blades, discs, etc. Many factors can cause the shaft bending; this malfunction can be temporary, such as the bow resulting from a rotor gravitational sag, or can be permanent, such as shrink fitting. Since bending effects are similar to those induced by the classic eccentricity of the mass from the geometric center, i.e., unbalancing, distinguishing the differences in dynamic behaviors, as well as the symptoms, can be a labor-intensive and specialized task. This article represents a review of almost all the investigations and studies that have been carried out on the diagnosing and balancing of bowed rotating systems. The articles are categorized into two major classes, diagnosing and balancing/correcting approaches to bowed rotors. The former is divided into three subclasses, i.e., time-domain, frequency-domain, and time–frequency-domain analyses; the latter is divided into three other sub-sections that concern influence coefficient, modal balancing, and optimization method in correcting. Since the number of investigations in the time domain is relatively high, this category is subdivided into two groups: manual and smart inspection. Finally, a summary is provided, as well as some new research prospects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-destructive Evaluation for Products and Processes)
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