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Nanoparticles in Sensing and Labelling

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanotechnology and Applied Nanosciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020) | Viewed by 15236

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Institute of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Department of Physical Chemistry and Microreaction Technology, Technische Universität Ilmenau, 98693 Ilmenau, Germany
Interests: microfluidic synthesis of metal nanoparticles; electrical properties of nanoparticles; non-spherical and composite nanoparticles; nanoparticles in sensing and labelling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The convergence between technical and natural principles is an urgent challenge for developing powerful and sustainable devices and materials. This insight demands shrinking of our devices, sensors, and labels down to the microscopic or even the molecular scale, on the one hand. On the other hand, it demands making materials intelligent, functionalizing them, and arranging the atoms and molecules of materials into universally handable and applicable entities. Functional micro- and nanoparticles meet these requirements. They help to overcome the borderline between material and device and become able to uptake, convert, and deliver information. Research in recent years has shown that these features can be implemented into nanoparticles and make them useful microtools as labels and transducers. This Special Issue will reflect the state-of-the-art in this field and discuss new promising strategies for synthesis and application of micro- and nanoparticles in physics, chemistry, material development, biomedicine, and cell technology.

Prof. Dr. Johann Michael Köhler
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanoparticles
  • particle synthesis
  • labeling
  • sensing
  • signal transduction
  • surface functionalization
  • composite particles
  • multicomponent particles
  • particle-based communication

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 3682 KiB  
Article
2-LED-µSpectrophotometer for Rapid On-Site Detection of Pathogens Using Noble-Metal Nanoparticle-Based Colorimetric Assays
by Cornelia Reuter, Matthias Urban, Manuel Arnold, Ondrej Stranik, Andrea Csáki and Wolfgang Fritzsche
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(8), 2658; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10082658 - 12 Apr 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2923
Abstract
Novel point-of-care compatible methods such as colorimetric assays have become increasingly important in the field of early pathogen detection. A simple and hand-held prototype device for carrying out DNA-amplification assay based on plasmonic nanoparticles in the colorimetric detection is presented. The low-cost device [...] Read more.
Novel point-of-care compatible methods such as colorimetric assays have become increasingly important in the field of early pathogen detection. A simple and hand-held prototype device for carrying out DNA-amplification assay based on plasmonic nanoparticles in the colorimetric detection is presented. The low-cost device with two channels (sample and reference) consists of two spectrally different light emitting diodes (LEDs) for detection of the plasmon shift. The color change of the gold-nanoparticle-DNA conjugates caused by a salt-induced aggregation test is examined in particular. A specific and sensitive detection of the waterborne human pathogen Legionella pneumophila is demonstrated. This colorimetric assay, with a simple assay design and simple readout device requirements, can be monitored in real-time on-site. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticles in Sensing and Labelling)
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11 pages, 2002 KiB  
Article
A Mechanism of Gold Nanoparticle Aggregation by Immunoglobulin G Preparation
by Dmitriy V. Sotnikov, Irina V. Safenkova, Anatoly V. Zherdev, Vadim G. Avdienko, Irina V. Kozlova, Suren S. Babayan, Vladislav Ya. Gergert and Boris B. Dzantiev
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(2), 475; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10020475 - 9 Jan 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 5845
Abstract
Conjugates of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and antibodies are widely used in various fields of biochemistry and microbiology. However, the procedure for obtaining such conjugates remains precarious, and the properties of conjugates differ significantly for different antibody clones. One of the most common problems [...] Read more.
Conjugates of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and antibodies are widely used in various fields of biochemistry and microbiology. However, the procedure for obtaining such conjugates remains precarious, and the properties of conjugates differ significantly for different antibody clones. One of the most common problems is the aggregation of GNPs in the course of their conjugation with antibodies. This article considers an example of the conjugation of monoclonal antibodies with non-stable aggregating product. The composition of the antibody preparation was studied using electrophoresis, asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation, and ultracentrifugation. It was shown that the component that causes the aggregation of the GNPs is the light chains of immunoglobulins that appear due to the spontaneous decay of the antibodies. After separation of the fraction with a molecular weight of less than 30 kDa, stable conjugates of antibodies with GNPs were obtained. The high functional activity of the obtained conjugates was confirmed by immunochromatography. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticles in Sensing and Labelling)
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Review

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14 pages, 2661 KiB  
Review
Synthetic Approaches, Modification Strategies and the Application of Quantum Dots in the Sensing of Priority Pollutants
by Rodney Maluleke and Oluwatobi Samuel Oluwafemi
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(24), 11580; https://doi.org/10.3390/app112411580 - 7 Dec 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2219
Abstract
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitro-aromatic compounds (NACs) are two classifications of environmental pollutants that have become a source of health concerns. As a result, there have been several efforts towards the development of analytical methods that are efficient and affordable that can [...] Read more.
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitro-aromatic compounds (NACs) are two classifications of environmental pollutants that have become a source of health concerns. As a result, there have been several efforts towards the development of analytical methods that are efficient and affordable that can sense these pollutants. In recent decades, a wide range of techniques has been developed for the detection of pollutants present in the environment. Among these different techniques, the use of semiconductor nanomaterials, also known as quantum dots, has continued to gain more attention in sensing because of the optical properties that make them useful in the identification and differentiation of pollutants in water bodies. Reported studies have shown great improvement in the sensing of these pollutants. This review article starts with an introduction on two types of organic pollutants, namely polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitro-aromatic explosives. This is then followed by different quantum dots used in sensing applications. Then, a detailed discussion on different groups of quantum dots, such as carbon-based quantum dots, binary and ternary quantum dots and quantum dot composites, and their application in the sensing of organic pollutants is presented. Different studies on the comparison of water-soluble quantum dots and organic-soluble quantum dots of a fluorescence sensing mechanism are reviewed. Then, different approaches on the improvement of their sensitivity and selectivity in addition to challenges associated with some of these approaches are also discussed. The review is concluded by looking at different mechanisms in the sensing of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitro-aromatic compounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticles in Sensing and Labelling)
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37 pages, 5778 KiB  
Review
Sensor Micro and Nanoparticles for Microfluidic Application
by Raminta Mazetyte-Stasinskiene and Johann Michael Köhler
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(23), 8353; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10238353 - 24 Nov 2020
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3504
Abstract
Micro and nanoparticles are not only understood as components of materials but as small functional units too. Particles can be designed for the primary transduction of physical and chemical signals and, therefore, become a valuable component in sensing systems. Due to their small [...] Read more.
Micro and nanoparticles are not only understood as components of materials but as small functional units too. Particles can be designed for the primary transduction of physical and chemical signals and, therefore, become a valuable component in sensing systems. Due to their small size, they are particularly interesting for sensing in microfluidic systems, in microarray arrangements and in miniaturized biotechnological systems and microreactors, in general. Here, an overview of the recent development in the preparation of micro and nanoparticles for sensing purposes in microfluidics and application of particles in various microfluidic devices is presented. The concept of sensor particles is particularly useful for combining a direct contact between cells, biomolecules and media with a contactless optical readout. In addition to the construction and synthesis of micro and nanoparticles with transducer functions, examples of chemical and biological applications are reported. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticles in Sensing and Labelling)
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