Special Issue "Current Developments and Challenges on Maritime Safety and Environment Protection Technology"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Marine Science and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Ik-Soon Cho
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Division of Global Maritime Studies, Korea Maritime and Ocean University, Busan 49112, Korea
Interests: traffic safety; maritime; ships; transportation; traffic engineering; naval architecture; transportation science
Prof. Chong-Ju Chae
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Director of Ocean Safety and Technology Center, Korea Institute of Maritime and Fisheries Technology (KIMFT), 367 Haeyang-ro, Busan 49111, Korea
Interests: maritime safety and technology engineering; human factors; formal safety assessment; maritime environment protection technology; safe operation of maritime autonomous surface ship (MASS); risk assessment
Prof. Margareta H. Lützhöft
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Maritime Studies, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, 5063 Bergen, Norway
Interests: maritime human factors; human-centered design; automation/autonomy and the effects of new technology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is no doubt that maritime safety and the marine environment are the most important issues in all human maritime activities. These are important missions of the International Maritime Organization as well. The question of how to secure maritime safety, protect the marine environment, and achieve safe and environmentally friendly development always poses a great challenge to researchers.

Representatively, IMO's formal safety assessment, GHG (Green House Gas) policy, ship accident prevention technology, safe navigation technology of autonomous ships, human factors, the impact of the marine environment protection aspect of autonomous ships, green ship technology, among others, are being discussed in the field of maritime industry.  

In order to secure maritime safety, there have been various studies and the implementation of international regulations on human factors, safety navigation, FSA, goal base standard, cyber security, safety system, etc. However, ship accidents with similar causes continue to occur. These highlight the need for continuous research on more reliable and effective safety systems. In particular, research on autonomous ships should be considered in various aspects, such as the safe operating standards of autonomous ships, the range of safety that can be accepted by the industry, the safe operating relationship between existing ships and autonomous ships, and international conventions, etc.

In terms of marine environment, research and development into ships that use eco-friendly fuels such as alternative fuels for ships, EEOI (Energy Efficiency Operational Indicator), EEDI (Energy Efficiency Design Index), and electric propulsion ships are being actively conducted in accordance with various discussions on GHG. In addition, research on marine environment protection technology has been conducted in various fields including ship’s exhaust gas, fine dust, particle matter, garbage, noise, and maritime pollution caused by accidents, and the results of these studies will have a large impact on the protection of the marine environment. This Special Issue addresses but is not limited to the following areas:

  • Technology for maritime safety;
  • Maritime safety and human factors;
  • Formal Safety Assessment;
  • Maritime accidents analysis and implementation of analyzed causes;
  • Safety operation of special purpose vessel;
  • Safety technology for Maritime Autonomous Surface Ship (MASS);
  • Technology for prevention for marine environment;
  • Maritime Technology for GHG;
  • Impact to marine environment by operation of MASS;
  • Green ship technology;
  • Marine Plastic issues;
  • Underwater noise caused by ship operation issues;
  • Alternative ship’s fuel;
  • e-Navigation

Prof. Ik-Soon Cho
Prof. Chong-Ju Chae
Prof. Margareta H. Lützhöft
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
A Study on the Analysis of the Effects of Passenger Ship Abandonment Training Using VR
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(13), 5919; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11135919 - 25 Jun 2021
Viewed by 343
Abstract
Virtual reality (VR) has been adopted for education and training in numerous lines of work. In the field of maritime education and training (MET), training with VR has been implemented in areas such as engine room system familiarization, dangerous work onboard familiarization, and [...] Read more.
Virtual reality (VR) has been adopted for education and training in numerous lines of work. In the field of maritime education and training (MET), training with VR has been implemented in areas such as engine room system familiarization, dangerous work onboard familiarization, and emergency response. In addition, in line with current trends in maritime autonomous surface ship (MASS) technology developments, trial applications of VR have been implemented to understand the applicability of this type of vessel. Moreover, there is an increasing need to reinforce education/training in MET to reduce ship accidents. The purpose of this study is to investigate the level of satisfaction with VR education/training, the impact of that education, and matters requiring training emphasis for implementation. To this end, the training participants’ satisfaction with VR training was compared to that of video training, and items of strategic importance in the training content were identified using Borich’s needs assessment, after which the educational impact of VR training was compared to that of video training. The results of this study are expected to contribute to the extended application of MET using VR, and can help in identifying areas for emphasis in training to reduce maritime accidents. Full article
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Article
Application of Collision Warning Algorithm Alarm in Fishing Vessel’s Waterway
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(10), 4479; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11104479 - 14 May 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 380
Abstract
The aim of this study is to apply a collision warning algorithm for a small fishing vessel in a fishing waterway to verify its alarm operation and to validate its feasibility. For this purpose, a scenario-based real ship test was conducted, and cases [...] Read more.
The aim of this study is to apply a collision warning algorithm for a small fishing vessel in a fishing waterway to verify its alarm operation and to validate its feasibility. For this purpose, a scenario-based real ship test was conducted, and cases extracted from real sea data (Vpass data) were applied. Moreover, zones with frequent alarms and high-risk waters were compared. First, we installed millimeter-wave communication terminals in three small fishing vessels and applied our algorithm based on two scenarios. Furthermore, we applied the collision warning algorithm by extracting two cases encountered by multiple ships from the Vpass data. The results show that the algorithm triggered alarms continuously under risky situations. This study also compares waterway risk levels as assessed by maritime risk-assessment tools (potential assessment of risk model, environment stress model, and International Association of Marine Aids to Navigation and Lighthouse Authorities Waterway Risk Assessment Program MkII) and the locations having frequent alarms based on Vpass data collected for 7 days. Not only did the eastern sea of Yeongheung Island indicate that more alarms were triggered, but we found high-risk results from the risk-level assessment, indicating that the risky zones and the frequent alarm zones were identical. Additional research is necessary to develop an algorithm based on qualitative evaluation by actual ship operators. In addition, since fishing vessels navigate differently from general navigation methods during fishing, it is necessary to develop additional algorithms for this. Full article
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