Virtual Models for Autonomous Driving Systems

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Transportation and Future Mobility".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 August 2024 | Viewed by 1027

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Automotive Engineering and Transports, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca Romania, 400114 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
Interests: electric vehicles; fuel cell vehicles; powertrain concept; electronic control unit; in-vehicle communication network; energy efficiency; autonomous vehicles; computer modeling and simulation in the automotive field
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Electrotechnics and Measurements, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, 400114 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
Interests: numerical methods and modelling techniques in electromagnetics; artificial intelligence algorithms and inverse problems; electromagnetic field analysis; synthesis and optimization; energy efficiency solutions
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Automotive Engineering and Transports, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, 400001 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
Interests: electric vehicles; hybrid vehicles; electric vehicle battery, fuel cell vehicles; autonomous vehicles; general powertrain efficiency; OBD diagnostics protocols; powertrain simulation; virtual vehicle testing
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Special Issue "Virtual Models for Autonomous Driving Systems" intends to compile autonomous driving simulation methods and scenarios into a single compendium to provide scientists and researchers with a clear methodology for validating autonomous vehicles.

A virtual model is a digital illustration of physical system elements displayed on a graphical user interface. Behind the user's graphic interface is a mathematical and logical mechanism that explains the behavior of the real system over time and under user-defined specifications.

Computer simulation is performed using software applications that aim to convert a real vehicle model into a virtual application to predict its behavior and performance, as well as set limits for enhanced performance while keeping a solid state. Compared to real vehicle models, virtual models used in computer simulations have significant advantages, including the capacity to change constructive and functional factors and the virtual model's constructive architecture at any stage of the development process.

A virtual model used for computer simulation is the study of reality in a virtual environment using a theoretical model, a digital image of a real model that needs improvement. The virtual model's complexity must correspond to the reality of the assessed system, being as complex as necessary while being as simple as feasible so that the results obtained from computer simulations may be validated by experimental data.

Autonomous driving means that most of the control is transferred from the human factor to computerized decision-making systems. Running an autonomous vehicle in a virtual environment is the initial step in the validation process, providing annalists with valuable feedback for improvement before becoming live in the real world.

The Special Issue "Virtual Model for Autonomous Driving System" allows authors to publish open access papers on autonomous driving virtual systems and algorithms, including virtual environments, routes, infrastructure, and traffic models, simulation methodology and scenarios for connected vehicles, and collaborative driving integrated into intelligent transportation systems.

Dr. Calin Iclodean
Prof. Dr. Dan Doru Micu
Prof. Dr. Bogdan Ovidiu Varga
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • autonomous driving system
  • autonomous driving algorithm
  • virtual vehicle model (or digital twin)
  • virtual environment model
  • virtual route and infrastructure
  • virtual traffic model
  • virtual reality for autonomous driving
  • augmented reality for autonomous driving
  • simulation methodology
  • simulation scenario
  • object classification mechanism
  • model-in-the-loop
  • software-in-the-loop
  • connected vehicles
  • collaborative driving
  • modular autonomous vehicles
  • intelligent transportation system

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

21 pages, 5343 KiB  
Article
Comparative Analysis of Energy Efficiency between Battery Electric Buses and Modular Autonomous Vehicles
by Ioan-Tudor Oargă, Gabriel Prunean, Bogdan Ovidiu Varga, Dan Moldovanu and Dan Doru Micu
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(11), 4389; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14114389 - 22 May 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 702
Abstract
This paper presents the initial steps taken in analysing the benefits of connected autonomous vehicles (CAVs), especially Modular Autonomous Vehicles (MAVs), in search of sustainable solutions for reducing energy consumption per passenger in air transport. For this particular case, a Mobility-as-a-Service (MaaS) solution [...] Read more.
This paper presents the initial steps taken in analysing the benefits of connected autonomous vehicles (CAVs), especially Modular Autonomous Vehicles (MAVs), in search of sustainable solutions for reducing energy consumption per passenger in air transport. For this particular case, a Mobility-as-a-Service (MaaS) solution is proposed, correlating airside transport with landside transport, as an urban mobility alternative. To better understand the benefits of the proposal, this paper studies the impact on energy consumption conceptual differences between a conventional public transport fleet using Battery Electric Buses (BEBs) and an MAV fleet. Simulations for simple public transport tasks are performed to highlight the advantages of the modular vehicle concept, in which routes are assigned dynamically based on the requested passenger carrying capacity and travel distance, aiming to optimize the efficiency of the entire system. With a proven reduction in energy consumption due to better use of available passenger capacity and reduced travel times in which the vehicle is driving with a number of passengers less than half of its capacity, the concept can be addressed further in developing a predictive system that processes public transport data and delivers an optimized schedule for the entire fleet. The main goal being to improve overall operational efficiency and total cost of ownership, the second part of the paper studies the impact of weight distribution on efficiency parameters such as energy consumption, range, and overall performance of an electric bus. The impact on dynamic elements such as acceleration, braking, and cornering performance is analyzed, to assess the viability and safety of all types of electric bus operations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Virtual Models for Autonomous Driving Systems)
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