Special Issue "Light Matter Interaction at Nanoscale: What Matters Most"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Optics and Lasers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Vladimir P. Drachev

(1) Department of Physics and Advanced Materials Manufacturing Processing Institute, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203, USA
(2) Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Moscow, 121205, Russia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: optics; nonlinear optics; spectroscopy; plasmonics; nanophotonics; nanofabrication; plasmonic applications in biosensing and metamaterials; nanoscale and microwave photonics
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Allan D. Boardman

Material & Physics Research Group, Salford Innovation in Research Centre (SIRC), School of Computing, Science & Engineering, University of Salford, Salford M5 4WT, UK
Website
Interests: surface plasmons; guided wave optics, especially nonlinear waves, solitons, magneto-optics and negative refracting metamaterials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We invite you contribute to this Special Issue, which continues highlighting advanced activity in the field of light–matter interactions at the nanoscale. Light–matter interactions, at the nanometer scale, is a growing field of research known as nano-optics and nano-photonics. The main motivation comes from the potential to extend concepts and functionalities of conventional optics and photonics down to the nanometer scale, towards ultra-compact photonic and imaging devices that may overcome the diffraction limit. This field obviously covers a broad scope and is expected to have a strong impact on our society, especially in the areas of chip-scale optical interconnects, bio-medical applications, and the development of nanoscopy for subwavelength resolution imaging and nano-photolithography due to the high wavevector components of detected light.

This Special Issue is intended to cover the most important aspects of the basics and applications in subwavelength resolution microscopy, interaction of light with nanoscale systems like artificial quantum structures, molecules, and proteins, optical interaction between nanosystems, and resonance phenomena localized surface plasmons, surface plasmon polaritons, and microresonators.

Prof. Dr. Vladimir P. Drachev
Prof. Dr. Allan D. Boardman
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanooptics
  • nanophotonics
  • guiding light
  • on-chip optical interconnects
  • localized plasmonics
  • surface plasmon polaritons
  • microwave photonics
  • metamaterials
  • nanolithography

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Deep Electrical Modulation of Terahertz Wave Based on Hybrid Metamaterial-Dielectric-Graphene Structure
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(3), 507; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9030507
Received: 6 January 2019 / Revised: 24 January 2019 / Accepted: 29 January 2019 / Published: 1 February 2019
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Abstract
A terahertz modulation structure based on hybrid metamaterial and graphene is proposed and demonstrated in this work. The metamaterial with a square slit ring array excites terahertz resonance in the slits and enhances the interaction between the terahertz wave and graphene. The graphene [...] Read more.
A terahertz modulation structure based on hybrid metamaterial and graphene is proposed and demonstrated in this work. The metamaterial with a square slit ring array excites terahertz resonance in the slits and enhances the interaction between the terahertz wave and graphene. The graphene layer acting as the active material is tuned by the applied electrical field. With the separation by a dielectric layer between the graphene and the metallic structure, the resonant frequency and transmitted energy are both modulated by the graphene. Experimental result indicates that the modulation depth of the terahertz transmitted amplitude is 65.1% when the applied modulation voltage is tuned 5 V. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Light Matter Interaction at Nanoscale: What Matters Most)
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Open AccessArticle Plasmonics in the Ultraviolet with Aluminum, Gallium, Magnesium and Rhodium
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(1), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8010064
Received: 5 December 2017 / Revised: 26 December 2017 / Accepted: 28 December 2017 / Published: 4 January 2018
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (9683 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Ultraviolet plasmonics (UV) has become an active topic of research due to the new challenges arising in fields such as biosensing, chemistry or spectroscopy. Recent studies have pointed out aluminum, gallium, magnesium and rhodium as promising candidates for plasmonics in the UV range. [...] Read more.
Ultraviolet plasmonics (UV) has become an active topic of research due to the new challenges arising in fields such as biosensing, chemistry or spectroscopy. Recent studies have pointed out aluminum, gallium, magnesium and rhodium as promising candidates for plasmonics in the UV range. Aluminum and magnesium present a high oxidation tendency that has a critical effect in their plasmonic performance. Nevertheless, gallium and rhodium have drawn a lot of attention because of their low tendency of oxidation and, at the same time, good plasmonic response in the UV and excellent photocatalytic properties. Here, we present a short overview of the current state of UV plasmonics with the latest findings in the plasmonic response and applications of aluminum, gallium, magnesium and rhodium nanoparticles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Light Matter Interaction at Nanoscale: What Matters Most)
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Figure 1

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