Special Issue "Advanced Technologies in Lifelong Learning"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Industrial Technologies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Carlos Alario-Hoyos
Website
Guest Editor
Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Spain

Special Issue Information

The rapid changes in today’s society and in the labor market require workers to undergo constant retraining in order to update and adapt their knowledge and skills throughout their lives. These new education needs occur at a time of transformation of face-to-face education and expansion of blended and online education. Regarding face-to-face education, for example, mobile technologies and sensors are being introduced more and more in the classroom with the aim to encourage technology-driven interaction between students and teachers and also to be able to collect much more information of what happens in the classroom in real time. Regarding online education, for example, new models such as MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) emerged in the last decade as a way to offer quality structured open educational resources to learners worldwide, and at the same time fostering the digital transformation of many universities. In addition, the opportunities to collect and analyze many more data of learners’ behavior and performance in face-to-face, blended, and online education, together with the development of artificial intelligence and machine learning techniques, has allowed a fast development of the field of learning analytics in order to support instructors in the redesign and adaptation of their contents and classes, and learners in increasing their awareness on their progress, and in the development of their self-regulated learning skills, among others.

Dr. Carlos Alario-Hoyos
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs)
  • Smart Learning Enviroments (SLEs)
  • Augmented, virtual, and mixed realities (AR/VR/MR) for education
  • Learning Analytics (LA)
  • Visualization dashboards for education
  • Self-regulated learning (SRL) and self-directed learning (SDL)
  • Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence applied to education
  • Gamification, game-based, and simulation-based learning
  • Mobile and wearable technologies for education
  • Remote and virtual labs in education

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Usability Evaluation for the Integration of Library Data Analysis and an Interactive Artwork by Sensing Technology
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(21), 7499; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10217499 - 25 Oct 2020
Abstract
In this research, we propose innovative ideas for digital art combined with educational applications for the library. It also presents the library’s information services to be more humane and interesting. By taking interactive devices as the basis, this research integrates college library borrowing [...] Read more.
In this research, we propose innovative ideas for digital art combined with educational applications for the library. It also presents the library’s information services to be more humane and interesting. By taking interactive devices as the basis, this research integrates college library borrowing data and an interactive artwork in order to perform an information visualization service for a user in the library by using their own smart phone. This research uses an instant data operation to carry out the information inquiry applications to present three years of library borrowing data, from 2013 to 2015, obtained from the Hsih Shin University library Data Access Protocol. Finally, a usability evaluation for the interactive art is conducted. To testify that this interactive art design meets the principle of user acceptance, a questionnaire survey is used for the statistical verification. The research findings show that a positive explanation value was achieved for user acceptance. The research model proposed by this research acts as a usability evaluation of the integrated application of an interactive artwork and library information service. The research model also corresponded to the user’s emotional feedback in the HCI research field. The value of this research is that we provide usability-verified models for cross-domain applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Technologies in Lifelong Learning)
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Open AccessArticle
Augmented Reality to Facilitate Learning of the Acoustic Guitar
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(7), 2425; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10072425 - 02 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Many people wishing to learn a musical instrument opt to learn using alternative or informal methods instead of the traditional Master–Apprentice model that requires a greater cognitive load. This paper presents an augmented reality (AR)-based application designed to teach and train guitar chords, [...] Read more.
Many people wishing to learn a musical instrument opt to learn using alternative or informal methods instead of the traditional Master–Apprentice model that requires a greater cognitive load. This paper presents an augmented reality (AR)-based application designed to teach and train guitar chords, with the novelty that it is also used to teach short melodies consisting of four chord transitions so that users have to change hand and finger positions. The app uses high-quality 3D models of an acoustic guitar and animated hand to indicate correct finger positions and the movements required when changing from one chord to another. To follow the animated instructions, the learner overlaps the 3D model onto the neck of the physical guitar and his or her own hand. A system usability scale (SUS) questionnaire was used to measure the usability of the application. A score of 82.0 was obtained, which is higher than the average of 68 points that indicates the application is good from a user experience perspective, thus satisfying the purpose for which it was created. Having analysed the data for both groups—individuals with no prior experience of playing a musical instrument versus individuals with prior experience—it was concluded that the application provided a useful learning approach for all participants involved in the study, regardless of experience. That said, those possessing prior experience of playing an instrument learnt faster. It should be noted that the research revealed significant difference in learning by gender, with male participants learning faster than female participants. Similar results have been detected in other research performed in the field of music, as well as in other fields. As this study required spatial reasoning when viewing the 3D model, the differences identified this case may well have arisen as a consequence of differences in men and women’s spatial awareness, thereby leaving open an alternative line of research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Technologies in Lifelong Learning)
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